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UL for Children

1–3 years

30 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

4–8 years

40 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

9–13 years

60 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

UL for Adolescents

14–18 years

80 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

UL for Pregnancy

14–18 years

80 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

19 years and older

100 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

UL for Lactation

14–18 years

80 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

19 years and older

100 mg/day of vitamin B6as pyridoxine

Special Considerations

A review of the literature failed to identify special subgroups that are distinctly susceptible to sensory neuropathy after excess pyridoxine intake.

Intake Assessment

Based on data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey (Appendix H), 9 mg/day was the highest mean intake of B6 from food and supplements reported for any life stage and gender group; this was the reported intake of pregnant females aged 14 through 55 years. The highest reported intake at the ninety-fifth percentile was 21 mg/day in pregnant females aged 14 through 55 years, most of which is pyridoxine from supplements. B6 (pyridoxine) is available over the counter in many dosages ranging up to 100 mg or more.

Risk Characterization

The risk of adverse effects resulting from excess intake of B6 from food and supplements appears to be very low at the highest intakes noted above. Increased risks are likely to result from large intakes of PN used to treat conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, painful neuropathies, seizures, premenstrual syndrome, asthma, and sickle cell disease. The UL is not meant to apply to individuals who are being treated with PN under close medical supervision.



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