TABLE 6-1 Articles from NIH-Sponsored Programs Relative to Cancer Among Minority and Medically Underserved Populations by Key Terms in Title

 

No. of Articles

Key Term in Title

Year

Total

Not Multicultural

Multicultural

1997

110

50

28

1996

129

42

20

1995

119

55

13

1994

83

22

12

1993

62

27

27

1992

66

40

10

1991

63

33

2

1990

50

29

3

1989

38

15

5

1988

32

24

2

1987

33

16

2

1986

39

19

3

1985

64

31

8

Total

888

403

135

 

SOURCE: National Cancer Institute.

1. Dissemination of cancer information to ethnic minority and medically underserved groups requires more than a simple translation of materials.

Venus Gines and Lucy Young noted that when they were first diagnosed with breast cancer, they had a difficult time finding information in their native languages (Spanish and Chinese, respectively) that addressed concerns particular to their cultural groups. Gines noted that what she did find was merely translated from English. Such translations, she noted, often fail to address specific concerns that may be more common among some ethnic groups (such as the fatalism regarding a cancer diagnosis that exists among some Hispanic populations) or that fail to take into account cultural differences in the ways in which information is best communicated. In response, Gines, in collaboration with the American Cancer Society, developed Mi Nueva Esperanza (My New Hope) to provide information regarding breast cancer among Hispanic women. The booklet is written in clear, simple Spanish but also uses pictures to convey information.

2. Cancer education materials must be made available in languages other than English and Spanish.



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