D Committee and Staff Biographies

Committee

EDWARD N. BRANDT, JR., is Regents Professor and Director of the Center for Health Policy at the University of Oklahoma. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma Medical Center. Prior to assuming his current responsibilities in 1992, Dr. Brandt served as Executive Dean of the College of Medicine of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. From 1981 to 1984, Dr. Brandt was the Assistant Secretary for Health and U.S. Representative to the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (from 1982 to 1984). From 1985 to 1989, Dr. Brandt was President of the University of Maryland at Baltimore and Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Brandt has been a member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (1985-1989), a member of the Council of the Institute of Medicine (1986-1991) and Vice-Chairman of the Governing Council (19871991), and Chairman of the Medical Schools Section of the American Medical Association (1979-1981).

SHARON BARNARTT has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and is currently Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Gallaudet University, where she has taught for the past 16 years. Her primary research interest is the sociology of disability and deafness and focuses on three major areas: (1) the socioeconomic status of male and



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--> D Committee and Staff Biographies Committee EDWARD N. BRANDT, JR., is Regents Professor and Director of the Center for Health Policy at the University of Oklahoma. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma Medical Center. Prior to assuming his current responsibilities in 1992, Dr. Brandt served as Executive Dean of the College of Medicine of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. From 1981 to 1984, Dr. Brandt was the Assistant Secretary for Health and U.S. Representative to the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (from 1982 to 1984). From 1985 to 1989, Dr. Brandt was President of the University of Maryland at Baltimore and Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Brandt has been a member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (1985-1989), a member of the Council of the Institute of Medicine (1986-1991) and Vice-Chairman of the Governing Council (19871991), and Chairman of the Medical Schools Section of the American Medical Association (1979-1981). SHARON BARNARTT has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and is currently Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Gallaudet University, where she has taught for the past 16 years. Her primary research interest is the sociology of disability and deafness and focuses on three major areas: (1) the socioeconomic status of male and

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--> female deaf workers, (2) social movements in the deaf and disability communities, and (3) disability policy issues both in the United States and internationally. She coauthored the book Deaf President Now: The 1988 Revolution at Gallaudet University, and she has published a number of articles and made many professional presentations on her research topics of interest. She is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Disability, Development, and Education, and is a past president and board member of the Society for Disability Studies. CAROLYN BAUM is the Elias Michael Director and Assistant Professor for Occupational Therapy and Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Baum has served as President of the American Occupational Therapy Association and as President of the American Occupational Therapy Certification Board, and she has recently completed a term at the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health and on the McDonnel Science Foundation Task Force for Improving Cognitive Rehabilitation. Her research is on the relationship of activity and function in persons with cognitive impairment and chronic disease. She heads an interdisciplinary faculty that is contributing knowledge and training clinicians and rehabilitation scientists in developmental neuroscience, work performance and occupational competency, and aging and performance to understand the personal and environmental factors that contribute to the performance of everyday life. FAYE BELGRAVE is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Applied Social Psychology Program at George Washington University. Dr. Belgrave has conducted research in the area of psychosocial aspects of disability and chronic illness for over 12 years. Dr. Belgrave has been the Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator on several grants (National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research) on psychosocial aspects related to disability and rehabilitation among ethnic minorities. She has published extensively in this area. Dr. Belgrave received her Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Maryland in 1982. Prior to coming to George Washington University, she was a Senior Research Associate at the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C. Before that, she worked as a research associate at Howard University's Center for Sickle Cell Disease. Dr. Belgrave teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in social psychology and health psychology. She currently is on the editorial board of the Journal of Black Psychology and is an editorial consultant to several journals in the areas of disability and health. She is completing a book entitled Psychosocial Aspects of Disability and Chronic Illness Among African Americans. Dr. Belgrave received the American Psychological Association's Minority Fellowship

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--> Award for outstanding research on ethnic minorities (1993) and the Association of Black Psychologist's 1994 Distinguished Scholarship Award. In 1993, she was honored with a Distinguished Service Award for service to persons with disabilities by the Howard University Research and Training Center for Access to Rehabilitation and Economic Opportunity. CLIFFORD BRUBAKER has been Professor and Dean of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and Professor of Industrial Engineering, Orthopedic Surgery, and Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh since 1991. Before coming to the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Brubaker was Professor of Education and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia and Director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Wheeled Mobility. Dr. Brubaker has published more than 100 papers, chapters, and technical reports. He also has been awarded four U.S. patents. Most of his research and design efforts have been directed toward the improvement of wheelchairs and specialized seating for people with disabilities. Dr. Brubaker is a fellow of both the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) and the American Institute on Medical and Biological Engineering. He currently serves as the President of RESNA. He is also the Chairperson of the Steering Committee on Long-Range Planning for the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Brubaker received the Isabelle and Leonard H. Goldensen Technology Award from the United Cerebral Palsy Research and Education Foundation in 1995. DIANA CARDENAS is Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at the University of Washington. She is also the Project Director and Principal Investigator of the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) System, one of 18 model SCI centers funded by NIDRR. She is also Clinical Director of the Spinal Cord Injury Service and Director of the Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. Dr. Cardenas has conducted research in the area of spinal cord injury for the last 15 years, focusing on the physiology of the neurogenic bladder. She has published over 65 articles, chapters, and books, many in the area of spinal cord injury. She received the 1996 New Jersey School of Medicine National Teaching Award in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of a study (funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research) on the prevention of urinary tract infection in people with spinal cord injuries and recently published a study on the urodynamic findings associated with age and aging with SCI. Dr. Cardenas received her B.A. in 1969 from the University of Texas in Austin and her M.D. in 1973 from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical

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--> School in Dallas. She earned an M.S. in 1976 from the University of Washington, where she also completed her residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in 1976. She is currently on the Editorial Board of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, serves as a member of the Research Committee of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and serves on the Board of Directors of the American Spinal Injury Association. DUDLEY S. CHILDRESS received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri at Columbia. Following graduation, he worked with Westinghouse Electric Corporation, served in the U.S. Army, taught electrical engineering at the University of Missouri, and worked with an electrical firm in Austria. In 1967, he received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Northwestern University. His research concerned control and movement of the human eye; this work stimulated his interest in muscle mechanics, electromyography, and the human motor control system. In 1966, he joined the Orthopaedic Surgery Department at the Northwestern Medical School. He currently holds appointments as Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He directs the Prosthetics Research Laboratory (with the Lakeside VA Medical Center); the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research's Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center in Prosthetics and Orthotics; and the Prosthetics and Orthotics Education Program, all of which are connected with Northwestern University and located within the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. His current interests concern human movement, particularly human ambulation and aided ambulation, control mechanisms that permit subconscious control of multifunctional artificial arms, human mechanics measurement systems, and computer-aided engineering and manufacturing in prosthetics and orthotics. DONALD L. CUSTIS is currently the Senior Medical Advisor to the Paralyzed Veterans of America. From 1980 to 1984, he served as Chief Medical Director for the Veterans Administration, having begun work there in 1976 as the Assistant Chief Medical Director for Academic Affairs. He had retired that year as the U.S. Navy's Surgeon General, with the rank of Vice Admiral. He earned his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in 1942 and interned at Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago before serving on board a U.S. Navy attack-transport in the South Pacific. Following World War II, he obtained his graduate surgical education at the Mason Clinic in Seattle and then resumed a navy medical career, first as surgeon in a series of naval hospitals and then, in 1969-1970, as commanding officer of the Naval Combat Hospital in

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--> Danang, Vietnam, followed by command of the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. His honors and awards include the Presidential Award of the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit with Combat V, the Veterans Administration Exceptional Service Award, the Citation for Meritorious Service from the American Hospital Association, the Silver Medal Award of the American College of Hospital Administrators, the American Medical Association's Nathan Smith Davis Award, the Alumni Award of Merit from Northwestern, and honorary degrees from Albany Medical College and Wabash College, his alma mater. SUE K. DONALDSON is Dean and Professor of the School of Nursing and Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University. She received B.S.N. and M.S.N. degrees from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Washington. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, Dr. Donaldson was a Professor in the Department of Physiology at the School of Medicine and Professor and Chair of Nursing Research Center for Long-Term Care of the Elderly at the University of Minnesota. She continues to act as a consultant to the National Institute for Nursing Research and to universities around the country. Dr. Donaldson is a pioneer in nursing research and internationally known for her basic science research in cellular skeletal and cardiac muscle physiology. In 1992, Dr. Donaldson was inducted as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Donaldson is a member of the Institute of Medicine. DAVID GRAY is Professor of Health Sciences in the Program in Occupational Therapy at Washington University. Prior to assuming his current responsibilities, Dr. Gray had a distinguished career in government, where he served in numerous positions including Director of the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research in the U.S. Department of Education from 1986 to 1987 and Deputy Director of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has received many awards including the NIH Directors Award, the Paralyzed Veterans of America Career Achievement Award, and the National Head Injury Foundation's Outstanding Service Award. Dr. Gray received his B.A. in psychology from Lawrence University. He received an M.A. in experimental psychology from Western Michigan University and his Ph.D. in psychology and behavioral genetics from the University of Minnesota.

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--> DAVID E. KREBS is Professor of Physical Therapy and Clinical Investigation at the Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute of Health Professions in Boston, and Director of the hospital's Biomotion Laboratory. He also holds academic appointments in orthopaedics at Harvard Medical School and in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Krebs has more than one hundred publications and has been awarded more than $4 million as principal investigator on federal (National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research) and foundation research grants, primarily on the neural and biomechanical constraints of human locomotor control. He was the 12th Annual Eugene Michels Researcher's Forum Featured Speaker of the American Physical Therapy Association and received its 1994 Golden Pen Award for Distinguished Scientific Writing. He was the 1995 Steven J. Rose Visiting Professor at Washington University. Dr. Krebs received his B.S. in physical therapy and his M.A. in applied physiology from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. in pathokinesiology and physical therapy from New York University. ELLEN J. MACKENZIE is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She also directs the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy. Dr. MacKenzie's research has focused on methodological and policy-relevant issues related to patient outcomes following traumatic injury. Her early work involved the development and evaluation of tools for reliably measuring the severity of injury. These tools have been applied in several major research initiatives to evaluate the organization, financing, and performance of regionalized systems of trauma care. More recently, Dr. MacKenzie has focused on the evaluation of long-term outcomes following traumatic injury. Of particular interest to her is the delineation of factors (both medical and nonmedical) that explain variations in outcome. Her work has contributed to our knowledge of the economic and social impact of injuries and to our understanding of the personal and environmental factors that influence recovery, especially the return to work. MARGARET TURK is an Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse. She has a joint appointment in the Department of Pediatrics at the Health Science Center and is also Medical Director of St. Camillus' Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program. She serves as a physical medicine and rehabilitation consultant to Syracuse Development Center and ENABLE, the local United Cerebral Palsy Affiliate. She is a board member of ARISE, the Syracuse independent living center. In addition to her clinical

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--> responsibilities, Dr. Turk is involved in many facets of rehabilitation research. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on a study of secondary conditions of cerebral palsy in adults, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as coauthor of monographs and curricula on secondary conditions and aging with a disability. Dr. Turk is very active in the education of professional and academic organizations as to the importance of secondary conditions of disabilities in their research and patient care. Mostly recently, Dr. Turk has focused her research interests on practice parameters and outcome measurement in rehabilitation. She belongs to numerous committees at the state and national levels that have spearheaded innovative research and training on these topics. Additionally, Dr. Turk assisted the Paralyzed Veterans Association in developing their practice parameters for spinal cord injury rehabilitation. In the publication sphere, Dr. Turk sits on the editorial board for Muscle and Nerve. She is awaiting the release of The Health of Women with Physical Disabilities: Setting the Research Agenda for the 90s, a book that she edited with Drs. Krotoski and Nosek, and a chapter on outcome measurement in Outcome Measurement Research in Rehabilitation: Setting the Agenda, edited by Marcus Fuhrer. GLEN WHITE has been involved in the rehabilitation and independent living field for over 25 years. As Codirector and Director of Research at the Research and Training Center on Independent Living (for underserved populations), Dr. White has conducted research in the areas of housing, advocacy, developing community support for independent living centers, and prevention of secondary conditions. He has recently served under Presidents Bush and Clinton as a Board Member on the Corporation for National Service. Dr. White is currently First Vice-President of the American Disability Prevention and Wellness Association and President-Elect of the National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers. He also serves as a Board Member on the Paralyzed Veterans of America's Education and Training Foundation. Dr. White currently has a appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Life at the University of Kansas, where he teaches in the areas of behavioral and community psychology and disability studies. SAVIO L.-Y. WOO is the A.B. Ferguson Professor and Vice Chairman for Research, and Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He also holds concurrent positions as Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in the Department of Rehabilitation Science and

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--> Technology. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Woo was Professor of Surgery and Bioengineering at the University of California at San Diego and Director of Orthopaedic Bioengineering Laboratory at the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Woo's research interests include solid mechanics and biomechanics; experimental, theoretical, and numerical analyses of the nonlinear material properties of biological tissues; healing and repair of tendon, ligament, articular cartilage, and meniscus; and joint kinematics and the use of robotics technology. He has published extensively and has received many awards and distinctions for his research. He has served as President for the Orthopaedic Research Society, the American Society of Biomechanics, and the International Society for Fracture Repair and as Chairman for the Bioengineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the United States National Committee on Biomechanics, and the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Woo is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering. EDWARD YELIN is Codirector of the Education, Epidemiology, and Health Services Research Component of the Multipurpose Arthritis Center at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) and of the Disability Statistics Rehabilitation and Research Training Center. He is also a member of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the Institute for Health Policy Studies, and Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, all at UCSF. His research has emphasized the causes and consequences of disability, especially the impact of chronic disease on employment. He is the author of Disability and the Displaced Worker and numerous research articles. He received his A.B. in public affairs from the University of Chicago and his M.C.P. and Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of California at Berkeley. He is an active member of the Arthritis Foundation and the American College of Rheumatology. Dr. Yelin recently received both the Clarke Award for Outstanding Research from the Arthritis Foundation and the Outstanding Scholar Award from the American College of Rheumatology. WISE YOUNG is Director of the Neurosurgery Research Laboratories at New York University (NYU) and Bellevue Medical Center, and Professor of Neurosurgery, Physiology, and Biophysics at NYU Medical Center. He received his B.A. from Reed College, where he majored in biology and chemistry, was a member of Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society, and received the Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science. He received his Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Iowa and his M.D. from Stanford University. Dr. Young has authored

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--> over 100 journal articles. He is recipient of the Jacob Javits Neuroscience Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, the Wakeman Award for Research in the Neurosciences, and the Neurotrauma Society Service Award. IOM Staff ANDREW M. POPE is a Senior Staff Officer and Study Director in the Institute of Medicine's Division of Health Sciences Policy. With expertise in physiology, toxicology, and epidemiology, his primary interests focus on disability and the environmental and occupational influences on human health. As a Research Fellow in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Pope's research focused on the biochemical, neuroendocrine, and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences, and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed and edited numerous reports on environmental and occupational issues; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the inclusion of environmental health content in medical and nursing school curricula. THELMA L. COX is a project assistant in the Division of Health Sciences Policy. During her 7 years at the Institute of Medicine, she has also provided assistance to the Division of Health Care Services and the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. Ms. Cox has worked on several IOM projects, including Designing a Strategy for Quality Review and Assurance in Medicare; Evaluating the Artificial Heart Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Federal Regulation of Methadone Treatment; Legal and Ethical Issues Relating to the Inclusion of Women in Clinical Studies; and Review of the Fialuridine (FIAU/FIAC) Clinical Trials. In 1995, she received the National Research Council Recognition Award and, in 1994, an IOM Staff Achievement Award. GEOFF FRENCH is a Research Assistant in the Division of Health Sciences Policy; he has been with the Institute of Medicine for 2 years. His undergraduate degree is in history and anthropology, and he has completed his M.A. in national security studies at Georgetown University. VALERIE PETIT SETLOW is the Director of the Division of Health Sciences Policy. In this capacity, she is responsible for the development of public policy activities related to (a) biomedical research, including fun-

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--> damental science and clinical research; (b) infrastructure to support research; (c) drug development and regulation; (d) education, training, and mentoring of health professionals; and (e) the ethical, legal, and social implications of biomedical advances. Dr. Setlow received her B.S. in chemistry from Xavier University and her Ph.D. in molecular biology from Johns Hopkins University. She has conducted research in molecular hematology and virology and has had a distinguished career in government, serving in numerous positions including as Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Research programs at the National Institutes of Health, and in her last position, as Acting Director of the National AIDS Program Office. Her expertise includes molecular biology and genetics, health science program management, health policy analysis, and program development. She also holds an adjunct appointment at Howard University in the Department of Community and Family Medicine.

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