African American

Hispanic

Asian/Pacific

Native American/ Alaska Native

Related to Survivorship

22

7

10

5

9

25

9

11

16

15

17

20

10

4

5

17

9

6

6

4

31

24

12

10

8

22

3

7

2

1

3

5

11

1

2

6

4

6

 

2

5

3

6

5

1

1

2

3

 

 

4

3

3

2

1

3

6

7

2

 

3

6

14

4

 

159

101

106

57

48

On the basis of information provided to the study committee, it appears that most non-English-language NCI publications for cancer survivors are in Spanish. The committee found few examples of materials printed in other languages that are increasingly spoken in multiethnic America, such as Asian and Southeast Asian languages. This observation was supported by Lucy Young, who expressed frustration at the lack of Chinese-language cancer education materials. Her organization (the Chinese American Cancer Society) has had to import Chinese-language cancer education materials or provide resources for the translation of information generated in English.

3. Members of ethnic minority and medically underserved communities, especially cancer survivors, can serve as a valuable resource in reaching other members of their communities.

Barbara Clinton noted that research on the efficacy of lay community health workers is lacking. These individuals, she stated, often have experience in dealing with cultural aspects of the disease (e.g., fear of public acknowledgment of a cancer diagnosis), but they can also help patients deal with the maze of treatment options, providers, and other medical



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement