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To ensure a milk B6 concentration of 0.13 mg/L, it is estimated that about five times that amount of B6 must be consumed in addition to the EAR of 1.1 mg/day.

B6EAR and RDA Summary, Lactation

In light of the evidence that low maternal intakes could lead to compromised B6 status in the infant (Borschel, 1995), it would be prudent to add 0.6 mg of B6 to the EAR of 1.1 mg for nonpregnant women, giving an EAR for lactation of 1.7 mg/day of B6. Because this is an approximation based on a number of assumptions, no adjustment is made for adolescent females who are lactating.

EAR for Lactation

14–18 years

1.7 mg/day of vitamin B6

 

19–30 years

1.7 mg/day of vitamin B6

 

31–50 years

1.7 mg/day of vitamin B6

The RDA for B6 is set by assuming a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10 percent (see Chapter 1) because information is not available on the standard deviation of the requirement for B6; the RDA is defined as equal to the EAR plus twice the CV to cover the needs of 97 to 98 percent of the individuals in the group (therefore, for B6 the RDA is 120 percent of the EAR).

RDA for Lactation

14–18 years

2.0 mg/day of vitamin B6

 

19–30 years

2.0 mg/day of vitamin B6

 

31–50 years

2.0 mg/day of vitamin B6

INTAKE OF VITAMIN B6

Food Sources

Data obtained from the 1995 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals indicates that the greatest contribution to vitamin B6 intake of the U.S. adult population comes from fortified, ready-to-eat cereals; mixed foods (including sandwiches) with meat, fish, or poultry as the main ingredient; white potatoes and other starchy vegetables; and noncitrus fruits (Table 7-1). Especially rich sources are highly fortified cereals; beef liver and other organ meats; and highly fortified, soy-based meat substitutes.



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