Biographical Data

BRADEN R.ALLENBY (cochair) is vice president for environment, health, and safety at AT&T and an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Allenby, a member of the Virginia Bar Association, has represented the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission and has been a strategic consultant on economic issues and technical telecommunications. In 1992, he was the J.Herbert Hollomon Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He was appointed vice president for technology and environment at AT&T’s Engineering Research Center in 1994 and subsequently spent two years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as director for energy and environmental systems. Renowned for his pioneering work on industrial ecology, Dr. Allenby is the author of several textbooks on the subject. He has led seminars and workshops and has taught many courses at Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the University of Wisconsin Engineering Extension School, and Columbia University. He has also lectured at many other colleges and universities, including Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Rutgers, the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford, and Tufts. Dr. Allenby is a fellow of the Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures & Commerce. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972, earned a J.D. in 1978 and an M.A. in economics in 1979 from the University of Virginia, and earned an M.A. in 1989 and a Ph.D. in 1992, both in environmental sciences, from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

W.DALE COMPTON (cochair), Lillian M.Gilbreth Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering at Purdue University, is a member of the National Academy



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Information Systems and the Environment Biographical Data BRADEN R.ALLENBY (cochair) is vice president for environment, health, and safety at AT&T and an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Allenby, a member of the Virginia Bar Association, has represented the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Communications Commission and has been a strategic consultant on economic issues and technical telecommunications. In 1992, he was the J.Herbert Hollomon Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He was appointed vice president for technology and environment at AT&T’s Engineering Research Center in 1994 and subsequently spent two years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as director for energy and environmental systems. Renowned for his pioneering work on industrial ecology, Dr. Allenby is the author of several textbooks on the subject. He has led seminars and workshops and has taught many courses at Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the University of Wisconsin Engineering Extension School, and Columbia University. He has also lectured at many other colleges and universities, including Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Rutgers, the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford, and Tufts. Dr. Allenby is a fellow of the Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures & Commerce. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972, earned a J.D. in 1978 and an M.A. in economics in 1979 from the University of Virginia, and earned an M.A. in 1989 and a Ph.D. in 1992, both in environmental sciences, from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. W.DALE COMPTON (cochair), Lillian M.Gilbreth Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering at Purdue University, is a member of the National Academy

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Information Systems and the Environment of Engineering (NAE) and was the first senior fellow of the NAE. After a stint as a professor of physics and director of the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Dr. Compton joined the Ford Motor Company, where he was vice president of research. He holds a B.A. from Wabash College, an M.S. from the University of Oklahoma, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, all in physics. JOHN CARBERRY, director of environmental technology at the DuPont Company, holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University and an M.B.A. from the University of Delaware. Since joining DuPont in 1965, he has been involved in the development of many chemical processes and new products. In his present assignment, he analyzes environmental issues and recommends technology-based programs and heads a team of scientists working on affordable, publicly acceptable remediation, treatment, and abatement technologies. Mr. Carberry is chair of the National Research Council Panel on Technology for the Disposal of Non-Stockpile Chemical Weapons Materiel, chair of the Chemical Engineering Advisory Board at Cornell University, a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and a registered professional engineer. NAZLI CHOUCRI is professor of political science and associate director of the Technology and Development Program at MIT, head of the Middle East Program at MIT, and general editor of the International Political Science Review. Since joining the faculty of MIT in 1969, her research has focused on sources of conflict in socioeconomic development at the national, regional, and global levels. She is the author of several books, including Population Dynamics and International Violence (Lexington Books, 1974) and a companion volume, Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Population and Conflict (Syracuse University Press, 1984), that focus on the relationship between population variables and conflict behavior. Dr. Choucri was involved in the preparatory work for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1992 and participated in the follow-up process leading to the 1997 U.N. General Assembly Special Session, Earth Summit +5. She directed a study on environmental challenges to global accord, the basis for an MIT Press series of which she is the editor and the author of the first volume, Global Accords: Environmental Challenges and International Responses (MIT Press, 1995). Dr. Choucri is currently senior advisor to the heads of two international institutions and has been a consultant to the governments of Abu Dhabi, Algeria, Canada, Colombia, Egypt, France, Greece, Honduras, Kuwait, Mexico, Norway, Pakistan, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen. Her current research includes the development and application of advanced information technologies to problems of socioeconomic change and sustainable development. JULIE E.COHEN, an associate professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center, teaches and writes about intellectual property law, with a particular

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Information Systems and the Environment focus on computer software and digital works and the intersection of copyright, privacy, and the First Amendment in cyberspace. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the Panel of Academic Advisors to the American Committee for Interoperable Systems, and the Committee of Concerned Intellectual Property Educators, a member organization of the Digital Future Coalition. From 1995 to 1999, Dr. Cohen was assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and from 1992 to 1995 she was an associate with the San Francisco firm of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen, where she specialized in intellectual property litigation. She received her A.B. from Harvard-Radcliffe and her J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she was a supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review. She is a former law clerk to the Honorable Stephen Reinhardt of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. PATRICK D.EAGAN, a program director with the Engineering Professional Development Department of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has more than 18 years of experience in industry as a design engineer, plant/project manager, business development manager, educator, and researcher. His research interests are focused on design for the environment, environmental supply chain management, and environmentally conscious manufacturing. In addition to developing design tools and courses on industrial environmental design principles and approaches for designers and engineers, he has promoted the accessibility of industrial environmental educational materials to technical professionals here and abroad. Dr. Eagan has lectured and been a consultant on environmental engineering design and “green management” for many companies and institutions, including Johnson & Johnson, Boeing, Eastman Kodak, AMP, the Minnesota Environmental Initiative, Patagonia, and Motorola. He has also served on many panels and committees for the Office of Technology Assessment, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Great Lakes/Mid-Atlantic Hazardous Substances Research Center. On the international level, he has been a consultant for Initiativa, GEMI, Austrian Department of Commerce, Korean Foreign Trade Association, Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and the Pohang University of Science and Technology. Dr. Eagan earned a B.A. in biology from Lawrence University, an M.S. in water resources management from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in land resources from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. JERRY FOWLER, a senior scientist at Telcordia Technologies Applied Research, was a member of the technical staff of the InfoSleuth Project at Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC), where he was responsible for the application of InfoSleuth agent technology for NIST’s Healthcare Information Infrastructure Technology/Healthcare Enterprise Information

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Information Systems and the Environment Management Project. Prior to joining MCC, Dr. Fowler was on the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine, where he was involved in research on information management and retrieval and participated in the development of the Virtual Notebook System and the MEDLINE Retriever. He has worked on distributed clinical systems, an immunization registry, and a community health information system and is the author of numerous publications on medical informatics and computer science. He has a B.S. in mathematics and a B.S. in music (string bass) from the University of Oklahoma and an M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from Rice University. THOMAS E.GRAEDEL is professor of industrial ecology in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, a position he assumed after 27 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He was the first atmospheric chemist to study the atmospheric reactions of sulfur and the concentration trends for methane and carbon monoxide. As a corrosion scientist, he devised the first computer model to simulate the atmospheric corrosion of metals and was a volunteer consultant to the Statue of Liberty Restoration Project in 1984–1986. One of the founders of the newly emerging field of industrial ecology, he coauthored the first textbook in the field, Industrial Ecology (Prentice-Hall, 1995). Mr. Graedel has published nine other books and more than 200 scientific papers. JOSEPH A.HEIM, a materials engineer, is the head of long-range technology planning at Genie Industries, Redmond, Washington. From 1993 to 1998, he was on the industrial engineering faculty at the University of Washington in Seattle. Before joining the University of Washington, he was senior program officer in the Manufacturing Studies Board of the National Research Council; and from 1990 to 1992, he was the first J.Herbert Hollomon Fellow of the National Academy of Engineering. For several years, Heim was an executive and co-founder of two software product development firms. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in computer science from the University of Louisville and an M.S. and Ph.D. in industrial engineering from Purdue University. JAMES W.HEPTINSTALL was team leader for the redesign of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) processes at Rhône-Poulenc, Inc., at the time of the workshop. His previous corporate-level assignments include a member of the HSE Business Process Redesign Team and team leader, North American Manufacturing Strategy Team (which defined Rhône-Poulenc’s long-range manufacturing strategy). He also held management positions at manufacturing facilities of Rhône-Poulenc, Griffin Corporation, and Stauffer Chemical Company. Mr. Heptinstall graduated from Auburn University with a B.S. in chemical engineering. KOSUKE ISHII earned his B.S.M.E. in 1979 from Sophia University, Tokyo, an M.S.M.E. from Stanford University, and an M.C.E. from the Tokyo Institute of

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Information Systems and the Environment Technology. After three years as a design engineer at Toshiba Corporation, he returned to Stanford and completed his Ph.D. in mechanical design. He was on the faculty at Ohio State University (OSU) from 1988 to 1994 and is currently an associate professor at Stanford University, where he is codirector of the Manufacturing Modeling Laboratory. His research is focused on life-cycle engineering and robust design. He directs the graduate course sequence on designing for manufacturability on the Stanford Instructional Television Network. Dr. Ishii is the author or coauthor of more than 80 refereed articles, was chair of the ASME Computers in Engineering Division in 1998, and was an associate editor of the Journal of Mechanical Design and AI in Engineering. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Lilly Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching (1989), the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award (1991), OSU Lumely Research Award (1992), Pitney Bowes-ASME Award for Excellence in Mechanical Design (1993), OSU Harrison Faculty Award (1994), AT&T Industrial Ecology Faculty Fellowship (1995), General Motors Outstanding Long Distance Learning Faculty Award (1996), and the LG Electronics Advisory Professorship (1997). MICHAEL R.KABJIAN has been a consultant to a wide range of clients around the world on environmental and chemical management information systems. Prior to striking out on his own, he was a project manager for EMAX Solution Partners, where he was responsible for deploying information management systems for environmental compliance in various manufacturing facilities. He has also designed and developed information systems for Roy F.Weston, Inc., to support corporate initiatives in designing for the environment, life-cycle analysis, and risk assessment. Mr. Kabjian holds a B.S. in environmental systems engineering and a B.S. in strategic management from the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. PAUL C.KILLGOAR, Jr., has been manager of vehicle crash safety research, Product Development Center, Ford Motor Company, since 2000. His areas of responsibility include advanced work on vehicle safety systems and the verification of safety performance of new vehicles. He received his B.S. in chemistry from Bridgewater State College and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Michigan State University in 1972, when he joined the Polymer Science Department of Ford Research. In 1991, he became manager of research programs on fuels and lubricants for power-train applications. The major foci of this research were the liquid-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons, tribology, and the volatility behavior of fuels. From 1992 to 1995, Dr. Killgoar was manager of the chemistry research department, where he directed major projects on the gas-phase photochemistry of air pollutants, the modeling of atmospheric pollution processes, the real-time measurement of emissions from vehicles, and the control of manufacturing emissions, including bioremediation. From 1995–2000 he was manager of the Manufacturing Systems Department of Ford Research. The research activities of the

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Information Systems and the Environment department cover most manufacturing disciplines, such as painting, machining, joining, rapid prototyping and tooling, plastics processing, and sheet-metal forming. He has been granted eight patents and has published 24 papers on coating, adhesives, elastomers, polymer processing, and related topics. PAUL R.KLEINDORFER is the Universal Furniture Professor of Decision Sciences and Economics and professor of public policy and management at the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. He is codirector of the Wharton Center of Risk Management and Decision Processes, where he conducts research on regulated industries, focused on energy and environmental problems. Dr. Kleindorfer also recently initiated the Infrastructure Forum, in cooperation with the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Business, Law, and Technology, in Herzliya, Israel, to promote research and education on infrastructure development and commercialization in the Mediterranean region. He has held university appointments at Carnegie Mellon University (1986–1989), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1969–1972), Wharton School of Business (1973–present), and several international research institutes, including IIASA (Vienna) and the Science Center (Berlin). He is the author or coauthor of 10 books and more than 100 research papers on managerial economics, productivity, and regulation. He has been a consultant to the U.S. Postal Service and many regulated companies in the telecommunications and energy sectors. Dr. Kleindorfer graduated with distinction with a B.Sc. from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1961. He studied on a Fulbright Fellowship in mathematics at the University of Tubingen, Germany (1964–1965) and pursued doctoral studies at Carnegie Mellon University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1970 in systems and communications sciences. JOSHUA KNAUER is one of the leading (and youngest) pioneers of progressive on-line activism. As a student at Carnegie Mellon University in 1991, Mr. Knauer started the EnviroLink Network, now the Internet’s largest environmental information resource for activists, organizations, businesses, and government. Mr. Knauer created GreenMarketplace.com in 1999, an e-commerce site for socially and environmentally responsible products, services, and information. GreenMarketplace.com and EnviroLink have generated a great deal of media attention, including a prominent write-up in a Time Magazine special issue, “Heroes for the Planet.” Mr. Knauer has also appeared as a commentator on socially and environmentally responsible business practices for the Fox News Channel. He was recently named one of AlterNet’s “New Media Heroes,” and his writings have appeared in numerous books and journals. Mr. Knauer is a member of the boards of directors of several organizations, including Sea Shepherd Conservation International, Institute for Global Communications, Allegheny Sierra Club, and EnviroLink. He frequently makes presentations at conferences and speaks to high school and college students about balancing social, environmental, and economic values. Mr. Knauer received a B.S. in environmental ethics and policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Information Systems and the Environment DAVID S.LIEBL is an associate faculty member of the Department of Engineering Professional Development Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a waste reduction and management specialist with the Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center at the University of Wisconsin-Extension. In 1996, he chaired the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable’s Information and Technology Transfer Working Group, which led the effort to establish a national pollution prevention information network (http://www.p2.org). In collaboration with pollution prevention programs in the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada, he established the Great Lakes Technical Resource Library. He also founded the P2Tech pollution prevention listserv (http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/p2tech) and created the VENDINFO directory of pollution prevention technology manufacturers and service providers (http://es.epa.gov/vendors). WILLIAM M.MARTIN is the senior law clerk to the Honorable Joseph F. Weis, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. At the time the article was written, Martin was a student at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and a managing editor of the University of Pittsburgh Law Review. Martin will be joining the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in the fall of 2001. GREG PITTS is the executive director of Ecolibrium, a nonprofit research and education organization. At the time of this writing, Mr. Pitts was the director of environmental programs at Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation, where he was responsible for environmental technology development and for addressing the effect of environmental issues on competitiveness in the electronics and computer industries. He established a program to direct several research projects on the development of environmentally friendly methods of fabricating printed wiring boards and the disposition (e.g., reuse, remanufacture, recycling, etc.) of electronic products, designing environment tools, and promoting electronic access and use of environmental information. He managed an industry/government/academia life-cycle assessment of a computer work station and a study of environmental issues for the electronics industry. DEANNA J.RICHARDS is an independent consultant on environmental and sustainable development. From 1990 to 1999, Dr. Richards directed the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Program on Technology and Environment/ Technology and Sustainable Development. From 1996 to 1998, she served as acting director of the NAE Program Office and oversaw the management of six additional programs. During her tenure at NAE, she launched the institution’s initiatives on industrial ecology and engineering ecological concerns. Before joining the NAE, Dr. Richards was an assistant professor of environmental engineering at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research and publications were focused on advanced biological treatment systems for the treatment of hazardous waste. A registered professional engineer, she also worked for

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Information Systems and the Environment several years as an environmental engineer in the United States and Malaysia. She received a B.S. (honors) in civil engineering from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and an M.S. and Ph.D. also in civil/environmental engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. MAURICE RICKARD was the creative director of the EnviroLink Network, the new-media editor of the electronic book review, and a media consultant at the time of the workshop. He has worked with Internet and print-based electronic publishing since 1986, designing, writing, proofreading, and producing web sites, catalogs, promotional brochures, newsletters, and other publications and developing and implementing electronic publishing systems. He has been a consultant to Graphical Arts Technical Foundation, Carnegie Mellon Research Institute, Black Box Corporation, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, HealthAmerica, the University of Pittsburgh Press, the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, and other organizations. Rickard has an M.A. in English from the University of Pittsburgh. ELI M.SNIR is a lecturer in the Operations and Information Department of the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania, where he recently completed his Ph.D. As a research fellow at the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center, Dr. Snir’s research focused on evaluating the importance of information sharing in supply chains as well as the effect of liability-sharing rules on environmental policies and procedures. His recent research has been focused on the outsourcing of information technology services. Before his enrollment at Wharton, Dr. Snir was an officer in the Israeli Army for five years. He received an M.Sc. in operations research and systems analysis and a B.Sc. in industrial engineering from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. LYNDA M.WIESE was director of the Bureau of Cooperative Environmental Assistance with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), which examines nontraditional approaches to waste reduction and pollution prevention through partnerships with industry and innovative approaches to pollution control, such as ISO 14000 and whole-facility regulation. As a field engineer and supervisor for the WDNR Air Management Program, she spent 14 years working on regulatory compliance, regulatory enforcement, and permitting. Ms. Wiese was involved in policy development through the Wisconsin Clean Air Act Task Force and was chair of the WDNR Asphalt Paving Technology Transfer Team. She graduated from Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin, with a B.S. in geology and meteorology. Ms. Wiese, who died of cancer in September 2000, is sorely missed by her family, friends, and colleagues.