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UL for Infants

0–12 months

Not possible to establish; source of intake should be formula and food only

UL for Children

1–3 years

10 mg/day of niacin

4–8 years

15 mg/day of niacin

9–13 years

20 mg/day of niacin

UL for Adolescents

14–18 years

30 mg/day of niacin

UL for Pregnancy

14–18 years

30 mg/day of niacin

19 years and older

35 mg/day of niacin

UL for Lactation

14–18 years

30 mg/day of niacin

19 years and older

35 mg/day of niacin

Special Considerations

A review of the literature identified individuals with the following conditions as being distinctly susceptible to the adverse effects of excess niacin intake: hepatic dysfunction or a history of liver disease, diabetes mellitus, active peptic ulcer disease, gout, cardiac arrhythmias, inflammatory bowel disease, migraine headaches, and alcoholism. Therefore, people with these conditions may not be protected by the UL for niacin for the general population.

Intake Assessment

On the basis of data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey, the highest mean intake of niacin from diet and supplements for any life stage and gender group was 39 mg/day. This intake was being consumed by men aged 31 through 50 years, women over age 70, and pregnant women aged 14 through 55 years. The highest reported intake at the ninety-fifth percentile was 77 mg/day in women aged 51 through 70 years (see Appendix H). Niacin is available over the counter in dosages ranging up to 100 mg or more (in the immediate-release form).



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