DESCRIPTIONS



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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies DESCRIPTIONS

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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies This page in the original is blank.

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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies CASE STUDIES OF U.S. INNOVATIONS IN MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY IN AN INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT International Organization The National Center for Improving Science Education, National Center for Research in Mathematical Sciences Education, Stanford University, and Center for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI/Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) Years of Data Collection Phase One -- 1991-92 Phase Two -- 1992-95 PurposeThe outcome of this two-phase study will be eight intensive case ' contribution to an international effort. The project examines how studies on mathematics and science innovations, the United States innovations in science and mathematics occur around the world. The idea for international case studies of innovation in science, mathematics, and technology education grew out of CERI/OECD member nations' growing concerns for more effective mathematics, science, and technology education programs to serve their populations. They recognized the need to have an in-depth understanding of the policies, programs, and practices that lead to successful innovations in science and mathematics education. Further, they desired a greater understanding of how these innovations in programs, policies, and practices are implemented in different countries and settings. Approaches to reforming education developed in one country may be very helpful to educators elsewhere. Organization and ManagementCoordinated by the Center for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI/Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD]), the National Center for Improving Science Education has the responsibility for the science case studies; the National Center for Research in Mathematical Sciences Education has responsibility for the mathematics studies. Phase Two will be carried out by the National Center for Improving Science Education, the National Center for Research in Mathematical Science of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, and Stanford University. Project staff include The National Center for Improving Science Education director and project director, a subcontractor director, and senior research scientists (Michael Huberman, Mary Budd Rowe, Myron Atkin, Jeremy Kilpatrick, and Doug McLeod). The project includes a subcontract for OECD to catalyze and monitor the data collection in each of the participating member countries during their own national studies. Although many more countries participated in Phase One, OECD will attempt to hold the number of countries participating in Phase Two to six to eight to facilitate quality control. OECD 's monitoring will be carried out through science and mathematics education specialists and will be directed toward tailoring the case studies to meet the methodological requirements of the project and to ensure that questions of common interest are addressed in each country. Design Participants Phase One -- OECD member countries. Phase Two -- Six to eight OECD member countries. SampleIn the main, sampling is based on selecting sites/events that illustrate particularly interesting theoretical or applied issues.

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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies Procedures and Summary of Content Phase One. The scope of work for Phase One entailed selecting the U.S. innovations and writing 20-page case summaries. To complete this work, the following specific activities took place: An advisory board was established consisting of the U.S. representatives to the several planning meetings held by CERI/OECD and added members, including science, mathematics, and case study methodology experts. The advisors will continue to provide guidance throughout Phase Two of the study. The staff and advisory board finalized the selection of the innovations that were to be described in Phase One. The innovations selected were: California's Systemic Improvement of Science Education; Chemistry in the Community (ChemCom); Kids Network; Project 2061; State of California's Restructuring of Mathematics Education; The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards Project; The Urban Mathematics Collaborative Project; and The Voyage of the Mimi. The advisory board met to review the papers produced in Phase One and further refine the plans for the in-depth case studies to be carried out in Phase Two. The California mathematics project was dropped and Contemporary Pre-Calculus Through Applications added. The Phase One papers were revised based on advisory board suggestions and have been published by OECD for international distribution. Phase Two. The work of Phase Two is to document the philosophy, genesis, implementation and, in some cases, routinization of major innovations in science, mathematics, and technology education. A case study design provides for common issues to be explored and analyzed while still paying attention to the unique features of the individual case. Data Collection and Analyses Phase Two: The overall approach for the international study is based on the work of Robert Yin (1984), Michael Huberman, and Matt Miles (1984), and informed by the work of Robert Stake and Jack Easley (1978). Comprehensive, systematic, and in-depth information will be collected through field observations guided by the same general questions. However, different methods of inquiry and analyses will be used to reveal the most salient features of each of the innovations. The case study research will follow events and processes over time, reconstituting milestones that occurred before the researchers picked up the case and carefully documenting unfolding events through a variety of modes. Some of the research questions will have to be general, covering all cases, and others will be project-specific. Michael Huberman has developed a model to guide sampling, collecting, and coding data, carrying out an intermediate analysis, and conducting the final analysis and write-up. For each project, research questions will be grouped, and the coded segments used to respond to each, including illustrative material in the form of excerpts, vignettes, and composite sketches. Alternatively, major themes, leitmotifs, dilemmas, and achievements can be explicated across research questions for each project. Each case will constitute a narrative, with the research questions converted into chapters and the main findings presented at their proper chronological moment. The case studies will not exceed 80 pages each with a three page synopsis. The field research teams will develop, review, and critique

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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies case outlines prior to final write-up; the write-ups also will be reviewed by a small group of critical readers. There also will be a cross-project analysis. Timetable Phase One: (October 1991 to October 1992) 1991-1992 An advisory board was established; the staff and advisory board finalized the selection of innovations to be described in Phase One. The advisory board reviewed Phase One papers and refined plans for Phase Two in-depth case studies. Phase One papers were revised and published. Phase Two: (September 1992 to September 1995) 1992-1995 Information will be collected through field observations. Case study narratives will be published. A cross-project analysis will be published. Publications Phase One papers have been published by OECD for international distribution. Phase Two case study narratives will be published. A cross-project analysis will be published. Funding Phase One and Phase Two funding is provided by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. Information Sources Senta A. Raizen, Director The National Center for Improving Science Education 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 603 Washington, D.C. 20036 telephone: 202/ 467-0652 facsimile: 202/ 467-0659 Bitnet: sentar@gwuvm.gwu.edu Ted Britton, Project Director The National Center for Improving Science Education 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 603 Washington, D.C. 20036 telephone: 202/ 467-0652 facsimile: 202/ 467-0659 e-mail: tbritton@gwuvm.gwu.edu

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International Comparative Studies in Education: Descriptions of Selected Large-Scale Assessments and Case Studies Norman Webb, Senior Researcher National Center for Research in Mathematical Sciences Education Wisconsin Center for Education Research School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin 53706 telephone: 608/ 263-4287 facsimile: 608/ 263-6448 e-mail: normwebb@vms.mace.wisc.edu National Center for Improving Science Education 1992 Case Studies of U.S. Innovations in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in an International Context: Project Summary. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development 1993 Science and Mathematics Education in the United States: Eight Innovations. Publication number 96-93-01-1. OECD, Paris, France. (Available from OECD Publications, Washington, D.C.) Raizen, Senta 1992 Case Studies of U.S. Innovations in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in an International Context. Presentation to the Board on International Comparative Studies in Education. October. ****** NOTE: This study summary was reviewed and edited by Ted Britton at The National Center for Improving Science Education in Washington, D.C. on May 31, 1994.