7
RESOURCES

You can mentor more easily and effectively if you know what resources are available at your own institution. A departmental adviser might supply students' schedules and requirements. A student-affairs office usually offers tutoring and workshops on study skills or "college survival." The health or counseling center can usually suggest an appropriate counselor, physician, or psychologist when a student needs professional help with personal problems. To equip yourself to do career planning, begin with your career-placement center, which should have a variety of services and information.

Internet Resources

The Internet can also help you mentor more effectively and easily in a number of ways. For example, e-mail and "chat groups" can be used to keep in touch with students. In addition, the Internet can provide access to worldwide resources, such as those described below.



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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering 7 RESOURCES You can mentor more easily and effectively if you know what resources are available at your own institution. A departmental adviser might supply students' schedules and requirements. A student-affairs office usually offers tutoring and workshops on study skills or "college survival." The health or counseling center can usually suggest an appropriate counselor, physician, or psychologist when a student needs professional help with personal problems. To equip yourself to do career planning, begin with your career-placement center, which should have a variety of services and information. Internet Resources The Internet can also help you mentor more effectively and easily in a number of ways. For example, e-mail and "chat groups" can be used to keep in touch with students. In addition, the Internet can provide access to worldwide resources, such as those described below.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering The Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy's (COSEPUP) homepage (http://www2.nas.edu/cosepup) has links to on-line versions of its useful resources Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers, Careers in Science and Engineering: A Student Planning Guide to Grad School and Beyond, On Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct in Research, and A National Conversation on Doctoral Education: An Emerging Consensus. Two key Internet resources are: The National Research Council's Career Planning Center for Beginning Scientists and Engineers (CPC) (http://www2.nas.edu/cpc) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science's NextWave (http://www.nextwave.org). The CPC includes a bulletin board, an on-line mentoring

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering center, data on trends and changes in the job market, and links to the many useful on-line books, job and research funding listings, and disciplinary society web sites. The NextWave has open forums on topical issues, feature articles on alternative science careers, site reviews, news articles, and nuts-and-bolts science career advice columns. Gender, Cultural, and Disability Issues Minority-group students can obtain guidance and scholarship aid through NACME, Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Ave., Suite 2212, New York, NY 10118-2299 (Telephone, 212/279-2626; URL, http://www.nacme.org). The New England Board of Higher Education also has materials of value for minority-group and other students (45 Temple Place, Boston, MA 02111; Telephone, 617/357-9620; Fax, 617/338-1577; URL, http://www.nebhe.org). Remember, however, that e-mail is not always confidential. A number of organizations focus on gender-related issues. Two key organizations are the Association of Women in Science (http://www.awis.org) and the Society of Women Engineers (http://www.swe.org). They should be able to provide guidance or point you toward a related discipline-specific organization. Students with disabilities may obtain guidance from the following organizations: Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD); 614/488­4972. Promotes education, communication, and training. Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC); 800/848­4815. A focus on disability issues.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Higher Education and Adult Training for the Handicapped (HEATH), now renamed for Persons with Disabilities); 800/544­3284, 202/939­9320. Helps with transitions from high school to college, college to graduate school. Job Accommodation Network (JAN); 800/526­7234. How persons with a disability can be accommodated in the laboratory or workplace. National Information Center on Deafness; 202/451­5051. Resources for deaf and hearing-impaired students. President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities; 202/376­6200; www.pcepd.gov. Excellent reference source, with liaison person in each state. Bibliography For additional material, see the bibliography in the COSEPUP guide Careers in Science and Engineering: A Student Planning Guide to Grad School and Beyond (http://www2.nas.edu/cosepup). Doing Science Beveridge, W.I.B. 1950. The Art of Scientific Investigation. United States: Vintage Books. Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. 1995. On Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct in Research. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Medawar, P.B. 1979. Advice to a Young Scientist. United States: Basic Books. Peters, R.L. 1996. Getting What You Came For: The Smart Student's Guide to Earning a Master's or a PhD. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Presentations Briscoe, M.H. 1995. Preparing Scientific Illustrations: A Guide to Better Posters, Presentations, and Publications. New York: Springer-Verlag. Job-Hunting Bolles, R.N. 1997. The 1997 What Color Is Your Parachute? Berkeley, Calif.: Ten Speed Press. Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. 1996. Careers in Science and Engineering: A Student Planning Guide to Grad School and Beyond. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Hirsch, A. 1996. Interviewing: A National Business Employment Weekly Premier Guide. 2nd edition. New York: Wiley and Sons. Schwartz, B.B. ed. 1994. Graduate Student Packet for Students in Physics. College Park, Md. APS (American Physical Society) and AIP (American Institute of Physics). Yate, M. 1996. Knock 'Em Dead: The Ultimate Job Seeker's Handbook. Holbrook, Mass.: Adams Media Corp. Mentoring Association for Women in Science. 1993. Mentoring Means Future Scientists. Washington, D.C.: Association for Women in Science. Audi, R. 1994. "On the ethics of teaching and the ideals of learning," Academe, September­October: 27­36. Bird, S.J. 1994. "Overlooked aspects in the education of science professionals: Mentoring, ethics, and professional responsibility." J. Science Education and Technology 3:49­55.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Council of Graduate Schools. 1990. Research Student and Supervisor: An Approach to Good Supervisory Practice. Washington, D.C.: Council of Graduate Schools. ______. 1995. A Conversation About Mentoring: Trends and Models. Washington, D.C.: Council of Graduate Schools. Fort, C., Bird, S.J., and Didion, C.J. (eds.) 1993. A Hand Up: Women Mentoring Women in Science. Washington, D.C.: Association for Women in Science. Kanigel, R. 1986. Apprentice to Genius: The Making of a Scientific Dynasty. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press. Olmstead, M.A. 1993. "Mentoring new faculty: Advice to department chairs," CSWP, A Newsletter of the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics, Vol. 13, No. 1: 1, 8­11. Washington, D.C.: American Physical Society, August. Noe, R.A. 1988. "An investigation of the determinants of successful assigned mentoring," Personnel Psychology 41:457­479. Roberts, G.C. and Sprague, R.L. 1995. "To compete or to educate? Mentoring and the research climate," Professional Ethics Report VIII, 1:6­7, Fall. Zelditch, M. 1990. "Mentor roles," in Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Western Association of Graduate Schools, 11. Tempe, Ariz., March 16­18. Oral Communication Schloff, L. and Yudkin, M. 1992. Smart Speaking. New York: Plume. Stuart, C. 1989. How to Be an Effective Speaker. Chicago: NTC Publishing Group.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Time Management and Professional Development  Griessman, B.E. 1994. Time Tactics of Very Successful People. New York: McGraw-Hill. Hobfoll, S.E. and Hobfoll, I.H. 1994. Work Won't Love You Back: The Dual Career Couple's Survival Guide. New York: W.H. Freeman. Roesch, R. 1996. The Working Woman's Guide to Managing Time. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Gender, Cultural, and Disability Issues Association for Women in Science. 1995. A Hand Up: Women Mentoring Women in Science, 2nd edition. Washington, DC. Didion, C.J. 1993. "Letters of reference: an often-deciding factor in women's academic or career advancement." Journal of College Science Teaching 23 (1): 9­10. Katz, M. and Vieland, V. 1993. Get Smart! What You Should Know (But Won't Learn in Class) About Sexual Harassment and Sexual Discrimination. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York. Mitchell, R. 1993. The Multicultural Student's Guide to Colleges. New York: Noonday Press. National Research Council. 1989. A Common Destiny: Blacks and American Society. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. National Science Foundation. 1996. Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation. Rosser, S.V. 1990. Female-Friendly Science: Applying Women's Studies Methods and Theories to Attract Students. New York: Pergamon Press.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Sonnert, G. and Holton, G. 1995. Who Succeeds in Science? The Gender Dimension. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. Treisman, U. 1992. "Studying students studying calculus: A look at the lives of minority mathematics students in college," College Mathematics Journal 23 (5):362­72, November. Responsible Scientific Conduct Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. 1995. On Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct on Research, 2nd edition. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Elliott, D. and Stern, J.E., eds. 1997. Research Ethics: A Reader. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England. Korenman, S.G. and Shipp, A., eds. 1994. Teaching the Responsible Conduct of Research through a Case Study Approach: A Handbook for Instructors. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Medical Colleges. Macrina, F.L. 1995. Scientific Integrity: An Introductory Text with Cases. Washington, D.C.: ASM Press. Sigma Xi. 1986. Honor in Science. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina: Sigma Xi. "Special Issue on Research Ethics." 1995. Professional Ethics, Vol. 4, Nos. 3 & 4, Spring/Summer. Stern, J.E. and Elliott, D. 1997. The Ethics of Scientific Research: A Guidebook for Course Development. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England.

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Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: On being a Mentor to Students in Science and Engineering Teaching Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. 1995. Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. 1996. A National Conversation on Doctoral Education: An Emerging Consensus. Washington, D.C.: COSEPUP. McKeachie, W.J. 1994. Teaching Tips: A Guidebook for the Beginning College Teacher, 9th edition. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Co. Pregent, R. 1994. Charting Your Course: How to Prepare to Teach More Effectively. Madison, Wisc.: Magna Publications. Writing Booth, V. 1993. Communicating in Science: Writing a Scientific Paper and Speaking at Scientific Meetings, 2nd edition. New York: Cambridge University Press . Council of Biology Editors, Committee on Graduate Training in Scientific Writing. 1968. Scientific Writing for Graduate Students: A Manual on the Teaching of Scientific Writing. New York: Rockefeller University Press. Day, R.A. 1994. How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper, 4th edition. Phoenix: Oryx Press. Moriarty, M.E. 1997. Writing Science Through Critical Thinking. New York: Jones and Bartlett.

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