Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Consultants

Harold M. Agnew served as president of General Atomics and director of Los Alamos National Laboratory before his retirement and is now an adjunct professor at the University of California, San Diego. His primary interests relate to nuclear physics and its application to defense, energy, and biological sciences. He worked with Enrico Fermi on the first nuclear chain reaction and assisted in the development of the atomic bomb. He has served on the White House Science Council and currently serves on General Atomic Company's advisory board. Dr. Agnew has received numerous awards, including the Fermi Award from DOE for his contributions to nuclear physics, and he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. He received an A.B. degree from the University of Denver and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago.

John F. Ahearne is the director of the Sigma Xi Center for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, a lecturer in public policy and adjunct professor in civil and environmental engineering at Duke University, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He has served as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, systems analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Defense. Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Advisory Board and the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University and his Ph.D. degree in physics from Princeton University.



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--> Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Consultants Harold M. Agnew served as president of General Atomics and director of Los Alamos National Laboratory before his retirement and is now an adjunct professor at the University of California, San Diego. His primary interests relate to nuclear physics and its application to defense, energy, and biological sciences. He worked with Enrico Fermi on the first nuclear chain reaction and assisted in the development of the atomic bomb. He has served on the White House Science Council and currently serves on General Atomic Company's advisory board. Dr. Agnew has received numerous awards, including the Fermi Award from DOE for his contributions to nuclear physics, and he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. He received an A.B. degree from the University of Denver and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. John F. Ahearne is the director of the Sigma Xi Center for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, a lecturer in public policy and adjunct professor in civil and environmental engineering at Duke University, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He has served as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, systems analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Defense. Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Advisory Board and the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University and his Ph.D. degree in physics from Princeton University.

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--> Francis M. Alcorn is manager of nuclear criticality safety with BWX Technologies in Lynchburg, VA. His professional interests include criticality evaluations and calculations, nuclear safety audits, nuclear fuel costs, and critical experiments analysis. He is a member of the Executive Committee on Nuclear Criticality Safety and the ANS-8 of the American Nuclear Society, which writes American National Standards for nuclear criticality safety. He also has served as past chairman of the society's Nuclear Criticality Safety Division. He received a B.S. in nuclear engineering from North Carolina State University and an MBA from Lynchburg College. Maurice W. Angvall served as Bechtel's manager of estimating for the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office and for Bechtel National Inc. in San Francisco prior to his retirement. He has 38 years of experience in construction management, design engineering, project control, estimating, and financial analysis on various industrial and nuclear facilities and defense related engineering and construction projects. He received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota and his MBA in finance from the University of California at Berkeley. Robert M. Bernero recently retired from 23 years of service with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), where he held numerous positions up to director of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. Prior to joining the USNRC, he worked for the General Electric Company in nuclear technology. He currently consults on nuclear safety related matters, and serves as a member of the Commission of Inquiry for an international review of Swedish nuclear regulatory activities. His professional expertise includes licensing, inspection, and environmental review of industrial, medical, academic, and commercial uses of radioisotopes. He received a B.A. degree from St. Mary of the Lake (Illinois), a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois, and an M.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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--> Joseph S. Byrd is distinguished professor emeritus of electrical and computer engineering and the University of South Carolina and an expert consultant in robotics for the International Union of Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program. Prior to joining the faculty at South Carolina, he managed the robotics technology group and the engineering development Group at the DuPont Savannah River Laboratory. His professional interests include robotics development and the application of robotics to environmental remediation. He has received several professional awards including the J.W. Lathrop Outstanding Electrical Engineering Educator Award, the Ray Goertz Award, and the Samuel Litman Distinguished Engineering Professor of Engineering award. He received a B.S. degree from Clemson University and a M.S. degree from the University of South Carolina, both in electrical engineering. Robert L. Dillon served in various management assignments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office at Hanford until his retirement. His professional interests include corrosion product transport in aqueous, organic, and liquid metal coolants, stress corrosion, and decontamination. He received a B.A. degree in chemistry from Reed College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, both in physical chemistry, from Northwestern University. G. Brian Estes is the former director of construction projects, Westinghouse Hanford Company, where he managed construction projects in support of operations and environmental cleanup of the Department of Energy Hanford nuclear complex. Prior to joining Westinghouse, Mr. Estes completed 30 years in the Navy Civil Engineer Corps, achieving the rank of rear admiral. He is a registered professional engineer in Illinois, served on the executive committee of the Construction Industry Institute, and is former national director of the Society of American Military Engineers. He holds a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Maine and an M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois.

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--> Harry D. Harmon has over 25 years experience with Dupont and Westinghouse at Department of Energy's Savannah River and Hanford sites in waste management and radiochemical processing activities. For the past seven years, he has focused almost entirely on high level waste operations and related technology development. His expertise includes nuclear fuel reprocessing and recovery and purification of uranium, plutonium, and transplutonium products. He also has significant experience at Savannah River Laboratory managing process technology development as well as analytical development and environmental technology. He holds a B.S. in chemistry from Carson-Newman College and a Ph.D. degree in inorganic and nuclear chemistry from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Valerie L. Putman is a senior engineer of criticality safety for Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company. Her experience and interests lie in nuclear criticality safety and in accident and incident investigation. Ms. Putman is an active member of the American Nuclear Society and its Nuclear Criticality Safety, Human Factors and Environment Divisions and Professional Development Coordinating Committee. She is also active in several American Nuclear Society ANS-8 standards writing groups on criticality safety. Ms. Putman received a B.S. in both applied physics and mathematics from the University of Utah and an M.E. in mechanical engineering with nuclear emphasis from the University of Idaho. She is pursuing her Ph.D. in nuclear engineering through a joint program with Idaho State University and the University of Idaho. A. David Rossin is Center Affiliated Scholar at the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, and is writing a book about the origin of U.S. nonproliferation policies. He is President of Rossin and Associates and consultant to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory on nuclear and energy technologies, nonproliferation and waste management. Dr. Rossin previously served as Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, and as president of the American Nuclear Society. He received a B.S. degree in engineering physics from Cornell University; an M.S. degree in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts

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--> Institute of Technology; an MBA from Northwestern University; and a Ph.D. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. Paul G. Shewmon retired recently as Professor at the Ohio State University and as a member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. His expertise is in materials sciences, especially the structure and composition of metals and alloys. Dr. Shewmon previously served as director of the Materials Science Division of the U.S. National Science Foundation and the director of the Metallurgy and Materials Division of Argonne National Lab. He received a B.S. degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Illinois, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in metallurgical engineering, from the Carnegie Institute of Technology. Dr. Shewmon is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Richard I. Smith retired from Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories in 1996 after nearly 40 years of scientific activities on the Hanford Site. During that time he conducted experiments on and performed analyses of reactor neutronics for plutonium-uranium fueled reactors, and from 1978 until his retirement led a multi-year program of studies that estimated the costs, radiation doses, and waste volumes associated with the decontamination and decommissioning of licensed commercial nuclear facilities, in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He also led studies to select concepts for DOE's MRS program and participated in the initial conceptual design of the MRS facility. He has participated in the development of a number of technical documents for and has acted as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of spent fuel management and reactor decommissioning. He received a B.S. in Physics from Washington State University and a M.S. in Applied Physics from University of California at Los Angeles, and is a licensed professional engineer in nuclear engineering in the states of California and Washington.