Ellen Meltzer, University of California, Berkeley

David G. Messerschmitt, University of California, Berkeley

Jeanine Meyer, Pace University

Paul Nielson, Manitoba Library Association

Jim Perry, Kinko's Inc.

Viera K. Proulx, Northeastern University

Richard S. Rosenberg, University of British Columbia

Linda Loos Scarth, Mount Mercy College

Greg W. Scragg, State University of New York at Geneseo

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University

Ralph D. Westfall, University of Southern California

Marsha Cook Woodbury, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

D.2 Questions About Information Technology Literacy Posted on the Internet

D.2.1 Questions for Computer and Communications Scientists and Engineers

1. For purposes of this discussion, the committee provisionally distinguishes in a loose and informal way between fundamental concepts, applications of fundamental concepts, and engineering and design principles used in applying concepts. To illustrate, a concept might be "instruction interpretation." An application of that concept might be "Java byte-code interpretation." An engineering principle might be "design under constraint" (e.g., designing a Java interpreter under the constraint of limited memory or bandwidth).

1a. What are the fundamental concepts of information technology that an educated adult should know? (Interpret information technology broadly to include computing and communications.) For each concept:

  • Describe it;
  • Identify the age or educational level at which you believe it should first be introduced; and
  • Explain how it might be introduced.

1b. What are the essential applications of the fundamental concepts?

  • Describe it;
  • Identify the age or educational level at which you believe it should first be introduced; and
  • Explain how it might be introduced.


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