Appendix A
Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy Members' Biographical Information

Committee Chair

Phillip A. Griffiths has been Director of the Institute for Advanced Study since 1991. He was the Provost and James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics of Duke University from 1983–1991. In 1983 he was the Dwight Parker Robinson Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University. Phillip, a member of the National Science Board, became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1979. He chaired the Board on Mathematical Sciences from 1986–91, and Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications in 1992. He was the recipient of the LeRoy Steele Prize given by the American Mathematical Society, and Dannie Heineman Prize of the Academy of Sciences at Gottingen.

Bruce M. Alberts, President of the National Academy of Sciences, is a respected biochemist recognized for his work in both biochemistry and molecular biology. He is noted particularly for his extensive study of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be replicated, as required for a living cell to divide. Bruce is a past Chair of the Commission on Life Sciences. He has served on the faculties of Princeton University, and as Vice Chair and Chair of the UCSF Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Being committed to the improvement of science education, he has dedicated much of his time to education projects in San Francisco elementary schools.

Peter Diamond is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1966. He



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--> Appendix A Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy Members' Biographical Information Committee Chair Phillip A. Griffiths has been Director of the Institute for Advanced Study since 1991. He was the Provost and James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics of Duke University from 1983–1991. In 1983 he was the Dwight Parker Robinson Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University. Phillip, a member of the National Science Board, became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1979. He chaired the Board on Mathematical Sciences from 1986–91, and Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications in 1992. He was the recipient of the LeRoy Steele Prize given by the American Mathematical Society, and Dannie Heineman Prize of the Academy of Sciences at Gottingen. Bruce M. Alberts, President of the National Academy of Sciences, is a respected biochemist recognized for his work in both biochemistry and molecular biology. He is noted particularly for his extensive study of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be replicated, as required for a living cell to divide. Bruce is a past Chair of the Commission on Life Sciences. He has served on the faculties of Princeton University, and as Vice Chair and Chair of the UCSF Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Being committed to the improvement of science education, he has dedicated much of his time to education projects in San Francisco elementary schools. Peter Diamond is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1966. He

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--> received his B.A. in Mathematics from Yale University in 1960 and his Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1963. He is Chair of the Board of the National Academy of Social Insurance, where he has been President. He has been President of the Econometric Society and Vice-President of the American Economic Association. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a Founding Member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. He was the recipient of the 1980 Mahalanobis Memorial Award and the 1994 Nemmers Prize. He has written on public finance, social insurance, uncertainty and search theories, and the macroeconomics. Gerald P. Dinneen was Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Engineering from 1988 until 1995. He was previously Vice President of Science and Technology at Honeywell Corporation and from 1977–81 he was the Assistant Secretary of Defense and Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering. He has had a long affiliation with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1953 when he joined the MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. He advanced through many positions to become the Director, 1970–77, and concurrently, a Professor of Electrical Engineering, 1971–81. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1975 and serves on many advisory committees and boards for the National Research Council and in government. He has been elected to the Engineering Academy of Japan, the Swiss Academy of Technological Sciences, and the Royal Academy of Engineering of the U.K. Mildred S. Dresselhaus is currently the Institute Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she held the Abby Rockefeller Mauze Chair at MIT in Electrical Engineering and in Physics, and directed the Center for Materials Science and Engineering. She has been active in the study of a wide range of problems in the physics of solids, and the modification of the properties of electronic materials by

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--> intercalation and implantation, the structure and properties of carbon fibers, of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, and of high T-c superconductors. She was awarded the National Medal of Science in November 1990, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1974, and to the National Academy of Sciences in 1985. She has been a member of both Councils of NAE and NAS, the Governing Board, and has served on numerous committees including Chair of the Committee on Women in Science and Engineering, and has served as NAS Treasurer since 1992. James J. Duderstadt is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his B.A. from Yale University in 1964 and his doctorate in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1967. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968 and has served as Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Dean of the College of Engineering, and then as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. He was elected President of the University of Michigan in 1988 and served in that role until July 1996. He received the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation, the E.O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, and the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching. He has served as chair of the National Science Board, chair of the Board of Directors of the Big Ten Athletic Conference and chair of the Executive Board of the University of Michigan's Hospitals. He also serves as a director of the Unisys Corporation and CMS Energy Corporation. He has been a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 1987. Marye Anne Fox, a chemist and member of the National Academy of Sciences, is North Carolina State University's 12th chancellor. Appointed on April 9, 1998, Marye Anne assumed the duties of the top post at the state's flagship science and technology university on August 1, 1998. Before this appointment, Marye

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--> Anne was the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry and Vice President for Research at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include physical organic chemistry; organic photochemistry; organic electrochemistry; chemical reactivity in non-homogeneous systems; heterogeneous photocatalysis; and electronic transfer in anisotropic macromolecular arrays. Marye Anne currently serves on the Council of the NAS, its Executive Committee, and the Committee on Science and Education Policy. After U.S. Senate confirmation in 1990 of her nomination to the National Science Board, she served as its Vice Chairman (1994–96) and chaired its Committee on Programs and Plans (1991–94). She serves on the Texas Governor's Science and Technology Council, has chaired the Chemistry Section of AAAS, and advises its Center for Science, Technology and the Congress. She has served on advisory panels for the Army, the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. She has served on 14 editorial boards, including a stint as associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. She serves on boards of the Texas Environmental Defense Fund, Texas Agribusiness Council, Texas Food and Fiber Commission, W.R. Grace, and Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Ralph E. Gomory has been President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation since 1989. Following his university position as Higgins Lecturer and Assistant Professor at Princeton, he joined IBM in 1959, becoming Vice President in 1973, and Senior Vice President for Science and Technology from 1985–1989. A member of both the NAS and NAE, he has received the Lanchester Prize in 1963, the John yon Neumann Theory Prize in 1984, the IEEE Engineering Leadership Recognition Award in 1988, and National Medal of Science in 1988. In 1990, he was named to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Ruby P. Hearn is senior vice president of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the largest health care philanthropy in the

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--> United States. The Foundation has awarded over two billion dollars in grant funds since its inception as a national philanthropy in 1972. As a member of the executive management team, Ruby participates in strategic program planning with the president and executive vice president and serves as a special advisor to the president and as the Foundation's liaison within the non-profit community. Dr. Hearn has had the major responsibility for oversight and program development of initiatives in maternal, infant and child health, AIDS, substance abuse and minority medical education. She received her MS and PhD degrees in biophysics from Yale University and is a graduate of Skidmore College. She is a Fellow, Yale Corporation. She served on the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors for the 1995 Special Olympics World Summer games in Connecticut, among others. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and its governing Council, the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), the Board of Directors of the Council on Foundations and the Science Board for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and is also serving on the Advisory Committee to the Director, National Institutes of Health. Philip W. Majerus has been Co-Director of the Division of Hematology-Oncology at the Washington University School of Medicine since 1973. He holds concurrent positions as Professor of Biochemistry and Professor of Medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine, as Chairman of the James S. McDonnell Foundation's Program for Molecular Medicine in Cancer Research, as Chairman of NAS Section 41, Medical Genetics, Hematology and Oncology, and as Chairman of the Board of Scientific Advisors NHLBI. He was Chairman of the Searle Scholars Program (1989–1993), President of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1981–1982) and of the American Society of Hematology (1991). Philip is an NAS and IOM member and is a Fellow with the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Arts and

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--> Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is on the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. June E. Osborn is the sixth president of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation in New York. She received a B.A. from Oberlin College in 1957 and an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 1961. She spent three years in training as a pediatric resident at Boston Children's and Massachusetts General Hospitals and then two years as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins Medical School and at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1966 to 1984 she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin Medical School where she was Professor in the Departments of Medical Microbiology and of Pediatrics. In 1975 she also became Associate Dean for Biological Sciences in the University of Wisconsin Graduate School. Kenneth I. Shine is President of the Institute of Medicine, and Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. He is UCLA School of Medicine's immediate past Dean and Provost for Medical Services. He was Director of the Coronary Care Unit, Chief of the Cardiology Division, and Chair of the Department of Medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine. He has served as Chairman of the Council of Deans of the AAMC, and was President of the American Heart Association. His research interests include metabolic events in the heart muscle, the relation of behavior to heart disease, and emergency medicine. Morris Tonenbaum was the Vice Chairman of the Board and Chief Financial Officer of AT&T from 1988–1991. He began his career at Bell Telephone Labs on the technical staff, held various positions at Western Electric Company including Vice President of the Engineering Division and Vice President of Manufacturing, before returning to Bell Labs in 1975 as Executive Vice President.

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--> In 1978 he became President of New Jersey Bell Telephone Company, returned to AT&T as Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Planning in 1980, becoming the first Chairman and CEO of AT&T Communications in 1984. Morry was Vice President of NAE until June 1998. William Julius Wilson is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He was formerly Lucy Flower University Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and former member of the President's Committee on the National Medal of Science, and past President of both the American Sociological Association and the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA). William A. Wulf is President of NAE. The former NAE Councillor, he was AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia. He has served as Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation, Chairman and CEO of Tartan Laboratories, Inc., and as Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He has been a member of NAE since 1993, and serves as Chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Staff Richard Bissell is Executive Director of the Policy Division and Director of COSEPUP. He took up his current position in June 1998. Most recently, he served as Coordinator of the Interim Secretariat of the World Commission on Dams (1997–1998) and as a Member and Chairman of the Inspection Panel at the World Bank (1994–1997). He worked closely with the Academy during his tenure in senior positions at the U.S. Agency for International Development (1986–1993) as head of the Bureau of Science and

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--> Technology, and as head of the Bureau of Program and Policy Coordination. He has been published widely in the field of political economy, and has taught at Georgetown University as well as the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.A. from Stanford University (1968) and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Tufts University (1970, 1973). Deborah Stine is Associate Director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). She has worked on various projects throughout the National Academy of Sciences complex since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP on policy implications of greenhouse warming, and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. Other studies have addressed graduate education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, environmental remediation, the national biological survey, and corporate environmental stewardship. She holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master's degree in business administration; and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the academy, she was a mathematician for the U.S. Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Anne-Marie Mazza is a Senior Program Officer with Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy and the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. She staffs COSEPUP on the Research and the Government Performance and Results Act project. She also is responsible for staffing two GUIRR Working Groups: Working Group III, Public Understanding of Science and Technology, chaired by Dr. Ken Shine, and Working Group IV, Human Resources, chaired by Dr. Bruce Alberts. In addition, she serves on the Executive Committee of the Federal

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--> Demonstration Partnership, which GUIRR convenes. She holds a B.A. in Economics, a M.A. in History and Public Policy, and a Ph.D. in Public Policy from The George Washington University. Before coming to the Academy, she was a Senior Consultant at Resource Planning Corporation responsible for a variety of projects involving large-scale litigation, including asbestos, dalkon shield IUD, Times Beach, Love Canal, unintended acceleration in the Audi 5000, and environmental reinsurance. Brett Willette is the Research Associate for the COSEPUP and Office of Special Projects. He holds a B.S. in Business Management from the University of Maryland and is nearing completion of his M.S. in Healthcare Administration and Policy. Prior to assuming this current position, he served with the U.S. Air Force working on Ballistic Missile Defense Organization weapons systems at the Pentagon from 1995 to 1998 and was Training Development Coordinator for the International Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training School from 1987 to 1995. Carolyn Ryan holds a bachelors degree in physics from the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. Just before entering college she lived in Italy for a year as an exchange student. She recently joined the academy as a research associate for COSEPUP and the Office of Special Projects. Previously, she worked with the House of Representatives Committee on Science assisting the Chief Counsel on all issues under the Committee's jurisdiction.

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