APPENDIX B

Biographies of Committee Members

Gerald A. Cann chaired the Committee on Alternative Uses of Naval Technology. He is senior adviser to the Executive Office of Raytheon Company. Mr. Cann graduated from New York University in 1953 and served two years in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. He is a former assistant secretary of the Navy (Research, Development, and Acquisition). Mr. Cann has more than 40 years of experience in senior management, including more than 20 years in industry and 20 years in the government specializing in technology application, system development, and acquisition. He has extensive experience in program development, program execution, and reorganization of major business units. He is a member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Mary Altalo is associate vice chancellor of marine science, University of California, San Diego, and deputy director for scientific affairs, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She earned a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Altalo has held positions at the Chesapeake Bay Institute at Johns Hopkins, the College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware, Martin Marietta, the Biological Oceanography program at the National Science Foundation, and the Oceanic Biology program at the Office of Naval Research. Dr. Altalo has research interests in phytoplankton bloom formation in nearshore waters and has used acoustic and remote sensing techniques to track bloom formation. She served on the Ocean Studies Board Committee on High-Priority Science to Meet National Coastal Needs and is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board.



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Expanding the Uses of Naval Ocean Science and Technology APPENDIX B Biographies of Committee Members Gerald A. Cann chaired the Committee on Alternative Uses of Naval Technology. He is senior adviser to the Executive Office of Raytheon Company. Mr. Cann graduated from New York University in 1953 and served two years in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. He is a former assistant secretary of the Navy (Research, Development, and Acquisition). Mr. Cann has more than 40 years of experience in senior management, including more than 20 years in industry and 20 years in the government specializing in technology application, system development, and acquisition. He has extensive experience in program development, program execution, and reorganization of major business units. He is a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Mary Altalo is associate vice chancellor of marine science, University of California, San Diego, and deputy director for scientific affairs, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She earned a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Altalo has held positions at the Chesapeake Bay Institute at Johns Hopkins, the College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware, Martin Marietta, the Biological Oceanography program at the National Science Foundation, and the Oceanic Biology program at the Office of Naval Research. Dr. Altalo has research interests in phytoplankton bloom formation in nearshore waters and has used acoustic and remote sensing techniques to track bloom formation. She served on the Ocean Studies Board Committee on High-Priority Science to Meet National Coastal Needs and is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board.

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Expanding the Uses of Naval Ocean Science and Technology William Berry is president of Applied Remote Technology, which directs the development of enabling technologies for undersea vehicle systems. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of New Hampshire and an M.A. in public administration from the University of Northern Colorado. He has extensive experience in undersea systems development and production. Charles Black is president of the Mardela Corporation. He has extensive experience in marine technology and as a marine adviser over a broad range of maritime issues. Mr. Black has served as president of the Mardela Corporation since 1968 and chairman of the Marquest Group, Inc., in Bourne, Massachusetts, since 1983. He has been involved with the design, manufacture, and operation of equipment for deep-ocean search, positioning, and imagery and has conducted pioneering work in oyster and marine gastropod aquaculture. Mr. Black has served on a number of national and international marine advisory panels, including the Indian Ocean Fisheries Commission, the Conference on the Law of the Sea, the Marine Fisheries Advisory Commission of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Advisory Committee on the Oceans and Atmosphere. Anthony Calio is executive vice president of Hughes Information Technology Corporation. He is a former undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, and assistant administrator for space application for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). He holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, is a Sloan Fellow from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, and holds a D.Sc. from Washington University. Dr. Calio was the recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Service medal, Exceptional Scientific Achievement medal, and Distinguished Service medal. Edward Liszka is associate director of the Applied Research Laboratory (ARL) at Pennsylvania State University. He directs the major technology and development programs performed by ARL, including weapons technology, underwater acoustics, and undersea vehicles. Dr. Liska is a past manager of the Navy’s technology efforts for undersea weapons guidance and control and was awarded the Navy’s Special Achievements Award. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Catholic University of America. William Silcox is retired from a vice presidency at Wellstream Corporation and a long career with Chevron Corporation as senior offshore engineer in its Offshore Technology and Planning Staff. Mr. Silcox holds a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley, and has been a consultant to the National Science Foundation’s Deep Sea Drilling Project, the National Petroleum Council Task Group on Arctic Oil and Gas Reserves, and the American Petroleum Institute. He

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Expanding the Uses of Naval Ocean Science and Technology is a former member of the Marine Board of the National Research Council and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Malcolm Spaulding is a professor of ocean engineering at the University of Rhode Island. He earned a B.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Spaulding studies numerical modeling of coastal and shelf processes to predict oil spill fates and impact and pollutant transport. Glenn Stoner is an expert on bioelectrochemistry and marine corrosion control. He holds degrees from the University of Missouri and University of Pennsylvania and is currently professor of materials science and engineering and director of the Center of Electrochemical Sciences and Engineering at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Dr. Stoner has taught courses in corrosion throughout the United States, Europe, and the Middle East, and is a consultant with several companies and national laboratories. He holds 12 patents and is the author of 75 publications in electrochemistry and corrosion.

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