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concerns of laboratories would be understood more broadly by policy-makers. A white paper produced under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences (or some other body) espousing the current situation and needs would also be a positive step.

CONCLUSIONS

Although a wide variety of issues were discussed during the workshop, discussions at the workshop continually focused on three issues:

  • Performance-based standards.

  • Legislative remedies versus regulatory remedies.

  • Overlapping jurisdictions.

Participants felt that a followup to this meeting would be desirable and that GUIRR should consider three actions:

  • Mounting of an analogue of the Federal Demonstration Project for laboratory-waste management. The Executive Branch might consider such a project if the staff and budget needs were minimal. For such a project to proceed in earnest, EPA, OSHA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy would need to endorse it in principle and be prepared to give serious consideration to the result.

  • Development of a number of products to assist those in research universities. Possible products include pamphlets on hazardous-waste disposal, model waste-management structures in universities, faculty-member guidance, and university-community environment relations. The concept would not be to provide manuals (as the prudent practices committee is developing), but rather to provide management and policy guidance. The activity would need to be coordinated with related activities of the American Chemical Society and similar organizations.

  • Sponsorship of roundtable sessions for information exchange. There seems to be little opportunity for those involved with hazardous-waste management in research laboratories to come together to share ideas. GUIRR could sponsor such a meeting on a recurring basis. Costs could be borne by participants.

GUIRR needs to decide what the parameters of some future action should be. This could include a letter from the chair to agency heads exploring the concept of a demonstration project, temporary waivers, or some of the other ideas suggested for action.



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THE MANAGEMENT AND COST OF LABORATORY WASTE ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH: Report of a Workshop concerns of laboratories would be understood more broadly by policy-makers. A white paper produced under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences (or some other body) espousing the current situation and needs would also be a positive step. CONCLUSIONS Although a wide variety of issues were discussed during the workshop, discussions at the workshop continually focused on three issues: Performance-based standards. Legislative remedies versus regulatory remedies. Overlapping jurisdictions. Participants felt that a followup to this meeting would be desirable and that GUIRR should consider three actions: Mounting of an analogue of the Federal Demonstration Project for laboratory-waste management. The Executive Branch might consider such a project if the staff and budget needs were minimal. For such a project to proceed in earnest, EPA, OSHA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy would need to endorse it in principle and be prepared to give serious consideration to the result. Development of a number of products to assist those in research universities. Possible products include pamphlets on hazardous-waste disposal, model waste-management structures in universities, faculty-member guidance, and university-community environment relations. The concept would not be to provide manuals (as the prudent practices committee is developing), but rather to provide management and policy guidance. The activity would need to be coordinated with related activities of the American Chemical Society and similar organizations. Sponsorship of roundtable sessions for information exchange. There seems to be little opportunity for those involved with hazardous-waste management in research laboratories to come together to share ideas. GUIRR could sponsor such a meeting on a recurring basis. Costs could be borne by participants. GUIRR needs to decide what the parameters of some future action should be. This could include a letter from the chair to agency heads exploring the concept of a demonstration project, temporary waivers, or some of the other ideas suggested for action.