2

Published Research

The following annotations were prepared from available abstracts by project staff.

CITATIONS FROM JOURNALS

This set of citations includes a number from Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI) that were not retrieved from the direct search of DAI.

Ahrens, WD. 1992 Mary J. Nielubowicz Award recipient. Nursing organizational restructure: choosing to change. Mil Med 1993;158(4):208–12.

This report describes factors that inspired nursing organizational restructure in a naval hospital. The specific modifications made and strategies for managing them are reviewed in the context of using planned-change principles and risk-taking behavior to achieve organizational growth.

Alderson C, Gallimore I, Gorman R, Monahan M, Wojtasinski A. Research priorities of VA nurses: a Delphi study. Mil Med 1992;157(9):462–5.

The purpose of this study was to identify and specify the most pressing questions in nursing research by means of a Delphi survey of a sample of a Veterans Administration Medical Center staff and head nurses.



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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies 2 Published Research The following annotations were prepared from available abstracts by project staff. CITATIONS FROM JOURNALS This set of citations includes a number from Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI) that were not retrieved from the direct search of DAI. Ahrens, WD. 1992 Mary J. Nielubowicz Award recipient. Nursing organizational restructure: choosing to change. Mil Med 1993;158(4):208–12. This report describes factors that inspired nursing organizational restructure in a naval hospital. The specific modifications made and strategies for managing them are reviewed in the context of using planned-change principles and risk-taking behavior to achieve organizational growth. Alderson C, Gallimore I, Gorman R, Monahan M, Wojtasinski A. Research priorities of VA nurses: a Delphi study. Mil Med 1992;157(9):462–5. The purpose of this study was to identify and specify the most pressing questions in nursing research by means of a Delphi survey of a sample of a Veterans Administration Medical Center staff and head nurses.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Alexander L, Beck K. The smoking behavior of military nurses: the relationship to job stress, job satisfaction and social support. J Adv Nurs 1990; 15(7):834–9. Three hundred and seven nurses at a large military medical center completed an anonymous questionnaire that measured their smoking status, job stress, job satisfaction, social support, and a variety of demographic factors. Results are presented and discussed. Andersen CA. Preparing patients for aeromedical transport. J Emerg Nurs 1987; 13(4):229–31. No abstract available. Anna DJ. Assisting the military impaired health-care provider: an advocacy program developed by the Army Medical Department. Issues Ment Health Nurs 1988; 9(2):201–10. No abstract available. Bakas LM, Guzinski MG. The European Intra-Inter Theater Aeromedical Evacuation System: our mission—our attempt. Aviat Space Environ Med 1980; 51(3):290–2. This report discusses the logistics of aeromedical evacuation. The order of magnitude of the problem and detailed analyses are presented. The study also presents examples of patient transfer from point of injury in areas remote from hospitalization through successive installations to the hospital for extended treatment and convalescence. Baker RR, Menard SW, Johns LA. The military nurse experience in Vietnam: stress and impact. J Clin Psychol 1989; 45(5):736–44. Demographic, health, and psychosocial data from two studies are presented on military nurses assigned to Vietnam. Army nurses were the subject of the first study. In the second study, Army nurses were compared with Air Force and Navy nurses. Stress experiences, career dissatisfaction data, and health problems of military nurses and their children are reported. Balacki MF. Battle fatigue intervention: a vital role for nursing. Mil Med 1992; 157(4):192–5. This paper examines the many aspects of battle fatigue from contributing factors to management principles, prevention, and assistance. Beeman TA.The management education and training needs of Army head nurses. Ph.D. diss. The American University 1989; 206 p. The purpose of this study was to identify the management education and training needs of Army head nurses and to determine if there were differences

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies between head nurses and nurse supervisors in relation to related factors: sex, age, rank, degrees held, certifications, continuing education credit, Army course attendance, type of area managed, time in the job, number of personnel managed, and size of hospital. The sample consisted of 175 head nurses and 39 supervisors assigned to randomly selected Army hospitals. Ben HF, Pearson D, Rhee K, Yamada J Does the substitution of a resident for a flight nurse alter scene time?, J Emerg Med 1995; 13(2):151–3. The purpose of this retrospective case control study was to compare the performance of a nurse–resident crew to that of the usual nurse –nurse crew in a helicopter transport service using scene time as a measure of overall teamwork. The study was carried out by a university-based helicopter emergency transport service. Benham E. Coping strategies: a psychoeducational approach to posttraumatic symptomatology. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 1995;33(6):30–5. This paper describes complex posttraumatic and dissociative symptomatology including flashbacks, reexperiencing phenomena, intense affects, and self-destructive impulses. Approaches developed to control these symptoms included healthy diversions, grounding techniques, and support networks. Boyle M, Hatton D, Sheets C. Surgical cricothyrotomy performed by air ambulance flight nurses: a 5-year experience. J Emerg Med 1993; 11(1):41–5. This retrospective study reviewed the performance of surgical cricothyrotomy by air ambulance flight nurse personnel. Braswell LB.A study of the relation of personality, context, level of distress, and coping process, in Army reserve nurses activated in Operation Desert Shield Ph.D. diss. University of Georgia. Dissertation Abstracts International 1993; 53(9-B):4993. No abstract available. Brodie B, Rowell P, Bancroft B, Wolf W. A comparison of nurse practitioner and physician costs in a military out-patient facility. Mil Med 1982; 147(12):1051–3. No abstract available. Burke JB. Field interactions in aerovac nursing. Aviat Space Environ Med 1980; 51(6):618–21. This paper analyzes interactions between the environmental field of an aeromedical evacuation aircraft and the inflight care of patients (the human

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies field). Examination of some stressors of flight—specifically, altitude physiology and sensory alterations—was used to generate testable hypotheses regarding patient care. Burney R, Hubert D, Passini L, Maio R. Variation in air medical outcomes by crew composition: a two-year follow-up. Ann Emerg Med 1995; 25(2) : 187–92. This 2-year prospective cohort study of variation in air medical outcomes was conducted to confirm results from a 1-year retrospective study and to compare outcomes associated with transport crew composition, namely, physician–nurse and nurse–nurse air medical crews, while controlling patient characteristics. Burney R, Passini L, Hubert D, Maio R. Comparison of aeromedical crew performance by patient severity and outcome. Ann Emerg Med 1992; 21(4):375–8. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to compare the severity of illness or injury of patients transported by air ambulance and outcomes for physician–nurse and nurse–nurse crews. Burtnyk S. Secondary transportation of critically ill people—implications for nurses and the need for specialist training.Intensive Crit Care Nurs 1992; 8(4):234–9. This study reviews the complications accompanying the transfer of critically ill patients, implications for staff, and the responsibility of staff should emergencies arise during transport. The need for advanced training is discussed. Carney CM. Perceived symptoms among U.S. Army nurses: the effects of combat environment, gender, control, and social support. Ph.D. diss. George Washington University, Dissertation Abstracts International 1986; 46(11-B):4062. No abstract available. Carson KJ, Drew BJ. Electrocardiographic changes in critically ill adults during intrahospital transport.Prog Cardiovasc Nurs 1994; 9(4):4–12. Using a prospective design, this study sought to describe electrocardiographic changes during intrahospital transport and to describe the nursing implications of transporting patients in this sample. A convenience sample of 29 critical care patients (14 cardiac, 8 neurological, 5 medical, 2 transplant) was selected from three intensive care units at a university hospital.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Clark C, Heidenreich T. Spiritual care for the critically ill. Am J Crit Care 1995; 4(1):77–81. This descriptive study was conducted to identify factors that contribute to providing spiritual care for patients in intensive care units. A convenience sample of 63 patients in the critical care unit of a large midwestern military hospital participated in this study, 1 to 2 days after their transfer from the intensive care unit. Connelly C. An empirical study of a model of self-care in chronic illness. Clin Nurse Spec 1993; 7(5):247–53. This descriptive correlational study was conducted to test the efficacy of the Model of Self-Care in Chronic Illness. The model, an adaptation and extension of the Health Belief Model, was developed to describe and relate the variables that influence effective self-care among ambulatory chronically ill patients. Constable J, Russell D. The effect of social support and the work environment upon burnout among nurses. J Human Stress 1986; 12(1):20–6. This paper presents and discusses research findings on the effects of various aspects of the hospital work environment on burnout among nurses. It also evaluates the effects of social support in reducing or mitigating the relationship between negative aspects of the work environment and burnout. Cook RL. Physician–nurse collaboration: a nurse's perspective. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(11):1179–81. This is a systems analysis of physician–nurse collaboration during an epidemiologic follow-up study of air crewmen with asymptomatic exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia. Cook RL. Nursing introspection: peer review. Aviat Space Environ Med 1980; 51(10):1159–62. A survey of nurses working on in-house units at a U.S. Air Force medical center was conducted. Nursing peer review is presented as an important quality assurance method that is misunderstood widely and not practiced extensively. Cook RL. Nursing peer review: a survey of flight nurse section members. Aviat Space Environ Med 1981; 52(1):50–2. Thirty flight nurse section attendees at the 1980 Aerospace Medical Association meeting participated in a survey regarding nursing peer review. Respondents were middle- to senior-level nurses with a mean age of 39.8 ± 8.1 years and most frequently ranked as military grade of major.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Corcoran DK. Investigation of the relationship between selected variables and the decision-making and managerial ability of head nurses in the Army Nurse Corps. Ph.D. diss. University of Texas, Austin, Dissertation Abstracts International 1981; 42(3-B):967. No abstract available. Crosby F, Ventura M, Finnick M, Lohr G, Feldman M. Enhancing subject recruitment for nursing research. Clin Nurse Spec 1991; 5(1):25–30. Recruitment efforts in four different nursing studies were compared and contrasted in an effort to determine effective and efficient approaches to recruitment of subjects who knowledgeably consent to participate in nursing research. Sample populations included nurse practitioners, patients, nurse aides, and nurse educators. Cunningham N, Marshall C, Glazer E. Telemedicine in pediatric primary care. Favorable experience in nurse-staffed inner-city clinic. JAMA 1978; 240(25):2749–51. Off-site pediatric consultation via bidirectional cable television was instituted to provide backup for nurse practitioners treating sick and well children in a small primary care clinic. Dahl J, O'Neal J. Stress and coping behavior of nurses in Desert Storm. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 1993; 1(10):17–21. This study examined the importance of combat stress-related factors to noncombatant personnel in the combat zone during Desert Storm. Davidson P, Jackson C. The nurse as a survivor: delayed posttraumatic stress reaction and cumulative trauma in nursing. Int J Nurs Stud 1985; 22(1):1–3. An integrated review of previously unrelated areas of research is presented to enhance the understanding of trauma and its impact on the mental health of nurses. Findings from recent studies on delayed posttraumatic stress reactions in Vietnam veterans, victims of natural disasters, and survivors of the holocaust are postulated to delineate symptoms that are also found in stress-prone nurses who are using maladaptive coping strategies in response to hospital-related traumatic episodes.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Delooz H, Verbruggen H, Mangelschots G, De LM, De JS, Meulemans A, et al. Six years experience with an emergency department based mobile emergency care delivery system. Acta Anaesthesiol Belg 1980; 31 Suppl:19–26. The experience gained with a mobile emergency care delivery system, organized within the Emergency Department of the University Hospital Sint-Rafael Leuven, Belgium, is analyzed and discussed. Dewane CJ. Posttraumatic stress disorder in medical personnel in Vietnam. Hosp Commun Psych 1984; 35(12):1232–34. This study explores the unique characteristics of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among physicians, medics, corpsmen and nurses who served in Vietnam. Unique aspects of symptomatology of PTSD in medical personnel are described, including helplessness, survivor guilt, anger, isolation, estrangement, and low frustration tolerance. Diekmann J, Smith J. Strategies for assessment and recruitment of subjects for nursing research. West J Nurs Res 1989; 11(4):418–30. No abstract available. Dreeben J. The role of pre-service interpersonal experiences and family relationships in the post-war adjustment of Vietnam veteran nurses. Ph.D. diss., Boston College. Dissertation Abstracts International 1993; 53(9-B):4950. No abstract available. Eagle J, Fortnum D, Price P, Scruton J. Developing a rationale and recruitment plan for a nurse researcher. Can J Nurs Adm 1990; 3(2):5–10. This study uses a systematic approach to outline, define the need for, and prepare a comprehensive proposal for the recruitment of a nurse researcher. Eastes LE. Evaluating the clinical practice of flight nurses: complexities and innovations. J Nurs Qual Assur 1989; 3(3):75–83. This paper discusses a varied and comprehensive approach to evaluating care, and uses an assortment of methodologies to quantify adequately the quality of care provided by flight nurses. Fiedler F. Validation and extension of the contingency model of leadership effectiveness: a review of empirical findings. Psychol Bull 1971; 76(2):128–48. No abstract available.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Foley J, Foley B. USAR Nurse Referral and Retention Program. Mil Med 1992; 157(9):498–500. This paper describes the Army Nurse Referral and Retention Program, developed and implemented at the 804th Hospital Center, which relieved the shortfall of registered nurses in the United States. Ford M, Lake L. Establishing an audit system for Air Evac. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(3):284–9. In this study, a pilot project was formulated to determine the validity of the audit tool used to determine the effectiveness of nursing interventions. Frelin A, Oda D, Staggers N. The clinical nurse specialist role in the Army Medical Department. Clin Nurse Spec 1990; 4(3):147–50. In this study, a survey was conducted of all practicing clinical nurse specialists in the Army Medical Department and their supervisors. Its purpose was to define their perceived role and the value placed on this role by their supervisors. Gaudinski MA. Intangibles facilitating or inhibiting health care delivery systems. Aviat Space Environ Med 1978; 49(9):1111–4. This paper reviews and discusses (1) basic concepts of general systems theory; (2) application of general systems theory to health care delivery systems including Air Evac systems; (3) intangibles in systems that facilitate or inhibit health care delivery; and (4) suggestions to facilitate open systems and the delivery of quality care. Gaudinski MA. Coping with expanding nursing practice, knowledge, and technology. Aviat Space Environ Med 1979; 50(10):1073–5. This paper reviews and discusses (1) factors associated with burnout-distress phenomena identified in professional literature; (2) factors associated with expanded roles and practice that contribute to burnout stress; (3) identification of factors in military and civilian air ambulance and aeromedical evacuation systems that contribute to burnout stress; and (4) recommendations for strategies to prevent and cope with burnout-distress factors. Gibbs I, McCaughan D, Griffiths M. Skill mix in nursing: a selective review of the literature. J Advanced Nursing 1991; 16(2):242–9. This review covers manpower planning, including the mix of nurses required to provide the necessary care for patients; staff turnover; and the use of less qualified staff in relation to cost containment and other factors.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Gilbert MA, Smithco MJ, Huff CM, Robinson R. Quantitative applications: forecasting and costing nursing service at an Army community hospital. Mil Med 1994; 159(3):210–3. This study describes the utilization of a quantitative method of forecasting, coupled with an existing patient classification system, to provide a creative costing tool for managing nursing resources at military medical facilities. Gill PM. Korean hemorrhagic fever: nursing care critical to recovery. Mil Med 1991; 156(3):131–4. This paper discusses the Korean hemorrhagic fever disease process and appropriate nursing actions to avert serious progression of the disease. Goldberg G, Jolly D, Hosek S, Chu D. Physician's extenders' performance in Air Force clinics. Med Care 1981; 19(9):951–65. This study evaluates the quality of care of physician's extenders (PEs: 23 physician's assistants, 7 primary care nurse practitioners) in Air Force primary medicine clinics. It is part of an examination of effects on quality of care when PEs assume a considerable portion of the care formerly provided by physicians in the military medical system. Griffin J, Carroll S, Devos J, Kowba M, Moran J, O'Hare PJ, et al. Nursing research priorities for the care of the naval hospital patient: a Delphi survey. Mil Med 1992; 157(11):608–10. The purpose of this study, which used the Delphi technique, was to identify priorities for nursing research in a naval hospital. A general objective was to provide empirically based information to guide the development of a nursing research program at a regional medical treatment facility. Harrahill M, Bartkus E. Preparing the trauma patient for transfer. J Emerg Nurs 1990; 16(1):25–8. This article describes how to prepare the patient for transfer. It stresses the need for cooperation between referring and receiving hospitals. Hines-Martin V, Ising M. Use of art therapy with posttraumatic stress disordered veteran clients. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 1993; 31(9):29–36. This paper addresses a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to intervene in maladaptive coping patterns of the posttraumatic stress-disordered veteran. The approach uses art therapy and nursing that emphasize both client-controlled expression of emotions and client-focused step-by-step behavior modification that promotes feelings of effectiveness in behavioral change.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Hunt R, Carroll R, Whitley T, Bryan-Berge D, Dufresne D. Adverse effect of helicopter flight on the ability to palpate carotid pulses. Ann Emerg Med 1994; 24(2):190–3. The purpose of this study was to determine if the air medical helicopter environment compromises the ability to palpate carotid pulses. Using a carotid pulse model, flight nurses were tested for their ability to palpate the simulated carotid pulse at normal (120/80 mm Hg) and low (80/60 mm Hg) blood pressures on the ground and during helicopter flight. Jackson JN. Occupational stress, strain and coping among active duty military and Department of Army civilian practical nurses. Ph.D. diss., Catholic University of America. Dissertation Abstracts International 1987; 48(6-A):1549–50. No abstract available. Janelli L, Jarmuz P. Motivational factors that affect the retention of reserve nurses in 8 aeromedical evacuation flights. Aviat Space Environ Med 1987; 58(4):375–8. The purpose of the study was to identify the motivational factors that contribute to the retention of reserve flight nurses in aeromedical evacuation flights. A convenience sample of 69 reserve flight nurses from eight flights was utilized in the survey approach. Jennings BM. Stress, locus of control, social support, and psychological symptoms among head nurses. Res Nurs Health 1990; 13(6):393–401. This study evaluated relationships among work stress, nonwork stress, locus of control, social support, and psychological symptoms of head nurses from U.S. Army hospitals. Jennings BM. Nursing implications of the Department of Defense Coordinated Care Program. Mil Med 1993; 158(12):823–7. This paper presents an overview of the Coordinated Care Program and identifies and discusses the major nursing implications. John K. The diagnostic approach: the usefulness of the DSM-III and systematic interviews in treatment planning. Special Issue: A woman's recovery from the trauma of war. Women & Therapy 1986; 5(1):91–99. This study discusses the usefulness of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) in assessing a case study of an alcoholic woman suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder resulting from her experiences as a military nurse in Vietnam. The design and development of the DSM-III and the role of the structured diagnostic interview are outlined.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Johnson LD. An analysis of the Veterans Administration health professional scholarship program: an educational strategy to recruit and retain professional nurses. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania 1989; 380 p. This study compared two groups of scholarship participants selected by different methods to determine the correlation among selection method, completion of academic program, performance of service obligation, and variables influencing participants' satisfaction and intent to remain employed by the Veterans Administration after completion of service obligations. Factor analysis of data from 312 participants who were performing their service obligation yielded six scales: five scales measuring influences on intent to stay with or to leave Veterans Administration employment after completion of service obligation, and one scale measuring satisfaction and intent to remain with the Veterans Administration. Jones AP. Organizational reward systems: implications for climate. Motivation Emotion 1984; 8(3):259–74. Researchers investigated the role of organizational reward structures on individual perceptions of the reward climate. The 73 military nurses and 50 civilian nurses in a naval hospital worked for the same supervisors but were subject to either tenure-contingent or behavior-contingent reward systems. Jones DR. Aeromedical transportation of psychiatric patients: historical review and present management. Aviat Space Environ Med 1980; 51(7):709–16. This article reviews the transport of psychiatric patients and discusses an aeromedical classification system that indicates the need for restraints, sedation, and properly trained attendants. It discusses the importance of preflight planning to deal with situational anxieties, consider the aeromedical implications of psychotropic medications, and anticipate disruptive behaviors. Jones JA. Effects of the Alcoholism Awareness Workshop on Air Force nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of alcoholism. Ed.D. diss., The American University 1991; 234 p. This study utilized a pretest–posttest experimental design to examine the effects of an 8-hour Alcoholism Awareness Workshop on a sample of Air Force nurses' knowledge of alcoholism and attitudes toward alcoholics. A knowledge measurement tool, the Jones Alcoholism Inventory, and an attitude measurement tool, the Tolor and Tamerin Attitudes Toward Alcoholics Inventory, were used for pre- and posttest data collection.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Ellis, Wayne Enoch. Determining Proficiencies in Spinal Anesthesia Using the Delphi Technique (Anesthesia Programs, Nurse Anesthesia Program). Ph.D. diss., Texas A & M University 1990. Utilizing the Delphi technique, this study was initiated to determine proficiencies for individuals completing anesthesia training programs. The study further compared the differences between military and civilian medical communities. Fagerland, Kathleen Joy. Attitudes, Beliefs, and Significant Others Influencing the Expectant Woman's Participation in Childbirth Education Classes. M.S. thesis, The University of Utah, College of Nursing 1987. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to identify the attitudes, beliefs, and significant others influencing the expectant woman's participation in childbirth education classes. A survey of a convenience sample of expectant women was conducted at a military facility. Fleshin, Diane J. The Homeless Military Veteran: A Comparative Analysis with the Nonveteran Homeless. M.S. thesis, San Jose State University 1991. This retrospective comparative study, conducted at three National Guard armories that sheltered homeless individuals, was undertaken to see if differences exist between the nonveteran homeless and the homeless military veteran. In addition, veterans who served in combat were compared with the non-combat exposed to examine differences between these subgroups. French, Diana Gail. An Investigation of the Beliefs of Registered Nurses Towards Service in the Army Nurse Corps, Reserves (Military, Recruitment, Attitude). Ph.D. diss., The University of Toledo 1986. An investigation was undertaken, using Martin Fishbein's behavior-intention model as the conceptual framework, to examine the beliefs of registered nurses in the state of Ohio toward service in the Army Nurse Corps Reserve. Data were collected from 334 registered nurses, both civilian and Army Reserve. Gournic, Joyce Loraine. Patient Integration: Toward a Theory of Moral Development of Experienced Clinical Nurses. Ph.D. diss., George Mason University 1994. The purpose of this qualitative research was to develop a substantive theory of moral development, using grounded theory methodology, to describe the process of moral development of experienced clinical nurses. Sampling diversity included number of years of clinical experience, practice setting, age, education, and such considerations as geographic mobility, military and civilian employment, and marital status.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Graham, Ruth M. The Effect of Work Specialty, Demographic Variables, and Social Support upon the Perceived Job Stress of Military Nurses. M.A. thesis, University of the Pacific 1989. This retrospective study sought to (1) investigate differences in the type of stressors and level of job stress reported by nurses working in intensive care or coronary care units, medicine–surgery, and other specialty areas; (2) examine the relationship between perceived job stress and social support; and (3) determine whether five demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, level of educational training, and military rank) had moderating effects on job stress. A sample of 231 military nurses completed a demographic inventory, the Nursing Job Stress Instrument, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Grendell, Ruth Naomi. Baccalaureate Reentry Students: Effects of Professional Support on Role Conflict and Role Transition (Reentry Students). D.N.Sc. diss., University of San Diego 1991. This study surveyed 206 registered nurses and 37 Navy corpsmen to examine the interrelationships of multiple roles and focal role commitments, previous education, work experience, and role conflicts perceived by reentry adult students. It also examined the influence of professional support in the subsequent transition to the professional role. Haines, Theresa Lynn. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Women. M.S. thesis, Pacific Lutheran University 1993. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the documented risk factors for coronary heart disease demonstrated by women and men who were diagnosed and treated for coronary heart disease in a 90-bed military hospital over a 3-year period. Data were collected by retrospective chart review. Harrity, Mary Catherine. The Characteristics of the Military Retirees Who Volunteered as Civilians for a U.S. Army Family Support System During Operation Desert Shield/Storm. M.S. thesis, D'youville College 1992. This study was designed to identify the characteristics of the military retirees who volunteered as civilians in a family support group at a military compound during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Using a theory of goal attainment as a conceptual framework within which military retiree volunteers were studied, a 15-item, investigator-designed questionnaire was completed by 17 subjects. Harwick, Michelle Anne. Relationships Among Preventive Behavioral Model Concepts in Individuals at Risk for Coronary Artery Disease. M.S. thesis, The University of Arizona 1989. The purpose of this research was to describe relationships among preventive behavior model concepts in military-affiliated individuals at risk for coronary

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies artery disease. One hundred forty-three subjects were recruited by their primary care physician and were requested to complete questionnaires measuring health beliefs, health locus of control, value orientations, and health care activities. Hatcher, Barbara Jones. Predictors of Well-Being Among Army National Guard Nurse Officers. Ph.D. diss., George Mason University 1994. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of well-being. The study was guided by published theoretical perspectives of stress and coping and of well-being. Study participants included 149 Army National Guard nurse officers who deployed to Southwest Asia. Heroman, Karen Messersmith. Pregnancy Outcome in Military and Civilian Women. D.N.Sc. diss., University of San Diego 1990. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if two groups of pregnant women—military enlisted and civilian dependents—differed in selected risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, weight gain, prenatal care, work patterns, life stress, and social support) or in pregnancy outcome (infant birth weight and gestational age). Jacobs, Marianne Scherer. The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: The Vietnam Experiences of and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Female Nurse Veterans (Veterans). Ph.D. diss., University of Washington 1990. This dissertation is a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the Vietnam and readjustment experiences of 257 female nurse veterans, based on questionnaire responses and interviews. Responses to a questionnaire documented demographic and military characteristics, experiences prior to and in Vietnam, homecoming, subsequent experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and use of and attitudes toward the Veterans Administration. Jensen, Richard Gerald. Determinants of Outpatient Health Services Utilization by Army Retirees and Spouses. Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1989. This study investigated a set of 25 factors thought to influence the sources and volumes of outpatient health care used by Army retirees and spouses. Subjects included 262 men and women randomly selected from a list of 19,834 Army retirees and spouses. Jones, Tempsie Lavern. Leadership Styles of Army and Civilian Nurse Administrators. M.S. thesis, Texas Woman's University 1991. In this study, a nonexperimental descriptive design was used to determine the differences in leadership styles between Army nurse administrators in military hospitals and civilian nurse administrators in civilian hospitals. The sample

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies consisted of 30 nurse administrators: 15 Army nurse administrators from military hospitals throughout the United States and 15 civilian nurse administrators from civilian hospitals throughout Texas. Kelly, Joyce Wood. A Study to Develop a Model of Anesthesia Care Provided by a Team of Physicians and Nurses. Ed.D. diss., Pepperdine University 1991. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of anesthesia care provided by a team of physicians and nurses. The research objectives were to (1) identify and report characteristics and components of a conceptualized model of anesthesia care provided by a team of physicians and nurses, (2) determine the feasibility of a conceptualized model, (3) formulate a model of anesthesia care, and (4) make recommendations regarding implementation of the model of anesthesia care. Kroskey, Diane Lynn. Factors Affecting the Nutritional Status of Pregnant Women. M.S. thesis, The University of Arizona 1989. This study attempted to determine the effects of gastrointestinal discomforts, socioeconomic status, dietary knowledge, and beliefs about foods to avoid during pregnancy on the nutritional status of pregnant women in their second trimester. Indicators of nutritional status included hemoglobin, upper-arm muscle circumference, weight for height, and eating patterns. Subjects were 20 active-duty or dependent wives of Air Force service members of rank E-4 and below. Larkin, Jude Owen. Health Service Utilization in the Near Retirement Period by Both Husband and Wife in Selected Military Families: An Exploratory Study. Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1983. This study explored the relationship between the perception of the magnitude of life change in military retirement and health service utilization by both spouses (n = 76) in 38 military families nearing retirement. In addition, it examined the effects of work and retirement attitudes, social support, and generalized expectancies of locus of control on the relationship between life change and health service utilization. Mauro, Kathleen. Military Life Stress, Personal Resources, and Birth in the Military Community (Childbirth). Ph.D. diss., The University of Michigan 1995. This longitudinal, correlational study examined the relationships among demographic characteristics, military life stress, mastery, social support, gender role identity, overnight separations, and perception of birth in 69 civilian women married to active-duty soldiers. Subjects were selected nonrandomly from the population of all third-trimester primigravida women without chronic illness or gestational problems planning to deliver at one of two Army hospitals.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies McKay, Priscilla Sandford. Examining the Nature and Extent of Professional Staff Nurse Participation in Patient Care Decision-Making (Autonomy, Interdependence). Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland Baltimore Professional Schools 1985. Professional autonomy of hospital staff nurses was examined by using patient care-specific measures of independent and interdependent decision making. The purpose was to describe staff nurse involvement in decisions for which nurses have professional authority and accountability —decisions that had not been examined adequately in the literature. A stratified random sample of 260 full-time military and civilian staff nurses working on 52 inpatient units in four medical centers was asked to complete a self-report questionnaire. McNulty, Margaret Anne. Eating Disorders Among Active Duty Female Navy Nurses: Who, When and Why? Dr.P.H. diss., University of Hawaii 1994. This was a descriptive and correlational study to determine the prevalence of eating disorders among active-duty female Navy nurses and further to identify factors that might predispose female Navy nurses to exhibit eating disorders. Menard, Shirley Ann Waltz. Critical Learning Incidents of Female Army Nurse Vietnam Veterans and Their Perceptions of Organizational Culture in a Combat Area (Women Veterans, Nurses). Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1993. This retrospective study investigated unique critical learning incidents and perceived organizational culture as described by female Army nurse Vietnam veterans. The following questions were answered: (1) What is the nature of critical learning incidents described by female Army nurse Vietnam veterans during their service in Vietnam? (2) What is the relationship between the type of learning described by female Army nurse Vietnam veterans and the perceived organizational culture of military hospitals in Vietnam? (3) What is the nature of the difference between critical learning incidents of female Army nurse Vietnam veterans with less than versus those with more than 2 years of professional nursing experience prior to their service in Vietnam? Moorhead, Sue Ann. Nurses' Job Satisfaction, Commitment, Search Behavior and Intent to Leave the Air Force: A Test of a Causal Model (United States Air Force). Ph.D. diss., The University of Iowa 1993. The purpose of this research was to develop and estimate a causal model of job satisfaction, commitment, search behavior and intent to leave the Air Force. Three perspectives—economics, psychology, and sociology—provide the conceptual basis for the study.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Neal, Leslie Jean. The Coping Ability of Military Parents of Disabled Children. M.S. thesis, San Jose State University 1992. This descriptive and exploratory study addresses the coping ability of military parents of disabled children who were assigned to an Army post in northern California. It examines the perceptions, beliefs, feelings, and concerns of parents whose children's disabilities ranged from epilepsy to Walker–Warburg syndrome and whose ages ranged from 8 months to 17 years. Nichols, Mary Reid. Adjustment to New Parenthood: Relationship Among Prenatal Factors, Intrapartal Events, and New Parent Experiences for Primiparous Mothers and Fathers Who Share Childbirth. Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1992. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between selected components of a synthesized model of adjustment to new parenthood in couples who share the childbirth experience. Subjects were military couples who were married, living with their spouses, and expecting their first child. The study specifically examined the relationship among prenatal factors, intrapartal events, and selected new parenthood experience variables. O'Brien, Timothy Tracy. Patterns of and Barriers to Child Safety Seat Use Within Military Families. M.S.N. thesis, University of Florida College of Nursing 1992. This descriptive study determined the relationships between the pattern of child safety seat use and parental perceptions of the time required for proper use of seatbelts and safety, the anticipatory guidance parents receive, awareness of state law, parental use of seatbelts, and selected demographic variables. The sample consisted of 100 military active-duty families who presented a child weighing 40 pounds or less to a naval medical treatment facility for pediatric care. O'Neill, Jacquelyn S. An Exploration of the Process of Coping as Experienced by Nurses Who Served in the Vietnam War. Ph.D. diss., The University of Texas at Austin 1990. The purpose of this study was to explore theoretical dimensions of the process of coping as experienced by women who were placed in extreme psychological and physical circumstances. All the participants (n = 12) were military registered nurses who had served at least one tour in Vietnam, at which time their median age was 24 years. Rich, Irene Aurelia Meyers. General Pregnancy Attitudes, Ambivalence, and Psychological Symptom Distress During Pregnancy. D.N.Sc. diss., The Catholic University of America 1993. A beginning theoretical model was developed to show the relationships among general pregnancy attitudes, ambivalence, and psychological symptom distress

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies during pregnancy. Women from three participating military hospitals were provided research instruments in prepaid mailers. Richman Lisa R. Parental Caretaker Stress and Coping During Military Deployment of Spouse for Operation Desert Storm. M.S.N. thesis, University of Florida 1993. Using a sample of 57 wives and 11 husbands of military personnel deployed in Desert Storm, this study compared responses to the Primary Caretaker and Ways of Coping questionnaires. Research questions addressed differences between wives and husbands in perceived stress levels; use of emotion- and problem-focused coping; and perceptions of whether the preparation, separation, or reunion period was the most stressful deployment period. Roach, Cynthia L. Whittig. Perceived Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity, and Work Satisfaction of the Army Reserve Nurse. D.S.N. diss., The University of Alabama in Birmingham 1991. The purpose of this descriptive, exploratory study of activated Army Reserve nurses was to determine correlations among six factors of work satisfaction (pay, autonomy, organization policies, task requirements, professional status, and interactions), role conflict, and role ambiguity. Specific demographic variables were analyzed to ascertain if predictive models could be developed to determine career intentions. Roup, Brenda Jacobs. Factors Associated with Universal Precautions Compliance by Critical Care Nurses. Ph.D. thesis, University of Maryland Baltimore Professional Schools 1995. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance with universal precautions by direct observation and by self-report questionnaire in a random sample of critical care nurses in a military medical center. Additionally, the investigator examined knowledge, attitudes, and supply and equipment variables that might impact the rate of compliance. Rupkalvis, Carol Anne Cude. The Relationship of Health with Role Attitudes, Role Strain, and Social Support in Enlisted Military Mothers. M.S. thesis, The University of Arizona 1987. No abstract available. Schempp, Catherine Mary. Quality of Life in United States Soldiers with HIV Infection (Immune Deficiency). D.N.Sc. diss., The Catholic University of America 1994. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationships among and between health locus of control, social support, sickness impact, life satisfaction, and quality of life in soldiers at different stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This study included a total of 140 male HIV-infected military

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies members at different stages of the disease process, stage 1 to stage 6, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Simmons, Susan Johnston. Self-Care Agency and Health-Promoting Behavior of a Military Population. Ph.D. diss., Medical College of Georgia 1990. This study examined the extent to which exercise of self-care agency and the basic conditioning factors of age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, military rank, duty type, formal education, and perceived health state explained reported performance of health-promoting behaviors in a military population. The Health-Promoting Self-Care System Model was developed from three nursing frameworks and tested in a random sample of 421 active-duty Navy men and women. Spurlin, Anne Ruth. Critical Analysis of Tasks Performed by United States Air Force Nurses with Varying Levels of Professional Education. Ed.D. diss., Columbia University Teachers College 1981. This study was designed to analyze the specific tasks of practice of Air Force nurses to determine the impact of their educational preparation on the nature of their practice of nursing. The study addressed the question: What are the relationships among the level of professional education of Air Force nurses, the types of tasks they perform, the degree of complexity of those tasks, and the percentage of time spent by them in the performance of three specific types of tasks? Variables included were military grade, geographic location, type of health care setting, length of military service, and duty Air Force specialty code. Strong, Julie Kay. Characteristics of Military Members Hospitalized with a Psychiatric Diagnosis During the Persian Gulf War. M.S.N. diss., University of Florida College of Nursing 1992. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe characteristics of military members serving in the Persian Gulf War who were hospitalized with a psychiatric diagnosis. Data were collected by reviewing charts and computerized records of a convenience sample of 99 military members from one Air Force treatment facility. Stuhlmiller, Cynthia Marie. An Interpretive Study of Appraisal and Coping of Rescue Workers in an Earthquake Disaster: The Cypress Collapse (California, Loma Prieta Earthquake). D.N.S. diss., University of California, San Francisco 1991. This dissertation examined the effects of disaster rescue work, focusing on the perspective of rescuers at the collapse of the Interstate-880 Cypress Street viaduct following the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. It explored the rescuers' motivations, actions, coping strategies, interactions, and under

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies standing of and the responses to the event, as well as the practical wisdom each acquired. Forty-two military pararescuers, fire fighters, Department of Transportation workers, and coroner–investigators were interviewed 6 months after the event. Vail, James David. Knowledge Essential for Nursing Judgment in the Clinical Administration of Oxygen: Double Nasal Cannula or Face Mask Method. D.N.Sc. diss., The Catholic University of America 1980. The purpose of this experimental study was to answer the question: Is the arterial oxygen tension of mouth breathers more effectively raised by using the oxygen mask or the oxygen double nasal cannula? The 34 subjects for this study were solicited from a large military medical battalion. Varda, Janice Lynne. Behaviors of Military Personnel to Attain or Maintain Desired Weight Prior to Mandatory Weight Surveillance. M.S. thesis, The Ohio State University, College of Nursing 1989. The purpose of this study was to identify preparatory behaviors of military personnel to attain or maintain desired weight prior to mandatory weight surveillance. An investigator-designed questionnaire, which included a demographic section and a list of 21 potential weight reduction behaviors, was distributed to active-duty military personnel at a midwestern Air Force base. Weigle-Spier, Candice Lynn. Trauma and Moral Thinking: Military Nursing in Vietnam. Psy.D. diss., Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology 1994. This theoretical study examined the effects of moral thinking on the experience of trauma, the impact of trauma on moral thinking, and the ways in which the content of Vietnam nurse-veterans' moral thinking about war was affected by combat-related trauma. Whitford, Marguerite Elizabeth. Women of Military Families' Health Beliefs as Related to Their Initiation of Early Prenatal Care. M.S. diss., California State University, Long Beach 1990. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted to investigate the social, psychological, and demographic factors that may explain the reasons for delayed prenatal care in women of military families. The sample of 62 pregnant women had been referred from a military clinic to private obstetrical care.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Williamson, Gail J. A Comparative Study of Role Perceptions of Head Nurses in Military and Nonmilitary Hospitals. M.S. diss., Texas Woman's University 1992. This descriptive study evaluated how head nurses in seven nonmilitary and seven military hospitals perceived their roles. Questionnaires used for this activity evaluated job variability, expertise, definition, capacity, and incentives. Yoder, Linda Helen. A Descriptive Study of Career Development Relationships Experienced by Army Nurse Corps Staff Nurses and Self-Reports of Professionalism, Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Stay. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania 1992. The purpose of this study was to examine the context and demographic profile of the types of career development relationships experienced by Army staff nurses, and to investigate the relationship between the presence of a career development relationship and nurses' self-reports of professionalism, job satisfaction, and intent to stay in the military. The population studied consisted of a random sample of Army staff nurses. A scannable questionnaire packet was developed by using the following instruments: the Alleman Mentoring Scale, Hall's Professionalism Scale, the Nursing Work Index, and Hoppock's Job Satisfaction Scale.

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