Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

William L. Graf, Chair, is Regents Professor of Geography at Arizona State University. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in physical geography and a minor in water resources management. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and policy for public land and water. His geomorphologic research and teaching has focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes and morphology, and contaminant transport and storage in river sediments, especially in dryland rivers. In the area of public policy he has emphasized the interaction of science and decisionmaking, and resolution of conflicts between economic development and environmental preservation. He has published more than 100 papers, articles, book chapters, and reports. He has served the National Research Council in numerous capacities, including membership on the Water and Science Technology Board.

Clifton J. Aichinger is administrator of Minnesota's Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District and one of the founding partners of the Phalen Chain of Lakes Watershed Management project, a pioneering initiative in an urban-suburban watershed. He previously served as an environmental planner for the city of St. Paul and a natural resources planner for the Dakota County Planning Department. He received a B.S. in Recreation Resource Management from the University of Minnesota in 1971.

Blake P. Anderson received a B.S. in civil engineering from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, and has pursued graduate work at California State University, Long Beach, and California State Polytechnic University,



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--> Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members William L. Graf, Chair, is Regents Professor of Geography at Arizona State University. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in physical geography and a minor in water resources management. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and policy for public land and water. His geomorphologic research and teaching has focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes and morphology, and contaminant transport and storage in river sediments, especially in dryland rivers. In the area of public policy he has emphasized the interaction of science and decisionmaking, and resolution of conflicts between economic development and environmental preservation. He has published more than 100 papers, articles, book chapters, and reports. He has served the National Research Council in numerous capacities, including membership on the Water and Science Technology Board. Clifton J. Aichinger is administrator of Minnesota's Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District and one of the founding partners of the Phalen Chain of Lakes Watershed Management project, a pioneering initiative in an urban-suburban watershed. He previously served as an environmental planner for the city of St. Paul and a natural resources planner for the Dakota County Planning Department. He received a B.S. in Recreation Resource Management from the University of Minnesota in 1971. Blake P. Anderson received a B.S. in civil engineering from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, and has pursued graduate work at California State University, Long Beach, and California State Polytechnic University,

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--> Pomona. He is a registered civil engineer and a certified wastewater treatment plant operator in California. Mr. Anderson is the Chief Operations Officer for the County Sanitation Districts of Orange County. He has been a leader of the Watershed Management Committee of the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies, and in this role has testified before Congress and written on the concept of watershed protection as a management tool for state and local governments. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Water Environment Federation. Gaboury Benoit is an associate professor in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. His research includes trace metal chemistry, chemical spectation, nonpoint source pollution, aquatic chemistry, environmental colloid chemistry, and watershed management. He received a B.S. in geochemistry in 1978 from Yale University; an M.S. in civil engineering (water resources) from Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography in 1988 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Peter A. Bisson is an aquatic biologist at the Forestry Sciences Laboratory of the USDA Forest Service in Olympia, Washington. His research includes studies of fish populations and communities, stream habitats and food webs, riparian zones, and land-water interactions. Dr. Bisson is president of the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society and holds affiliate faculty appointments at the University of Washington and Oregon State University. He received a B.A. in environmental biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1967 and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in fisheries and wildlife from Oregon State University in 1969 and 1975, respectively. Margot W. Garcia is an associate professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Virginia Commonwealth University. She was chair of the department from 1989 to 1992. She has done research in the area of environmental and natural resource planning and was vice-chair of the Water Quality 2000 steering committee. She has written numerous articles and is co-editor of the book Public Involvement and Social Impact Assessment. She majored in botany at the University of California, Berkeley, until 1960, received a B.S. in biology from the University of New Mexico in 1961, an M.S. in botany from the University of Wisconsin, Madison; in 1966, and a Ph.D. in watershed management from the University of Arizona in 1980. James P. Heaney is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He was formerly in the Department of Environmental Engineering Science and director of the Water Resources Research Center at the University of Florida. As a water

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--> resources engineer, he has a long-term interest in applying systems analysis techniques to water resources and watershed planning. His research interests include water resources and environmental decision support systems, risk management and engineering design and operation, and optimization of water and environmental systems. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1962 and an M.S. and Ph.D. in the same field from Northwestern University in 1965 and 1968, respectively. Carol A. Johnston is a senior research associate at the Natural Resources Research Institute of the University of Minnesota, Duluth. Her research in landscape ecology, geographic information systems, and the biogeochemistry of wetlands and watersheds has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, Sea Grant, the National Park Service, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and other organizations. Her professional experience includes positions at Cornell University, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She has served NRC as a member of the Committee on Characterization of Wetlands and as vice-chair of the Water Science and Technology Board. She received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in soil science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1978 and 1982, respectively. Leonard J. Lane is a hydrologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture' s Agricultural Research Service and an adjunct associate professor of renewable natural resources at the University of Arizona. His research interests include the hydrology of semiarid watersheds, runoff and sedimentation simulation models incorporating geomorphic features, and improved erosion prediction technology. He received a B.S. in 1970 and an M.S. in 1972 from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Colorado State University in 1975. Carolyn Hardy Olsen received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Wyoming in 1963. She received an M.S. in environmental engineering from the Southern Illinois University in 1976. She has over 25 years of experience in planning, design, and construction of water and wastewater projects. She served as Commissioner of Water and Pollution Control for City of Atlanta for six years and was responsible for the treatment and distribution of potable water, treatment of wastewater, and the long-range water resources and water conservation programs. Ms. Olsen is a member of the Water Quality 2000 Committee and the National Drinking Water Advisory Council. Her experience includes extensive environmental work with major governmental jurisdictions and a state environmental protection agency. She is a registered civil engineer in California and a registered professional engineer in Illinois and Georgia. Gary W. Petersen is a professor of soil and land resources in the Depart-

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--> ment of Agronomy in the College of Agricultural Sciences and co-director of the Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources in the Environmental Resources Research Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. His research interests have been primarily in the areas of pedology, landscape and watershed processes, land use, geographic information systems, and remote sensing. He has worked closely with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in the areas of mapping, correlation, characterization, and interpretation. He is president of the Soil Science Society of America. He received a B.S. in soils in 1961, an M.S. in soil chemistry in 1963, and a Ph.D. in soil genesis and morphology in 1965 from the University of Wisconsin. Max J. Pfeffer is an associate professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at Cornell University. His research has focused on the social aspects of agriculture, the environment, and development planning. He has done work on the social dimensions of watershed planning within the New York City watershed. He received a B.A. in sociology from the University of Colorado, Boulder, in 1976 and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1979 and 1986, respectively. Leonard Shabman is professor of resource and environmental economics and director of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Shabman has conducted economic research over a wide range of topics in natural resource and environmental policy, with emphasis in six general areas: coastal resources management; planning, investment, and financing of water resource development; flood hazard management; federal and state water planning; water quality management; and fisheries management. He was an economic advisor to the Water Resources Council in 1977-1978 and scientific advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Civil Works in 1984-1985. He received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1972 from Cornell University. Jack Stanford is director of the Flathead Lake Biological Station and Bierman Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana. He is an expert with extensive field experience in the ecology of lakes and streams. He has done research on many aspects of limnology with a special focus on nutrient cycling by algae and heterotrophic bacteria, benthic ecology, and hyporheic ecology. He received a B.S. and an M.S. from Colorado State University in 1969 and 1971, respectively, and a Ph.D. in limnology from the University of Utah in 1975. Stanley W. Trimble is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. He specializes in human-induced soil erosion and associated stream changes with particular emphasis on water and sediment budgets. He has been visiting professor at the Universities of Chicago, Vienna, Oxford, and

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--> London (University College), and was a research hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey from 1973-1984. He is presently joint editor of Catena, an international journal of soils, hydrology, and geomorphology. Since 1978, Trimble has owned and managed a 200-acre farm in Tennessee. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Alabama and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Georgia in 1969 and 1973, respectively.

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