Appendixes



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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors Appendixes

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors This page in the original is blank.

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Marye Anne Fox, co-chair, is vice president for research and the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. Her recent research activities include organic photochemistry, electrochemistry, and physical organic mechanisms. She is a former associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Previously, she was also the director for the Center for Fast Kinetics Research, vice chairman of the National Science Board, and a member of the Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Galvin Committee. Dr. Fox is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and serves on several NAS committees, including the NAS Council Executive Committee and the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She is an NAS Councilor and a former member of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, and she served on the Committee on Criteria for Federal Support of Research and Development. She received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Dartmouth College. Edward M. Arnett, co-chair, is the Reynolds Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Duke University. Dr. Arnett was director of the Dukes Surface Science Center and previously held positions at the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard University, Western Maryland College, Max Levy and Company, and the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include acid-base behavior of organic compounds, solvent effects in organic chemistry, organic monolayers, and stereochemistry of aggregation. Dr. Arnett is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He chaired the National Research Council's Committee on Prudent

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors Practices for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Chemicals in Laboratories and was a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. Alexander Beveridge is the head of the chemistry section of the Vancouver Forensic Laboratory of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He has had 29 years of forensic chemistry casework experience. His primary research interest is the analysis of residues from explosives. He is a fellow of the Chemical Institute of Canada and a faculty member of the Open University of British Columbia. Dr. Beveridge earned his B.Sc. degree and Ph.D. in chemistry from Glasgow University and has an M.B.A. from the University of Alberta. Alan L. Calnan is a professor of law at Southwestern University in Los Angeles, California. Previously, he was an instructor of legal writing at Villanova University, a casualty litigation associate in Philadelphia, and a law clerk for Judge Donald E. Wieand of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. He has written a number of articles on tort law and related subjects and recently published a book, Justice and Tort Law, which explores tort law's moral foundations. He has been interviewed for radio stations broadcasting in both national and international markets and has been quoted frequently in such publications as the Los Angeles Times, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Toronto Sun, and USA Today on a variety of tort and product liability subjects. Mr. Calnan was listed in the 1996 edition of Who's Who Among America's Teachers. He is a member of the Pennsylvania State Bar. Mr. Calnan earned a B.A. in history from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania and J.D. from Syracuse University. Tung-ho Chen is a research chemist at the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny Arsenal. His research interests include physical and analytical chemistry of energetic and related materials, multicomponent analysis, and analysis of explosion residues. Dr. Chen is a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization's Ad Hoc Group of Specialists on Detection of Explosives. He is recognized for his work on tagging of plastic explosives. He earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Louisville. Herbert S. Eleuterio is a visiting professor in the engineering department at the National University of Singapore. Previously, he held a number of research and management positions at DuPont Company, including director of new technologies and technical director of the Atomic Energy Division. His research expertise includes reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, polymer chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. He has been the recipient of several honors and awards, including the 1995 National Science and Technology Medal of Singapore and the 1995

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors Lavoisier Medal for Technical Achievement. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Michigan State University. William M. Haynes is the retired director of the Analytical Science Center at the Monsanto Company. He previously held a series of research and research management positions at Monsanto and taught at Southeast Missouri State College. His research interests are in analytical chemistry, including polarographic analysis, ion selective electrodes, and industrial hygiene sampling and analysis. He received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Oklahoma State University. Robert B. Hopler operates Powderman Consulting Inc. in Oxford, Maryland. He has 35 years of technical and managerial experience in the explosives field with Dyno Nobel Inc., Ireco Inc., and Hercules Powder Company. He also served as the Dyno contact with the Federal Bureau of Investigation Explosives Group, Federal Aviation Administration explosives personnel, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms laboratories. His areas of expertise include ammonium nitrate, packaged explosives, and detonators. He has published numerous papers, taught courses, and made presentations on explosives and detonators. He is a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers and of the International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators and is the former secretary of the International Society of explosive Engineers. He received a B.S. and M.S. in mining engineering, with graduate research on ammonium nitrate/fuel oil blasting agents, from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. Alexander MacLachlan is retired deputy undersecretary of energy for research management and retired senior vice president for research and development at the DuPont Company. His areas of expertise include management, economics, chemical reactions and kinetics, environment, and health and safety. Dr. MacLachlan is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and currently serves as a member of the Chemical Engineering Peer Committee. He is a member of the National Research Council Steering Committee on Building an Environmental Management Science Program and previously served on the Steering Committee on Product Liability and Innovation. He received his Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lyle O. Malotky is the scientific advisor to the associate administrator for civil aviation security at the Federal Aviation Administration. Previously, he was manager of the Aviation Security Technology Branch and head chemical engineer for the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Center. His specialty is terrorist threats and capabilities, aviation security, and explosives detection and analysis. Dr. Malotky has served on numerous international and intergovernmental committees on the application of technology to the battle against terrorism. He received his Ph.D. in polymer science from the University of Akron.

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors David W. McCall is retired director of the Chemical Research Laboratory at AT&T Bell Laboratories. His educational background is in physical chemistry, and his research expertise is in the areas of nuclear magnetic resonance, diffusion in liquids, polymer relaxation, dielectric properties, and materials for communications systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on a variety of National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Polymer Science and Engineering, and is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board. He earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Douglas B. Olson is associate director for research and development at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. His educational background is in physical chemistry, and his research interests include chemical kinetics, combustion, and explosive systems. Dr. Olson has written or contributed to more than 200 publications and reports, including many on explosives safety and performance testing. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. Jimmie C. Oxley is deputy director of the Gordon Research Conferences and an adjunct professor of chemistry at the University of Rhode Island, and has been a visiting scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Previously, she was an associate professor in the chemistry department at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), where she was one of the founding investigators in the Research Center for Energetic Materials, founder and head of the NMIMT thermal hazards group, and developer of a Ph.D. program in explosives chemistry. Her research interests include thermal decomposition of energetic materials, ammonium nitrate chemistry, and improvised explosive devices. She is the author of more than 40 papers on the subject of energetic materials, the presenter of nearly 100 lectures, and the organizer of numerous national symposia. Dr. Oxley is also a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. She received her Ph.D. in organometallic chemistry from the University of British Columbia. Robert M. Pentz is director of the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Western Region, which is operated for the National Institute of Justice by the Aerospace Corporation. In this capacity, he provides technical support services to senior law enforcement officials. In his 27-year career at the Aerospace Corporation, he has primarily been responsible for application of satellite technology to military support architectures. Previously, he worked at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company and the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. Mr. Pentz earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors Anthony J. Silvestri has retired from positions as vice president of Mobil Research and Development Corporation and general manager for environmental health and safety at Mobil Oil Corporation, where he was responsible for toxicology and product safety functions. During his career with Mobil, he worked in the areas of catalysis, process research and technical service, development of fuels and lubricants, and production of synthetic fuels. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Pennsylvania State University. Judith Bannon Snow leads the High Explosives Science and Technology group at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is involved with explosives synthesis, formulation, chemical analysis, mechanical properties testing, micro-mechanical physics, nonshock initiation, deflagration to detonation theory, slow combustion, thermal studies, safety assessment, performance assessment, aging studies, and demilitarization of energetic materials. Before coming to Los Alamos, she spent 10 years at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in New London, Connecticut, where she directed the Marine Optics Laboratory. Previously, she did nonlinear optics research in applied physics at Yale University. Dr. Snow has two patent awards and numerous scientific publications in laser spectroscopy, microparticle scattering, and nonlinear optics. She earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Wesleyan University and was a Sloan Fellow at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, where she received an M.S. in management. Frank H. Stillinger is a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, and a visiting faculty member at Princeton Materials Institute. His research interests include statistical mechanics of liquids and amorphous solids, phase transition theory, theoretical methods in quantum chemistry, and computer simulation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Mathematical Challenges from Theoretical/Computational Chemistry, which he chaired. He earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from Yale University. Andrew E. Taslitz is a professor of law at the Howard University School of Law, where he teaches a variety of courses, including criminal law, criminal procedure, and criminal evidence law. Previously, he was a visiting legal writing instructor at Villanova University School of Law; a Litigation Department associate for the firm of Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis; and an assistant district attorney in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. The focus of his more than 15 years of writing and practice has been on the cultural, political, economic, and practical implications of prosecuting violent crime. He is the author of Constitutional Criminal Procedure (1997) and numerous articles and book chapters on scientific evidence, police investigatory practices, and jury reasoning processes. He is a member of the American Association of Law Schools' Evidence Section Advisory Board and of the American Bar Association (ABA) Criminal

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Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings: An Integrated National Strategy for Marking, Tagging, Rendering Inert, and Licensing Explosives and Their Precursors Justice Section's (CJS) Committee on Rules of Criminal Procedure and Evidence, and he is co-chair of the ABA CJS Committee on Race and Racism in the Criminal Justice System. He received a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.