Appendixes



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--> Appendixes

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--> Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Trevor O. Jones, chair, is chair and chief executive officer (CEO) of Biomec, Incorporated, a biomedical device company. He was formerly vice chairman of the board of Echlin, Incorporated, a supplier of automotive components primarily to the after-market. He is also chairman and CEO of International Development Corporation, a private management consulting company that advises automotive supplier companies on strategy and technology. He was chair, president, and CEO (retired) of Libbey-Owens-Ford Company, a major manufacturer of glass for automotive and construction applications. Previously, he was an officer of TRW, Incorporated, serving in various capacities in the company's Automotive Worldwide Sector, including vice president of engineering and group vice president, Transportation Electronics Group. Prior to joining TRW, he was employed by General Motors in many aerospace and automotive executive positions, including director of General Motors Proving Grounds; director of the Delco Electronics Division, Automotive Electronic and Safety Systems; and director of General Motors' Advanced Product Engineering Group. Mr. Jones is a life fellow of the American Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and has been cited for "leadership in the application of electronics to the automobile." He is also a fellow of the American Society of Automotive Engineers, a fellow of the British Institution of Electrical Engineers, a fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit, a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin, and a chartered engineer in the United Kingdom. He holds many patents and has lectured and written on the subjects of automotive safety and electronics. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a former commissioner of the National Research Council (NRC) Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems.

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--> Mr. Jones has served on several other NRC study committees, including the Committee for a Strategic Transportation Research Study on Highway Safety, and chaired the NAE Steering Committee on the Impact of Products Liability Law on Innovation. He holds an HNC (Higher National Certificate) in electrical engineering from Aston Technical College and an ONC (Ordinary National Certificate) in mechanical engineering from Liverpool Technical College. Alexis T. Bell (NAE) is professor of chemical engineering and dean of the College of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley. The focus of his research is on heterogeneous catalysis and the relationship between catalyst composition and structure and catalyst performance on the molecular level. He is a recipient of the Curtis W. McGraw Award for Research, American Association of Engineering Education; the Professional Progress Award, American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the Paul H. Emmett Award in Fundamental Catalysis, the Catalysis Society; and the R.H. Wilhelm Award in Chemical Reaction Engineering, American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He received his Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Harry E. Cook (NAE) received his Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. He is a recipient of the Robert Lansing Hardy Medal and the Ralph R. Teetor Award, as well as awards from the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. He is also a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the American Society of Metals. His career in the automotive industry began with the Ford Motor Company as a senior research engineer and culminated as the director of automotive research with Chrysler Motors. Currently, Dr. Cook is head, Department of General Engineering at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. His research includes work on phase transformations, friction and wear, automotive product development, and competitiveness. David E. Foster is professor of mechanical engineering and director, Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Engine Research Center has won two center of excellence competitions for engine research and has extensive facilities for research on internal combustion engines, mainly diesels. Dr. Foster's interests include thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, internal combustion engines, combustion kinetics, and emissions formation. He is a recipient of the Ralph R. Teetor Award and the Forest R. McFarland Award of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Professor Foster is active on a number of committees of the Society of Automotive Engineers. He has conducted research in many areas related to internal combustion engines. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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--> Norman A. Gjostein (NAE) is currently clinical professor of engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, where he teaches courses in materials engineering. He retired from Ford Research Laboratory as director, Manufacturing and Materials Research Laboratory, which includes research in advanced materials, manufacturing systems, and computer-aided engineering. He has directed a variety of advanced research programs, including the development of lightweight metals, composite materials, sodium-sulfur batteries, fiber-optic multiplex systems, and smart sensors. He has pioneered studies in surface science and discovered a number of new surface structures still under investigation today. He is a member of the NAE and a fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD) and the American Society of Metals (ASM). He has received ASM's Shoemaker Award and ESD's Gold Award. He has a B.S. and M.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. David F. Hagen spent 35 years with Ford Motor Company, where his position prior to retirement was general manager, alpha simultaneous engineer, Ford Technical Affairs. Under his leadership, Ford's alpha activity, which involves the identification, assessment, and implementation of new product and process technologies, evolved into the company's global resource for leading-edge automotive product, process, and analytic technologies. Mr. Hagen led the introduction of the first domestic industry feedback electronics, central fuel metering, full electronic engine controls, and numerous four-cylinder, V6, and V8 engines. Based on his work on Ford's modern engine families, he was awarded the Society of Automotive Engineers E.N. Cole Award for Automotive Engineering Innovation in 1998. Mr. Hagen received his B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan. He is a fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit and a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers. He is currently serving on the Visionary Manufacturing Committee of the National Research Council, the board of the School of Management, University of Michigan-Dearborn, and the engineering advisory boards of both Western Michigan University and the University of Michigan-Dearborn. John B. Heywood is Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and director of the Sloan Automotive Laboratory. Dr. Heywood's research interests have focused on understanding and explaining the processes that govern the operation and design of internal combustion engines and their fuel requirements. His major research activities include engine combustion, pollutant formation, and operating and emissions characteristics and fuel requirements of automotive and aircraft engines. He has been a consultant to Ford Motor Company, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, and several other industrial and government organizations. He has received the U.S. Department of Transportation 1996 Award for the Advancement of Motor Vehicle

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--> Research and Development, as well as several awards from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), among others. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an Sc.D. from Cambridge University. He is a fellow of SAE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Fritz Kalhammer is consultant for the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Strategic Science and Technology Group. He was co-chair of the California Air Resources Board's Battery Technical Advisory Panel on electric vehicle batteries. More recently, he chaired a similar panel to assess the prospects of fuel cells for electric vehicle propulsion. He has been vice president of EPRI's Strategic Research and Development and established the institute's programs for energy storage, fuel cells, electric vehicles, and energy conservation. Before joining EPRI, he directed electrochemical energy conversion, storage, and process research and development at Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International), conducted research in solid-state physics at Philco Corporation, and conducted research in catalysis at Hoechst, in Germany. He has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Munich. John G. Kassakian is professor of electrical engineering and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems. His expertise is in the use of electronics for the control and conversion of electrical energy, industrial and utility applications of power electronics, electronic manufacturing technologies, and automotive electrical and electronic systems. Prior to joining the MIT faculty, he served in the U.S. Navy. He is on the board of directors of a number of companies and has held numerous positions with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), including founding president of the IEEE Power Electronics Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the IEEE, and has received the IEEE's William E. Newell Award for Outstanding Achievements in Power Electronics (1987), the IEEE Centennial Medal (1984), and the IEEE Power Electronics Society's Distinguished Service Award (1998). He has an Sc.D. in electrical engineering from MIT. Harold Hing Chuen Kung is professor of chemical engineering at Northwestern University and was director of the Center for Catalysis and Surface Science. His research includes surface chemistry, catalysis, and chemical reaction engineering. His professional experience includes work as a research chemist at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. He is a recipient of the P.H. Emmett Award from the North American Catalysis Society, the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowship, John McClanahan Henske Distinguished Lectureship of Yale University, and Olaf A. Hougen Professorship of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University.

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--> Craig Marks is president of Creative Management Solutions. He is also adjunct professor in both the College of Engineering and the School of Business Administration at the University of Michigan and co-director of the Joel D. Tauber Manufacturing Institute. Dr. Marks is also president of the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan. He is a retired vice president of technology and productivity for AlliedSignal Automotive, where he was responsible for product development; manufacturing; quality; health, safety, and environment; communications; and business planning. Previously, in TRW's Automotive Worldwide Sector, Dr. Marks was vice president for engineering and technology and later vice president of technology at TRW Safety Restraint Systems. Prior to joining TRW, he held various positions at General Motors Corporation, including executive director of the engineering staff; assistant director of advanced product engineering; engineer in charge of power development; electric-vehicle program manager; supervisor for long-range engine development; and executive director of the environmental activities staff. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Dr. Marks received his B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. John Scott Newman is professor of chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. His research experience is in the design and analysis of electrochemical systems, transport properties of concentrated electrolytic solutions, and various fuel cells and batteries. He has received the Young Author's Prize from the Electrochemical Society, the David C. Grahame Award, the Henry B. Linford Award, the Olin Palladium Medal, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is author of Electrochemical Systems, which has been translated into Japanese and Russian. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Jerome G. Rivard is president of Global Technology and Business Development, which advises business and universities on global business approaches to automotive electronics. He previously held a number of senior management positions with the Bendix Corporation and Ford Motor Company, including vice president for the Allied Automotive Sector of Bendix Electronics Group; group director of engineering for Bendix Electronic Fuel Injection Division; manager of the Bendix Automotive Advanced Concepts Program; and chief engineer for the Electrical and Electronics Division of Ford. Mr. Rivard built an engineering group with skills in electronics, electromechanical devices, fluid-flow control, combustion and power production, and control systems integration. He applied a systems approach to technical discipline management and adopted financial management systems to plan and control engineering projects effectively for maximum return on investment. Mr. Rivard is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

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--> and the Society of Automotive Engineers. He received his B.S.M.E. from the University of Wisconsin. Vernon P. Roan is director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Engineering and professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been a faculty member for more than 30 years. He is also the director of the University of Florida Fuel Cell Research and Training Laboratory (since 1994). He was previously a senior design engineer with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. Dr. Roan has more than 25 years of research and development experience. He is currently developing improved modeling and simulation systems for a fuel-cell bus program and works as a consultant to Pratt and Whitney on advanced gas-turbine propulsion systems. His research at the University of Florida has involved both spark-ignition and diesel engines operating with many alternative fuels and advanced concepts. With groups of engineering students, he designed and built a 20-passenger diesel-electric bus for the Florida Department of Transportation and a hybrid-electric urban car using an internal-combustion engine and lead-acid batteries. He has been a consultant to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, monitoring electric and hybrid vehicle programs. He has organized and chaired two national meetings on advanced vehicle technologies and a national seminar on the development of fuel-cell-powered automobiles and has published numerous technical papers on innovative propulsion systems. He was one of the four members of the Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Panel of the California Air Resources Board, which issued a report in May 1998 regarding the status and outlook for fuel cells for transportation applications. Dr. Roan received his B.S. in aeronautical engineering and his M.S. in engineering from the University of Florida and his Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Illinois.