take advantage of new technologies risk being left behind. What will be the long-term effects of a shift away from traditional teaching?

These are difficult questions that cannot be completely answered today. But they make it clear that, as science-driven technologies continue to grow in importance, they will transform the ways people communicate, do business, and conduct their lives. The pace of discovery in science is accelerating, as is the pace of technological advance and the adoption of new technologies. Some of the changes that these new technologies cause in human life will be disruptive, but these technologies also offer the potential for great improvements in the quality of our lives.

REFERENCES

1. Vannevar Bush. Science, the Endless Frontier. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1945 (reprinted 1990).

2. Bruce L.R. Smith. American Science Policy Since World War II. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 1990.

3. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Renewing the Promise: Research-Intensive Universities and the Nation Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.

4. National Science Board, Committee on Industrial Support for R&D. The Competitive Strength of U.S. Industrial Science and Technology: Strategic Issues. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1992.

5. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Megaprojects in the Sciences. Washington, D.C.: Office of Science and Technology Policy, 1992.

6. U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. Federally Funded Research: Decisions for a Decade. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991.

7. Task Force on the Health of Research. Chairman’s Report to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.

8. Committee on Science, Technology, and Public Policy, Panel on Technology and Employment. Technology and Employment: Innovation and Growth in the U.S. Economy Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1987.



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