Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

KEITH F. RUST (Chair) is a vice president and associate director of the statistical group at Westat, Inc. He is also research associate professor at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, and director of statistical operations for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He was the sampling referee for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). H. is primary areas of research are sample survey design, variance estimation, and inference ú from complex survey data. From 1992 to 1998 he was a member of the Committee on National Statistics, and he is now on the editorial board of the Journal of Official Statistics . He received a B.A. from Flinders University of South Australia and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.

RONALD F. ABLER is executive director of the Association of American Geographers and a vice president of the International Geographical Union. He serves on the boards of directors of Project Varenius, GIS/LIS, Inc., and the International Geographic Information Foundation and is treasurer of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Sciences. He is professor emeritus of geography at Pennsylvania State University, where he taught from 1967 to 1995, serving as head of the Department of Geography from 1976 to 1982. He was also director of the Geography and Regional Science Program at the National Science Foundation from 1984 to 1988. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1985 and was awarded the Centenary Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society in 1990. He



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--> Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff KEITH F. RUST (Chair) is a vice president and associate director of the statistical group at Westat, Inc. He is also research associate professor at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, and director of statistical operations for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He was the sampling referee for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). H. is primary areas of research are sample survey design, variance estimation, and inference ú from complex survey data. From 1992 to 1998 he was a member of the Committee on National Statistics, and he is now on the editorial board of the Journal of Official Statistics . He received a B.A. from Flinders University of South Australia and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. RONALD F. ABLER is executive director of the Association of American Geographers and a vice president of the International Geographical Union. He serves on the boards of directors of Project Varenius, GIS/LIS, Inc., and the International Geographic Information Foundation and is treasurer of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Sciences. He is professor emeritus of geography at Pennsylvania State University, where he taught from 1967 to 1995, serving as head of the Department of Geography from 1976 to 1982. He was also director of the Geography and Regional Science Program at the National Science Foundation from 1984 to 1988. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1985 and was awarded the Centenary Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society in 1990. He

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--> received honors from the Association of American Geographers in 1995 and was awarded the Victoria Medal by the Royal Geographical Society's Institute of British Geographers in 1996. ROBERT M. BELL is a senior statistician and head of the statistics group at Rand. He has worked on many different projects, mainly in health and education. His primary areas of interest are survey design, survey analysis, and general experimental design issues. He received a B.S. in mathematics from Harvey Mudd College, an M.S. in statistics from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. GORDON J. BRACKSTONE is assistant chief statistician with responsibility for statistical methodology, computing, and classification systems at Statistics Canada. From 1982 to 1985 he was the director-general of the Methodology Branch of Statistics Canada. Previously, he was responsible for surveys and data acquisition in the Central Statistical Office of British Columbia. His professional work has been in survey methodology, particularly assessment of the quality of census and survey data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in statistics from the London School of Economics. MICHAEL L. COHEN, a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently works with the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies and the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and formerly served as study director of the committee's Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems. Previously, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer at the Department of Statistics at Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. JOHN L. CZAJKA is a senior sociologist at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Much of his research has focused on statistical uses of administrative records, analysis of program participation, and the design and analysis of longitudinal data. This work has included designing strategies for handling incomplete data and addressing problems of nonsampling error in a number of contexts. During his many years of research with statistical data developed by the Internal Revenue Service, he prepared a study of

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--> the feasibility of using tax records to count the population. More recently he has conducted research on estimating the number of uninsured children at the national and state levels. He received a B.A. in government from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. MICHEL A. LETTRE is assistant director for planning data services with the Maryland Office of Planning. He has served as the governor's chief staff person on the redistricting advisory committee and also coordinated the governor's 1990 census promotion campaign. His office serves as the principal agency for the distribution of census data in the state of Maryland under the Census Bureau's state data center program. He has an M.S. degree in urban and public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University. D. BRUCE PETRIE is assistant chief statistician at Statistics Canada, responsible for the agency's programs in the area of social statistics, covering labor, household incomes and expenditures, health, education and culture, demography, and the census. In this capacity he had overall responsibility for the past three Canadian population censuses and is currently supervising preparations for the next census in 2001. He served on a previous National Research Council panel charged with evaluating alternative census methods. He has a bachelor of commerce degree from Dalhousie University and an M.B.A. from the University of Western Ontario. NATHANIEL SCHENKER is an associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, he was a mathematical statistician in the Statistical Research Division of the Bureau of the Census. His research interests include missing data, census undercount, survival analysis, and statistical methods for studies of cancer and AIDS. He is a former associate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association , for which he was also editor of a special section, "Undercount in the 1990 Census." He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. STANLEY K. SMITH is a professor of economics and director of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, College of Business, at the University of Florida, Gainesville. He is also director of the bureau's population program, which produces the official state and local population estimates and projections for the state of Florida. He is Florida's representative to the federal-state cooperative program for population

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--> estimates and projections and a past president of the Southern Demographic Association. His research interests include the methodology and analysis of population estimates and projections and the determinants and consequences of migration. He received a B.A. in history from Goshen College and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. LYNNE STOKES is a professor in the Department of Management Science and Information Systems at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research program is focused in the area of sampling, with an emphasis on assessment of nonsampling errors in surveys. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. from the University of the South and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. JAMES TRUSSELL is professor of economics and public affairs, faculty associate of the Office of Population Research, and associate dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author or coauthor of more than 150 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of reproductive health and demographic methodology. He has served on many National Research Council panels, including two previous ones on the census. He received a B.S. in mathematics from Davidson College, a B.Phil. in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. ANDREW A. WHITE is deputy director of the Committee on National Statistics and has served or is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies, the Panel to Review the Statistical Procedures of the Decennial Census, and the Panel to Study the Research Program of the Economic Research Service. He is a former survey designer, research staff chief, and executive staff member of the National Center for Health Statistics and was a consulting statistician with the Michigan Department of Public Health. He directed interdisciplinary research in statistical mapping, survey design, and work in customer satisfaction. He received a B.A. in political science and an M.P.H. and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. ALAN M. ZASLAVSKY is associate professor of statistics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. He was formerly on the faculty of the Department of Statistics at Harvard. His research interests include measurement of quality in health care, census methodology, estimation and correction of census undercount, small-area estima-

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--> tion, microsimulation, design and analysis of surveys, and Bayesian methods. In addition to this panel, he has served or is serving on other panels of the Committee on National Statistics concerned with census methods and with evaluation of small-area estimates of poverty. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He received a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.