APPENDIX
D

Biographical Sketches

LORRAINE M. McDONNELL (Cochair) is professor of political science and education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previously she was a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. Her research interests include the design and implementation of educational reform initiatives, the role of teacher unions, and the development and use of educational accountability systems. In her most recent research, McDonnell is examining the design and implementation of new forms of student assessment in three states. That study, being conducted over four years, is tracing the political origins of new state assessments and monitoring their impact in a sample of schools and classrooms. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University.

MARGARET J. McLAUGHLIN (Cochair) is the associate director of the Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth at the University of Maryland at College Park, where she directs several national projects related to school reform and special education. Currently she also codirects the National Center for Disability Policy and directs the Center for Urban Special Education, a school/university partnership between the Baltimore city public schools and the University of Maryland. Previously she directed the National Center for Policy Options in Special Education, which investigated critical issues and policy implications related to school restructuring and students with disabilities. Her recent research publications examine the extent to which students with disabilities and special education programs interact with school reform initiatives, such as assessments and new governance structures. She has a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Virginia.

ANSLEY BACON is director of the Westchester Institute for Human Development at the Westchester County Medical Center in Valhalla, NY. She is also



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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches LORRAINE M. McDONNELL (Cochair) is professor of political science and education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previously she was a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. Her research interests include the design and implementation of educational reform initiatives, the role of teacher unions, and the development and use of educational accountability systems. In her most recent research, McDonnell is examining the design and implementation of new forms of student assessment in three states. That study, being conducted over four years, is tracing the political origins of new state assessments and monitoring their impact in a sample of schools and classrooms. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University. MARGARET J. McLAUGHLIN (Cochair) is the associate director of the Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth at the University of Maryland at College Park, where she directs several national projects related to school reform and special education. Currently she also codirects the National Center for Disability Policy and directs the Center for Urban Special Education, a school/university partnership between the Baltimore city public schools and the University of Maryland. Previously she directed the National Center for Policy Options in Special Education, which investigated critical issues and policy implications related to school restructuring and students with disabilities. Her recent research publications examine the extent to which students with disabilities and special education programs interact with school reform initiatives, such as assessments and new governance structures. She has a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Virginia. ANSLEY BACON is director of the Westchester Institute for Human Development at the Westchester County Medical Center in Valhalla, NY. She is also

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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform director of the Developmental Disabilities Program in the Graduate School of Health Science and associate professor of clinical psychiatry at the New York Medical College. Previously she was assistant professor of psychology at the University of Southern Mississippi, director of the Mississippi University Affiliated Program of the University of Southern Mississippi and the University of Mississippi, and director of the Psychology Department at Hudspeth Retardation Center in Jackson, MS. She is a member of the American Association of Mental Retardation, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, and the Association for the Advancement of Children's Health. Her publications are concerned with pathways to employment for adults with developmental disabilities. She has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from West Virginia University. STEPHEN N. ELLIOTT is professor of educational psychology and a senior research fellow in the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research focuses on the assessment of children's academic and social behavior and the use of behavioral consultation to deliver psychoeducational services to students with disabilities. He currently codirects federal grant projects on the use of large-scale performance assessments with students with disabilities and on the effectiveness of school and home-based consultation services for aggressive children. He is the past editor of School Psychology Review and coauthor of the Social Skills Rating System. He has an M.A. from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. from Arizona State University. LYNN S. FUCHS is professor of special education and co-director of the John F. Kennedy Center's Institute of Education and Learning at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. Her research focuses on teachers' use of assessment information in instructional planning, computer applications that enhance the connection between assessment and instructional effectiveness, and methods for helping general educators address the needs of diverse learners. She has over 180 publications in these areas, serves on the editorial boards of eight journals in general and special education, and is the coeditor of The Journal of Special Education. She has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Minnesota. MARGARET E. GOERTZ is professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania and co-director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education. Previously, she was executive director of the Education Policy Research Division of the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, NJ. A past president of the American Education Finance Association, Goertz's research focuses on issues of education finance, state education reform policies, and state and federal programs for special needs students. Her current research activities include studies of standards-based reform in education and the allocation of school-level resources. Goertz has M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social science from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.

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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform MICHAEL L. HARDMAN is associate dean for research in the Graduate School of Education and professor of special education at the University of Utah. As a researcher, he has published textbooks and journal articles and directed national demonstration projects in the areas of severe disabilities, inclusive education, transition from school to adult life, and training future leaders in special education. He is active in professional organizations and has served on national boards and committees for the Council for Exceptional Children and the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps. He is currently the chief education advisor to the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation and past president of the Higher Education Consortium for Special Education. He has a Ph.D. in educational administration with an emphasis on special education policy. TED S. HASSELBRING is professor of special education, co-director of the Learning Technology Center, and scientist in the John F. Kennedy Center at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. He is an active member of the Council for Exceptional Children and is past president of its technology and media division. His research is directed at the use of technology for enhancing learning for students with mild disabilities and those who are at risk of school failure. He is also interested in the use of technology for improving undergraduate and graduate teacher education. He has a B.S., M.A.T., and Ed.D. (the latter in special education) from Indiana University. DANIEL M. KORETZ is a senior social scientist with the RAND Institute on Education and Training in Washington, DC. Much of his research focuses on educational assessment, particularly as a tool of education policy. In response to current initiatives to include students with special needs in education reform, he recently began a five-year series of studies of the assessment of students with disabilities. He began his career as a public school teacher of students with severe emotional disturbance. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Cornell University. PATRICIA MORISON (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. Previously she was at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where she served as a senior analyst for reports on educational testing, adult literacy, and teachers' use of technology in the classroom. Her research interests include competence and stress resistance in children, children at educational risk, motivation and learning, and the consequences and public understanding of tests and their uses. Morison has an Ed.M. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Ph.D. in child clinical psychology from the University of Minnesota. ARIE L. NETTLES is assistant professor and assistant research scientist of education in the School of Education and psychologist in the Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the University of Michigan. She is pursuing two lines of research that include the study of academic achievement and the impact

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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform of sickle cell disease on children, sponsored in part by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation; and the equity issues in educational testing and assessment, sponsored in part by the Ford Foundation. She has a B.S. in social science education and an M.S. in education administration from the University of Tennessee and a Ph.D. in psychology specializing in both clinical and school psychology from Vanderbilt University. IAN E. NOVOS recently joined KPMG Peat Marwick's Economic Consulting Services group in New York City. He has been a faculty member at the University of Southern California and the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research has most recently focused on the nexus between labor markets and the structure and organization of firms. Novos received bachelor of commerce and bachelor of science degrees from the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, an M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in economics) from the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1992, he has been board president of the Western Law Center for Disability Rights, a leading provider of legal services to the community of people with disabilities in Southern California. DIANA C. PULLIN is professor in the School of Education at Boston College and has both a law degree and a doctoral degree in education from the University of Iowa. As a practicing attorney, she has represented school districts, teachers unions, parents, students, and educators in a broad range of matters concerning education law, civil rights, and employment. She is most known for her representation of a statewide class of students in Florida who successfully challenged the state's requirement that students pass a minimum competency test in order to receive a high school diploma (Debra v. Turlington). She has also been involved in a number of cases addressing the provision of special education services to handicapped students; has served as consultant to and trainer of other attorneys in the area of special education law, written a manual for advocates in this area; and served as an impartial due process hearing officer in special education disputes. As an academic, she has served as a member of the tenured faculties of the School of Education at Boston College and the College of Education at Michigan State University. From 1987–1994, she served as Dean of Education at Boston College. She is the author of many articles, book chapters, and one book in the areas of education law, public policy, law and testing, and education reform. DANIEL J. RESCHLY is distinguished professor and director of the School Psychology Program at Iowa State University, where he holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Psychology and Professional Studies in Education. He has an M.A. from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon. He has served as a school psychologist in Iowa, Oregon, and Arizona, and was an assistant professor for four years at the University of Arizona. Reschly has published widely on the topics of school psychology professional practices,

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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform adaptive behavior, behavioral consultation, mild mental retardation, and legal issues. He has been active in state and national leadership roles, including president of the National Association of School Psychologists, chair of its Graduate Program Approval, and editor of School Psychology Review. He has received three distinguished service awards from the National Association of School Psychologists, the Stroud Award, and appointment as a fellow of the American Psychological Association. MARTHA THURLOW is associate director of the National Center on Educational Outcomes at the University of Minnesota. She has conducted research involving special education for the past 25 years in a variety of areas, including assessment and decision making, learning disabilities, early childhood education, dropout prevention, effective classroom instruction, and integration of students with disabilities into general education settings. She has published extensively on the academic engagement and learning opportunity of elementary students, including those with disabilities. Her current research emphasis is on the implications of contemporary U.S. policy and practice for students with disabilities, including national and statewide assessment policies and practices, standards-setting efforts, and graduation requirements. She currently is a co-editor of Exceptional Children, the research journal of the Council for Exceptional Children. She has a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. (the latter in educational psychology) from the University of Minnesota. EDWARD LEE VARGAS is the superintendent of the Santa Fe Public School District, in Santa Fe, NM. He formerly served as the assistant superintendent for California's eighth largest and most diverse school system, the Santa Ana unified School District. He is a nationally recognized educational leader in reform and restructuring, particularly for categorically funded programs such as Chapter 1, Bilingual Education and Special Education. His experience involves both special and general education, including work as a classroom teacher, school psychologist, and special education director, as well as various central office positions in large urban districts in several states, initiating school improvement efforts for grades K-12. As a recipient of numerous awards for his leadership from various organizations, including the American Association of School Administrators and the California State Department of Education, he has been a featured speaker at various state, national, and international conferences on leadership, school restructuring and special education reform. He has a Ph.D. in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Washington. RICHARD K. WAGNER is a professor of psychology at Florida State University. His major area of research interest is the acquisition of complex cognitive knowledge and skills, which he has pursued in two domains. In the domain of reading, his research has focused on the role of reading-related phonological processing abilities in normal and abnormal development of reading skills, and in the

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Educating One & All: Students with Disabilities and Standards-Based Reform prediction, prevention, and remediation of dyslexia. In the domain of human intelligence, his research has focused on the role of practical knowledge and intelligence in intellectual performance manifested outside the classroom setting. Before embarking on a research career, he completed a year of internship and two years of experience as a school psychologist. He has an M.A. in school psychology from the University of Akron and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Yale University. JOHN F. WITTE is professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Previously, in addition to holding faculty positions at the University of Wisconsin, he was associate director of the Robert M. La Follette Institute of Public Affairs and executive director of the Study Commission on the Quality of Education in the Metropolitan Milwaukee Public Schools. His publications concern workers' participation in American corporations and choice and control in American education. He has a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, both in political science, from Yale University.

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