Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

RICHARD S. MULLER (chair) is professor emeritus of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and co-director and co-founder of The Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center of the University of California, Berkeley. He was awarded an M.E. from Stevens Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics and electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He has been awarded NATO and Fulbright Research Fellowships at the Technical University, Munich, Germany; the Alexander von Humboldt Senior-Scientist Award; the University of California, Berkeley, Citation; the Stevens Institute of Technology Renaissance Award; the Transducers '95 Career Achievement Award; and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 1998 Cledo Brunetti Award. Dr. Muller is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Materials Advisory Board, the board of the Transducers Research Foundation, and the Advisory Committee for the Electron-Devices Society of IEEE, and he is editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. He is also a life fellow and distinguished lecturer of the IEEE, the chairman of the Sensors Advisory Board, and a trustee of the Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Muller is the author or co-author of more than 200 technical papers and conference presentations and the owner of 15 patents.

MICHAEL ALBIN is currently the director of science and technology at the Applied Biosystems Division of Perkin Elmer. He received a B.S. in chemistry from The Polytechnic Institute of New York and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University. Following postdoctoral studies pertaining to the study of electron transfer mechanisms at California Institute of Technology, he has pursued an industrial career centered on the interface between chemistry and instrumentation in a number of fields. He joined Applied Biosystems in 1989 where he was involved in the development and commercialization of capillary electrophoresis systems and chemistries for three years. In the company's Science and Technology Group, he led the development and implementation of applications of microtechnology, including a three year, $15 million Advanced Technology Program (ATP) for the development of integrated, microgenetics systems. He is directly responsible for the technical assessment of advanced technologies and markets.

PHILLIP W. BARTH is a project engineer in the Chemical Systems Department of Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. He was awarded a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame and a M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. His research activities include the development of MEMS devices for ink-jet printers. He holds 11 issued patents pertaining to MEMS technologies.

SELDEN B. CRARY is research scientist in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and president of Michigan Microsensor. He was awarded a Sc.B. from Brown University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington. His research concerns the modeling of microsensors and microactuators and the computational optimal design of experiments.

DENICE D. DENTON is the dean of engineering and a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. She received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from M.I.T. Her current interests include plasma deposition of polymers and the use of micromachining in solid state actuator design. Dr. Denton was co-director of the National Institute for Science Education in 1995-1996. She is a recipient of the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the American Society of Engineering Education AT&T Foundation Teaching Award, the W.M. Keck Foundation Engineering Teaching Excellence Award, the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) George Westinghouse Award, and the IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Teaching Award.

KAREN W. MARKUS is director of the MEMS Technology Applications Center of MCNC and chairman of the board and executive director of the HI-MEMS Alliance, which is a First Round Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). She was awarded a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California.

PAUL MCWHORTER is the technical and programmatic leader of the Intelligent Micromachine Program at the Sandia National Laboratory, a program that uses Sandia's state-of-the-art 33,000 square foot microelectronics clean room to pursue a variety of MEMS technologies and components for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and government



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 60
--> Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members RICHARD S. MULLER (chair) is professor emeritus of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and co-director and co-founder of The Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center of the University of California, Berkeley. He was awarded an M.E. from Stevens Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics and electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He has been awarded NATO and Fulbright Research Fellowships at the Technical University, Munich, Germany; the Alexander von Humboldt Senior-Scientist Award; the University of California, Berkeley, Citation; the Stevens Institute of Technology Renaissance Award; the Transducers '95 Career Achievement Award; and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 1998 Cledo Brunetti Award. Dr. Muller is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Materials Advisory Board, the board of the Transducers Research Foundation, and the Advisory Committee for the Electron-Devices Society of IEEE, and he is editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. He is also a life fellow and distinguished lecturer of the IEEE, the chairman of the Sensors Advisory Board, and a trustee of the Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Muller is the author or co-author of more than 200 technical papers and conference presentations and the owner of 15 patents. MICHAEL ALBIN is currently the director of science and technology at the Applied Biosystems Division of Perkin Elmer. He received a B.S. in chemistry from The Polytechnic Institute of New York and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University. Following postdoctoral studies pertaining to the study of electron transfer mechanisms at California Institute of Technology, he has pursued an industrial career centered on the interface between chemistry and instrumentation in a number of fields. He joined Applied Biosystems in 1989 where he was involved in the development and commercialization of capillary electrophoresis systems and chemistries for three years. In the company's Science and Technology Group, he led the development and implementation of applications of microtechnology, including a three year, $15 million Advanced Technology Program (ATP) for the development of integrated, microgenetics systems. He is directly responsible for the technical assessment of advanced technologies and markets. PHILLIP W. BARTH is a project engineer in the Chemical Systems Department of Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. He was awarded a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame and a M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. His research activities include the development of MEMS devices for ink-jet printers. He holds 11 issued patents pertaining to MEMS technologies. SELDEN B. CRARY is research scientist in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and president of Michigan Microsensor. He was awarded a Sc.B. from Brown University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington. His research concerns the modeling of microsensors and microactuators and the computational optimal design of experiments. DENICE D. DENTON is the dean of engineering and a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. She received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from M.I.T. Her current interests include plasma deposition of polymers and the use of micromachining in solid state actuator design. Dr. Denton was co-director of the National Institute for Science Education in 1995-1996. She is a recipient of the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the American Society of Engineering Education AT&T Foundation Teaching Award, the W.M. Keck Foundation Engineering Teaching Excellence Award, the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) George Westinghouse Award, and the IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Teaching Award. KAREN W. MARKUS is director of the MEMS Technology Applications Center of MCNC and chairman of the board and executive director of the HI-MEMS Alliance, which is a First Round Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). She was awarded a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California. PAUL MCWHORTER is the technical and programmatic leader of the Intelligent Micromachine Program at the Sandia National Laboratory, a program that uses Sandia's state-of-the-art 33,000 square foot microelectronics clean room to pursue a variety of MEMS technologies and components for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and government

OCR for page 60
--> agencies. This program is one of the leading developers of MEMS technologies. Dr. McWhorter has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas and a M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He has more than 50 technical publications and has received five IEEE best paper awards, two R&D 100 Awards, and Industry Week's ''Top Technology of the Year" award. ROBERT E. NEWNHAM is associate director of the Intercollege Materials Research Laboratory and Alcoa Professor of Solid State Science at The Pennsylvania State University. He was chairman of the Solid State Science Program for 18 years. Dr. Newnham is also affiliated with the Ceramic Science Section of the Materials Science and Engineering Department, where he teaches courses in crystal chemistry, crystal physics, and electroceramics. His research interests are structure-property relations, electroceramics, and composite materials for electronic applications. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Newnham is the author of four books, more than 400 research papers, and was as co-editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society for a number of years. He has been an invited speaker at many meetings, especially those concerned with composite transducers and smart materials. RICHARD S. PAYNE is the director of manufacturing for the Micromachined Products Division of Analog Devices, Incorporated, where the first dedicated wafer fabrication line for surface micromachined devices was built. He has worked in a variety of management positions at Analog Devices for 17 years and at Bell Laboratories for 10 years before that. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a recipient of the J.J. Ebers Award. He earned an A.B. in physics from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in physics from Yale University.