B
Biographical Sketches

JOHN D. BRANSFORD (Co-chair) is Centennial professor of psychology and co-director of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College of Education and Human Development, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the university's John F. Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning and their facilitation, with special emphasis on the importance of using technology to enhance learning. His projects include the videodisc-base Jasper Woodbury Jasper Problem Solving Series, the Little Planet Literacy Series, and other projects that involve uses of technology to enhance thinking and learning in literature, science, history, and other areas. Bransford currently serves as a co-chair for the National Research Council's Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning and is a member of the National Academy of Education. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Minnesota.

JAMES W. PELLEGRINO (Co-chair) is the Frank W. Mayborn professor of cognitive studies at the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the application of cognitive research and technology to instructional problems on human cognition and cognitive development. Dr. Pellegrino currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Foundations of Educational and Psychological Assessment. He has been a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a B.A. in psychology from Colgate University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees



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B Biographical Sketches JOHN D. BRANSFORD (Co-chair) is Centennial professor of psychology and co-director of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College of Education and Human Development, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the university's John F. Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning and their facilitation, with special emphasis on the importance of using technology to enhance learning. His projects include the videodisc-base Jasper Woodbury Jasper Problem Solving Series, the Little Planet Literacy Series, and other projects that involve uses of technology to enhance thinking and learning in literature, science, history, and other areas. Bransford currently serves as a co-chair for the National Research Council's Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning and is a member of the National Academy of Education. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Minnesota. JAMES W. PELLEGRINO (Co-chair) is the Frank W. Mayborn professor of cognitive studies at the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the application of cognitive research and technology to instructional problems on human cognition and cognitive development. Dr. Pellegrino currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Foundations of Educational and Psychological Assessment. He has been a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a B.A. in psychology from Colgate University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees

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from the University of Colorado, both in experimental, quantitative psychology. DAVID BERLINER is professor of educational leadership and policy studies professor of curriculum and instruction, and professor of psychology in education at Arizona State University. His recent research has focused on the study of teaching, teacher education, and education policy. His publications include Putting Research to Work in Your Schools (1993, with U. Casanova) and A Future for Teacher Education (1996). Dr. Berliner currently serves on the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment. Among his many awards are the research into practice award of the American Educational Research Association, and the Distinguished Service Award of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. He has served as president of the American Psychology Association's division of educational psychology and the American Educational Research Association. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University and has taught at California State University at San Jose, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of Arizona. MYRNA S. COONEY is a teacher with over 35 years of classroom experience. She currently teaches grades 6 and 7 at the Taft Middle School in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and serves on curriculum committees for language arts and social Studies. She has previously caught grades 4, 5, and 6 at Cleveland Elementary School in Cedar Rapids. Ms. Cooney has a B.A. in education from Coe College and an M.A. in education from the University of Iowa. She has been an instructor in a reacher-in-service program at the University of Iowa and a teacher-in-residence at Vanderbilt University. M. SUZANNE DONOVAN (Study Director) is a senior program officer at the National Research Council's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and study director for the Committee on Minority Representation in Special Education. Her interests span issues of education and public policy. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Policy and was previously on the faculty of Columbia University's School of Public and International Affairs. ARTHUR EISENKRAFT is the science coordinatory (grades 6–12) and physics teacher in the Bedford Public Schools in Bedford, New York. He has taught high school physics in a variety of schools for 24 years. Dr. Eisenkraft is currently on the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consor-

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tium Science Standards Drafting Committee, and on the National Research Council's Advisory Panel to the Center for Science Mathematics and Engineering Education. He is the editor and project manager of the National Science Foundation-supported Active Physics Curriculum Project of the American Institute of Physics and the American Association of Physics Teachers. His many publications include a lab text on laser applications, an audiotape history of the discovery of nuclear fission, middle school and high school curriculum materials, and numerous audiovisual productions. He holds a U.S. patent for a laser vision testing system. Dr. Eisenkraft serves on several science award committees and has served as executive director for the International Physics Olympiad. He has a Ph.D. in science education from New York University and received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching in 1986. HERBERT P. GINSBURG is the Jacob H. Schiff foundation professor of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His work focuses on the intellectual development and education of young children, particularly poor and minority children. He has conducted research on the development of mathematical thinking and cognition in children, examining the implications for instruction and assessment in early education. His many publications include The Development of Mathematical Thinking (1983), Piaget's Theory of Intellectual Development (1988), Children's Arithmetic (1989), Entering the Child's Mind: The Clinical Interview, in Psychological Research and Practice (1997), and The Teacher's Guide to Flexible Interviewing in the Classroom (1998). Dr. Ginsburg currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy and on the Committee on Strategic Education Research Program Feasibility Study. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and has taught at Cornell University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Rochester. PAUL D. GOREN is the director of Child and Youth Development, Program on Human and Community Development, at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Previously, he was the executive director of policy and strategic services for the Minneapolis Public Schools and spent two years teaching middle school history and mathematics. He also worked as the director of the Education Policy Studies Division of the National Governors' Association, and as the coordinator of planning and research for the Stanford Teacher Education Program. He has a Ph.D. from the Stanford

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University School of Education (1991) and an M.P.A. from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas (1984). JOSÉ P. MESTRE is a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research interests include cognitive studies of problem solving in physics, with a focus on the acquisition and use of knowledge by experts and novices. Most recently, his work has focused on applying research findings to the design of instructional strategies that promote active learning in large physics classes, and on developing physics curricula that promote conceptual development through problem solving. He is currently a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning and its Mathematical Sciences Education Board; the College Board's Sciences Advisory Committee, SAT Committee, and Council on Academic Affairs; the Educational Testing Service's Visiting Committee; the American Association of Physics Teacher's Research in Physics Education Committee and of the editorial board of The Physics Teacher, and the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology's Expert Panel. He has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. ANNEMARIE SULLIVAN PALINCSAR holds a chair in the University of Michigan's School of Education, where she prepares teachers, teacher educators, and researchers to work in heterogeneous classrooms. She has conducted extensive research on peer collaboration in problem-solving activity, instruction to promote self-regulation, the development of literacy among learners with special needs, and the use of literacy across the school day. She is an editor of the books, Strategic Teaching and Learning and Teaching Reading as Thinking. Her cognition, and instruction article on reciprocal teaching (co-authored with Ann Brown in 1984) is a classic. Dr. Palincsar currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. She received an early contribution award from the American Psychological Association in 1988 and one from the American Educational Research Association in 1991. In 1992 she was elected a fellow by the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities She has M.A, and Ph.D. degrees in special education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ROY PEA is director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, in Menlo Park, California, and consulting professor in the School of Education at Stanford University. He also directs the multi-institutional Center

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for Innovative Learning Technologies, which aims to create a national knowledge network for catalyzing best practices and new designs for improving learning with technologies among researchers, schools, and industries. Previously, he was a John Evans professor of education and the learning sciences at Northwestern University, where he founded and chaired the learning sciences Ph.D. program and served as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy. He works as a cognitive scientist to integrate theory, research, and the design of effective learning environments using advanced technologies, with particular focus on science, mathematics, and technology, Dr. Pea currently serves on the National Research Council's Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning. He has a doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford, England, where he was a Rhodes scholar.