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Biographical Data

A. DOUGLAS ARMSTRONG is retired manager for pulp and paper feasibility at Georgia-Pacific Corp., where he served in various plant and management positions for over 40 years addressing operational and environmental concerns.

PATRICK R. ATKINS is director of environmental control at Alcoa. He joined Alcoa in Pittsburgh in 1972, after 4 years as a professor in environmental health engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he taught engineering, industrial hygiene, and ecology and directed M.S. and Ph.D. research projects for 23 students. In 1973, Atkins became Alcoa's manager of environmental control. He was named to his present position in 1980. Atkins also served as the company's chief environmental engineer from 1982 to 1984. Author of over 50 technical articles and editor of 2 books, he is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. Atkins represents Alcoa on the environmental committee of the International Primary Aluminum Institute, the Business Roundtable, National Association of Manufacturers, and other national and international groups. He is a registered professional engineer in the states of Texas and Pennsylvania and serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching industrial waste-treatment technology. Atkins has a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University.

KEITH M. BENTLEY is director of environmental engineering technical support at Georgia-Pacific Corp. In that capacity, he manages a group of engineers



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Page 142 Biographical Data A. DOUGLAS ARMSTRONG is retired manager for pulp and paper feasibility at Georgia-Pacific Corp., where he served in various plant and management positions for over 40 years addressing operational and environmental concerns. PATRICK R. ATKINS is director of environmental control at Alcoa. He joined Alcoa in Pittsburgh in 1972, after 4 years as a professor in environmental health engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he taught engineering, industrial hygiene, and ecology and directed M.S. and Ph.D. research projects for 23 students. In 1973, Atkins became Alcoa's manager of environmental control. He was named to his present position in 1980. Atkins also served as the company's chief environmental engineer from 1982 to 1984. Author of over 50 technical articles and editor of 2 books, he is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. Atkins represents Alcoa on the environmental committee of the International Primary Aluminum Institute, the Business Roundtable, National Association of Manufacturers, and other national and international groups. He is a registered professional engineer in the states of Texas and Pennsylvania and serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, teaching industrial waste-treatment technology. Atkins has a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. KEITH M. BENTLEY is director of environmental engineering technical support at Georgia-Pacific Corp. In that capacity, he manages a group of engineers

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Page 143 that provides technical expertise to Georgia-Pacific's plants and mills. Bentley has experience reviewing plant activities to ensure compliance with applicable regulations; assisting in the design and selection of environmental control equipment; developing environmental policy; conducting regulatory development and analysis; and negotiating emission permits, variances, and compliance schedules with various regulatory agencies. He has over 23 years of experience in environmental engineering, the last 17 with Georgia-Pacific. Bentley has also held leadership positions on various committees within the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry and the American Forest and Paper Association. He has a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of South Carolina. CHARLES G. CARSON III is vice president of environmental affairs at U.S. Steel. His responsibilities include overseeing U.S. Steel's environmental compliance and improvement activities and coordinating the company's relations with various environmental agencies and groups. Carson joined U.S. Steel in 1970 as a research engineer and progressed through a series of technical and management positions in various research and development areas. In 1985, he moved into U.S. Steel's commercial operations as manager of product development in the Tin Mill Products department. Carson was promoted in 1990 to general manager of Tin Mill Products. He has a B.S. in chemistry from Williams College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in metallurgy from The Pennsylvania State University. PRESTON S. CHIARO is vice president of technical services at Kennecott Corp. He is primarily responsible for Kennecott's compliance with all federal, state, and local environmental requirements for all of its active mining and mineral processing operations as well as for its exploration, acquisition, and reclamation activities. Chiaro also oversees environmental audits and due-diligence assessments, provides assistance for getting permits, helps to promote industry concerns among regulators, and promotes energy efficiency and waste-minimization awareness. He joined Kennecott in 1991 to help direct a massive cleanup of historic mine wastes at Kennecott Utah Copper near Salt Lake City. In October 1992, Chiaro was named Kennecott's vice president of environmental affairs. Prior to joining Kennecott, he managed a large environmental cleanup contract for Ebasco Environmental. Chiaro has a B.S. and M.S. (cum laude) in environmental engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is a registered professional engineer in five states. ROBERT A. FROSCH is a senior research fellow at Center for Science and International Affairs of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and senior fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. In 1989, he revived, redefined, and popularized the term industrial ecology, and his research has focused on this field in recent years, especially in metals-handling industries. In 1993, Frosch retired as vice president of General Motors Corp.,

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Page 144 where he was in charge of the North American Operations Research and Development Center. After doing research in underwater sound and ocean acoustics, he served for a dozen years in a number of government positions, including deputy director of Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense, assistant secretary of the Navy for research and development, assistant executive director of the United Nations Environment Program, and administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Frosch is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and holds a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Columbia University. ANN B. FULLERTON is president of The Fullerton Group, a media relations consulting firm. She has more than 10 years of product and program marketing experience for Fortune 500 companies, industry associations, and government programs. Fullerton's expertise includes design implementation and evaluation of marketing programs with substantive experience in the areas of high technology, science, and the environment. She has served as marketing advisor to senior management at AT&T, Northern Telecom, and Digital Equipment Corp. and has been recognized for her organizational and leadership abilities in taking ideas from concept to implementation. Fullerton has also served on the board of directors and chaired communications subcommittees of several industry associations, including the American Electronics Association, the Computer Business Equipment Manufacturers, the Center for Office Technology, and the Industry Cooperative for Ozone Layer Protection. She holds a B.S. (cum laude) in public relations from Boston University and an M.S. in communications management from Simmons College. SERGIO F. GALEANO is manager of environmental programs for Georgia-Pacific Corp. His responsibilities are in product safety and assurance; policy and technology issues in connection with the environmental attributes of products; and trade and competitiveness issues. Galeano also chairs various committees of domestic and international forest products industry groups. He has received a number of honorary awards, among them membership in Phi Kappa Phi and the 1995 TAPPI Environmental Division Technical Award for outstanding technical contributions in the area of environmental protection. Galeano holds more than a dozen patents and has published extensively. He has an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Havana and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering, respectively, from the University of Florida at Gainesville. Galeano is a registered professional engineer and a diplomat of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. THOMAS E. GRAEDEL is professor of industrial ecology at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, a position he assumed after 27 years as Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He was the

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Page 145 first atmospheric chemist to study the atmospheric reactions of sulfur and the concentration trends in methane and carbon monoxide. As a corrosion scientist, Graedel devised the first computer model to simulate the atmospheric corrosion of metals. This work led to a voluntary position as consultant to the Statue of Liberty Restoration Project in 1984-1986. One of the founders of the emerging discipline of industrial ecology, he co-authored the first textbook in the field and has lectured widely on its implementation and implications. Graedel has published 9 books and more than 200 scientific papers. He holds a B.S. from Washington University, an M.A. from Kent State University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. G. FRANK JOKLIK began his career as an exploration geologist with Kennecott Corp. in 1954, heading up minerals projects in Canada and the United States. After 10 years, he joined Amax to manage the development of the Mt. Newman iron ore mines, Western Australia, and other projects. Joklik was subsequently elected a corporate vice president. In 1974, he resumed his career with Kennecott and, after several promotions, became president in 1980. He continued in that role through several changes of ownership. He retired from Kennecott in June 1993 and now operates from his office in Salt Lake City. A highlight of his career was the revitalization of Bingham Canyon mine where, through cost reduction and investment in the replacement of antiquated plant, a high-cost, inefficient operation was converted into one of the world's lowest-cost, most-productive, and environmentally clean producers of copper and precious metals. Under his management, Kennecott developed five new precious and base-metal mines in the United States, discovered and defined the giant Lihir gold deposit in Papua New Guinea, and through acquisition became the leading coal producer in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Joklik is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a distinguished member of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. He was elected Copper Club Man of the Year for 1988 and, in 1991, received the AIME William Lawrence Saunders Gold Medal for distinguished service to the mining industry. Joklik was born in Vienna, Austria, and grew up in Australia. After schooling at Cranbrook, he attended the University of Sydney, where he received B.Sc. (First Class Honors) and Ph.D. degrees in geology. In 1953, he came to the United States as a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University. ROBERT A. LAUDISE is adjunct chemical director at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he is responsible for chemistry-related R&D throughout AT&T Bell Labs, adjunct professor of materials science at MIT, and adjunct professor of ceramics at Rutgers University. He has a special interest in green materials and processes. Laudise joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1956 and has served as director of materials research, physical and inorganic chemistry research, and materials and processing. His interests include solid state chemistry, materials science and con-

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Page 146 servation, and crystal growth. Laudise has spent considerable time studying hydrothermal crystallization and the preparation of piezoelectric, laser, nonlinear optical, and related materials. Most commercial processes for preparing crystalline quartz are based on his work. Laudise is the author of the book The Growth of Single Crystals and more than 150 publications on crystal growth and related fields. He holds 12 patents and has received numerous prizes and awards, including the A.D. Little Fellowship and the 1976 Sawyer Prize. Laudise is the past president of the International Organization of Crystal Growth, is a member of the American Chemical Society, National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He chairs the National Materials Advisory Board and is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Materials Research. Laudise has a B.S. in chemistry from Union College and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from MIT. KENNETH J. MARTCHEK is program manager of pollution prevention and life-cycle analysis for Alcoa. He reports to the corporate director of environmental affairs and is responsible for awareness, development, and promotion of waste-reduction and product-stewardship initiatives for Alcoa worldwide. Martchek joined Alcoa in 1979 after 3 years with U.S. Research Laboratories, where he was responsible for process simulations of ore processing and blast-furnace operations. As a senior project engineer at Alcoa Technical Center, he supervised the operation of pilot plant facilities in the production of high-purity aluminum and solar-grade silicon. Martchek joined the environmental engineering staff of Alcoa in 1983 and directed a number of commercial project installations in water and waste treatment. In 1992, he received Alcoa's Davis Award for the R&D, design, and successful startup of a biological treatment facility associated with a new, high-speed electrocoating operation. Prior to assuming his present position, Martchek served as engineering manager for Alcoa's effort to develop ceramic electronic packaging. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and American Society for Quality. Martchek has a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.S. in chemical and biochemical engineering from Rutgers University. He is a licensed professional engineer in the state of Pennsylvania. ELIZABETH H. MIKOLS is manager of environmental affairs for CBR-HCI Construction Materials Corp., one of the largest producers of portland cement in the United States and Canada. Prior to coming to CBR-HCI in 1989, she held environmental positions at Lonestar Industries, another major cement, concrete, and construction materials company. In addition to her 13 years in the cement industry, Mikols had 9 years of experience working in environmental regulatory agencies in New York and Connecticut. She participates on several environmental committees and task groups for industry associations and has delivered presentations at technical conferences and public meetings on a variety of environmental

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Page 147 subjects connected with the cement industry. Mikols is a member of the Air & Waste Management Association, a nationwide association of environmental professionals, and serves on the Dean's Strategic Advisory Council for the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a master's degree from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. ROBERT J. OLSZEWSKI is director of environmental affairs, forest resources, at Georgia-Pacific Corp. Prior to joining industry, he worked for 6 years as Florida's forest hydrologist. In that position, Olszewski was responsible for implementing the forestry non-point-source pollution element of the state's water-quality plan and actively trained Florida's forestry community in silvicultural best-management-practice applications. His next job was with the Florida Forestry Association, where his duties included working with the forestry community, environmental organizations, the Florida legislature, and federal, state, and local governments on a variety of environmental and land-use regulations affecting forestry operations in the state. In March 1993, Olszewski accepted a newly created position with Georgia-Pacific, working for the Forest Resources Business Unit and the Environmental Policy, Training, and Regulatory Group on environmental issues affecting forestry operations at the company. He assumed his current post in January 1996. Olszewski is active with the Society of American Foresters (SAF), having served as Florida section chairman and as chairman of Georgia SAF's Chattahoochee chapter, and is chairman of the American Forest and Paper Association's Forest Wetland and Nonpoint Source Committee and Global Forestry Committee. He has a B.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and an M.S. in forest hydrology from the University of Georgia, Athens. DEANNA J. RICHARDS is associate director of the National Academy of Engineering's Program Office and also directs the Academy's program on Technology and Environment (T&E). Hired in 1991 to launch the Academy's environmental effort, she has led groundbreaking work that has helped establish the field of industrial ecology. The T&E program has focused on technological trajectories of large-scale systems, as well as on best practices in environmental design and management in the manufacturing and service industries. Richards has directed several projects related to industry efforts to integrate environmental considerations in decision making. Before joining the NAE, Richards was an assistant professor of environmental engineering and worked for several years in that field. She has a B.S. (honors) in civil engineering from the University of Edinburgh and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in civil engineering, from the University of Pennsylvania. GAIL A. SMITH manages corporate environmental communications for Georgia-Pacific Corp., where she has worked since 1984. She is active in industry groups, serving on communications committees for the American Forest and Pa-

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Page 148 per Association and the Great Lakes Water Quality Coalition. Smith is also a member of the International Association of Business Communicators. She is a graduate of Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga., where she majored in business administration and English. JONATHAN R. SMITH JR. is president of Rigdon Engineering, a consumer products engineering and development firm. His career in the pulp and paper industry began in 1969, when he became research engineer at Chesapeake Corp. of Virginia. Smith later joined the Mead Corp. as senior consultant, corporate human and environmental protection department. He then held increasingly responsible positions at Georgia-Pacific Corp., becoming senior manager of environmental affairs in 1991. Smith has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and holds four U.S. patents. He is a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, a member of the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce. Smith has a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and did graduate work in systems engineering at Ohio University and in water-pollution control at Vanderbilt University. IAN M. TORRENS is head of power generation for Shell International in London, where he is responsible for business development activities involving use of Shell gas and coal fuels by electric utilities and independent electric power developers worldwide. He also represents Shell International Gas and Shell Coal International in a number of international bodies such as the International Energy Agency and the World Coal Institute. Prior to assuming his current position in 1995, Torrens was director of the Environment Control Business Unit at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). At EPRI, he directed R&D in several areas relating to electric power generation: SO2, NOx, and particulate control systems; CO2 mitigation; and waste and water management, including management of potentially toxic substances in air and water. Between 1973 and 1987, he was at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris, where he worked on energy issues in the OECD's International Environment Directorate. The author of three books and several papers, Torrens has a B.Sc. (first class honours) in physics from Queen's University, Belfast, and a Ph.D. in nuclear physics from the University of Cambridge. KURT E. YEAGER is president and chief executive officer of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). After joining EPRI in 1974, he held a series of R&D management positions before being named, in 1990, as senior vice president of technical operations, responsible for the integrated management of all EPRI technical programs. In 1994, Yeager became senior vice president for strategic development and, in 1995, executive vice president and chief operating officer. Before joining EPRI, he was director of energy R&D planning for the Environmental

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Page 149 Protection Agency's Office of Research and associate head of enviornmental systems development at the MITRE Corp. Yeager has a bachelor's degree from Kenyon College and completed postgraduate studies in chemistry and physics at Ohio State and the University of California at Davis. He is a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Nuclear Research Officers Program and a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.