Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies

Committee on Military Nursing Research

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1996



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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Committee on Military Nursing Research INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20418 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of the report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for this report were chosen for their special competencies and with regard for appropriate balance. The report to which this is an addendum, The Program for Research in Military Nursing: Progress and Future Direction, has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. This current volume of bibliographies was not subject to report review. The Institute of Medicine was chartered in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to enlist distinguished members of the appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. In this, the Institute acts under both the Academy's 1863 congressional charter responsibility to be an adviser to the federal government and its own initiative in identifying issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine. Support for this project was provided by the Department of Defense through the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and Contract No. MDA905-95-C-0023. The views presented in this publication are those of the Committee on Military Nursing Research and are not necessarily those of the sponsor. Copies of the report, The Program for Research in Military Nursing: Progress and Future Direction, are available for sale from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Lock Box 285, Washington, DC20055. Call 800/624-6242 or 202/334-3313 (in the Washington Metropolitan area). Additional copies of Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies (in electronic or published form) and published copies of the report, The Program for Research in Military Nursing: Progress and Future Direction, are available from: Director, REA Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. 4301 Jones Bridge Road Bethesda, MD 20814 Copyright 1996 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost cultures and religions since the beginning of recorded history. The image adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is based on a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the Staatlichemuseen in Berlin.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NURSING RESEARCH RUTH MCCORKLE * (Chair), School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia GERALDENE FELTON (Cochair), College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City LINDA BURNES BOLTON, Nursing Research and Development, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California PETER I. BUERHAUS, Harvard Nursing Research Institute, Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts MARIE COWAN, Office of Nursing Research, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle SARA FRY, School of Nursing, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts VICKI STOVER HERTZBERG, Department of Biostatistics, The Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia EUGENE A. HILDRETH, * The Reading Hospital and Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania, Reading HAZEL W. JOHNSON-BROWN Center for Health Policy, College of Nursing and Health Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia (retired December 95) CAROL LEDBETTER, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Houston Health Science Center SUSAN LEEMAN, † Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Boston University, Massachusetts KATHLEEN ANN LONG, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville SHARON SEARLS MAILEY, School of Nursing, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. HAL MORGENSTERN, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public health, University of California at Los Angeles BARBARA REDMAN, School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs JEAN M. REEDER, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada BONNIE ROGERS, Occupational Health Nursing Program, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill DAVID D. SCHNAKENBERG, American Society for Clinical Nutrition, Incorporated, Bethesda, Maryland LEE SECHREST, Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson CHRISTINE SULLIVAN, Bixby Medical Center, Adrian, Michigan * Member of the Institute of Medicine. † Member of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Study Staff ALLISON A. YATES, Division Director CAROL W. SUITOR, Study Director MARY I. POOS, Senior Program Officer GEORGE DAVATELIS, Program Officer YVETTE J. BENJAMIN, Research Associate SHEILA MOATS, Research Associate DIANE R. JOHNSON, Project Assistant GAIL E. SPEARS, Administrative Assistant JAMAINE L. TINKER, Financial Associate, September 995–March 1996 CARLOS GABRIEL, Financial Associate, April 1996–present

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Preface This set of bibliographies was prepared to accompany the report The Program for Research in Military Nursing: Progress and Future Direction (IOM, 1996). That report is based on a study conducted by the Committee on Military Nursing Research of the Institute of Medicine at the request of the TriService Military Nursing Research Group (TSNR Group), which manages the TriService Military Nursing Research Program (TSNR Program), acting through the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. The TSNR Program was established in fiscal year (FY) 1992 when Congress added $1 million dollars to Department of Defense (DOD) appropriations to allow military nurses to conduct clinical research. This amount was increased to $2 million in FY 1993, $3 million in FY 1994, and $5 million in FY 1995 and 1996. In FY 1994, the goal of this program was designated as the improvement of nursing care for DOD beneficiaries by expanding the body of scientific knowledge upon which military nursing practice is based. In September 1995, the TSNR Group asked the Institute of Medicine to review the TSNR Program to date and to make recommendations on program management, areas for future research funding, and allocation of resources to program functions. In addition, the TSNR Group also requested a review and interpretation of the current literature and other relevant information concerning military nursing research, and preparation of an annotated bibliography of references resulting from the review. The Institute of Medicine appointed a 20-member multidisciplinary committee (1) to identify gaps in current research related to military nursing, and (2) to provide guidance on research priorities, program management, and allocation of program resources. With guidance from the committee, study staff conducted

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies an extensive search to identify relevant studies from the published literature and from government reports of currently funded research. The committee had access only to the citations with available abstracts and used a deliberative process to develop its recommendations. The broad scope of the search resulted in retrieval of more than 2,000 citations of published work and over 300 citations for current research, exclusive of TriService Nursing Research Program Grants. Citations of published works that were obviously not relevant to the study were deleted by study staff. At the conclusion of the study, the list of citations covering published works had been narrowed to approximately 600 references. This volume lists those references and current research citations. Chapter 1 outlines the search terms and on-line databases used to locate relevant articles and studies. Chapter 2 provides annotated listings of published research from journals, dissertations, and technical reports, and Chapter 3 provides annotated listings of published historical research from the same sources as Chapter 2. Chapter 4 provides citations for Navy Nurse Corps theses and dissertations, and Chapter 5 provides listings of miscellaneous published reports of relevance to military nursing. Chapter 6 contains abstracts for the research that has been funded to date by the TriService Nursing Research Program plus annotations for current nursing research supported by the National Institute for Nursing Research and the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is hoped that potential investigators, current investigators, and Armed Forces practitioners will benefit from these bibliographies. Because of the large number of databases searched, these listings include studies that might be missed by routine searching and that might provide leads for other searches. The listings of current research can stimulate communication among investigators with related interests that will facilitate the growth of military nursing research programs. Review of the combination of published works and work in progress can suggest further aspects of research that have been ignored or require attention and, thus, will be helpful in the establishment of research priorities by the TSNR Program. The electronic version of Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies provides great flexibility in the use of references (to order, see page ii).

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies REFERENCE Institute of Medicine (IOM). 1996. The Program for Research in Military Nursing: Progress and Future Direction. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. (To order, see page ii.)

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies This page in the original is blank.

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Military Nursing Research: Bibliographies Contents  1   SEARCH STRATEGIES   1  2   PUBLISHED RESEARCH   3      Citations from Journals,   3      Citations from Technical Reports,   23      Citations from Dissertations Abstracts International,   54  3   PUBLISHED HISTORICAL ARTICLES   69      Citations from Journals,   69      Citations from Technical Reports,   75      Citations from Dissertations Abstracts International,   76  4   NAVY NURSE CORPS THESES AND DISSERTATIONS   81  5   PUBLISHED MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES   95      Citations from Journals,   95      Citations from Technical Reports,   109  6   RESEARCH IN PROGRESS   113      TriService Nursing Research Program,   113      National Institute of Nursing Research,   170      Nursing Research Initiative of the Department of Veterans Affairs,   230     ACRONYMS   235