BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

JOHN F. AHEARNE is currently Director of the Sigma Xi Center; Adjunct Scholar, Resources for the Future; and Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Lecturer in Public Policy, Duke University. He has served as Executive Director for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society; Vice President and Senior Fellow for Resources for the Future; Commissioner and Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and numerous positions within the Department of Defense. Dr. Ahearne chairs the National Research Council committee on the Environmental Management Science Program and the Committee to Review the Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) and is co-chair or vice-chair for three additional Research Council committees. Dr. Ahearne received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics and a M.S. in physics from Cornell University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Society for Risk Analysis, and American Nuclear Society; and a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the AAAS.

EDWIN L. CARSTENSEN, Ph.D., is Senior Scientist in Electrical Engineering and Arthur Gould Yates Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at the University of Rochester. Dr. Carstensen received his B.S. from the Nebraska State Teachers College, his M.S. from Case Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include the ultrasonic and dielectric properties of biological media and the biologic effects of ultrasound and extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields. Dr. Carstensen is the author of the Biological Effects of Transmission Line Fields (Elsevier, 1987). Dr. Carstensen is a fellow of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, the Acoustical Society of America, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is the 1991 recipient of the AIUM's Joseph Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award and the 1992 recipient of the IEEE's Career Achievement Award. Dr. Carstensen was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1987.

RAYMOND L. ERIKSON, Ph.D., is the John F. Drum American Cancer Society Professor of Cellular and Developmental Biology at Harvard University. Since the mid-1970's, he has been interested in the role of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of cellular functions. His laboratory is responsible for the identification of the Rous sarcoma virus src gene product and for the characterization of its protein kinase activity. Other studies have resulted in the identification, purification and cloning of protein kinases involved in signal transduction. In addition to being a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Prof. Erikson has served on the Frederick Cancer Research & Development Center Advisory Committee and has been the recipient of several awards, including the Lasker Basic Science Award and the Sloan Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation.

MAURICE FOX is the Lester Wolfe Professor of Molecular Biology, Emeritus, and was the Head of the Department of Biology (1984–1989) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Fox's area of expertise is genetics and he is currently carrying out



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Research on Power-Frequency Fields: Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES JOHN F. AHEARNE is currently Director of the Sigma Xi Center; Adjunct Scholar, Resources for the Future; and Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Lecturer in Public Policy, Duke University. He has served as Executive Director for Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society; Vice President and Senior Fellow for Resources for the Future; Commissioner and Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and numerous positions within the Department of Defense. Dr. Ahearne chairs the National Research Council committee on the Environmental Management Science Program and the Committee to Review the Research Activities Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) and is co-chair or vice-chair for three additional Research Council committees. Dr. Ahearne received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics and a M.S. in physics from Cornell University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Society for Risk Analysis, and American Nuclear Society; and a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the AAAS. EDWIN L. CARSTENSEN, Ph.D., is Senior Scientist in Electrical Engineering and Arthur Gould Yates Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at the University of Rochester. Dr. Carstensen received his B.S. from the Nebraska State Teachers College, his M.S. from Case Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include the ultrasonic and dielectric properties of biological media and the biologic effects of ultrasound and extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields. Dr. Carstensen is the author of the Biological Effects of Transmission Line Fields (Elsevier, 1987). Dr. Carstensen is a fellow of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, the Acoustical Society of America, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is the 1991 recipient of the AIUM's Joseph Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award and the 1992 recipient of the IEEE's Career Achievement Award. Dr. Carstensen was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1987. RAYMOND L. ERIKSON, Ph.D., is the John F. Drum American Cancer Society Professor of Cellular and Developmental Biology at Harvard University. Since the mid-1970's, he has been interested in the role of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of cellular functions. His laboratory is responsible for the identification of the Rous sarcoma virus src gene product and for the characterization of its protein kinase activity. Other studies have resulted in the identification, purification and cloning of protein kinases involved in signal transduction. In addition to being a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Prof. Erikson has served on the Frederick Cancer Research & Development Center Advisory Committee and has been the recipient of several awards, including the Lasker Basic Science Award and the Sloan Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation. MAURICE FOX is the Lester Wolfe Professor of Molecular Biology, Emeritus, and was the Head of the Department of Biology (1984–1989) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Fox's area of expertise is genetics and he is currently carrying out

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Research on Power-Frequency Fields: Completed Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 research on gene mutation and stability. Dr. Fox is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. JAMES F. HOBURG, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has held academic positions since 1975. He received his B.S. from Drexel University and his S.M. and Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Hoburg's research interests include applied electromagnetics, magnetic shielding, and electromechanics. He has published 45 archival journal articles and 3 book chapters, and holds two U. S. patents. He has served as a consultant to numerous companies, has served on and chaired NSF graduate fellowship evaluation panels, and is a member of several professional organizations including the IEEE, the Electrostatics Society of America, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Hoburg has served on numerous academic committees at Carnegie Mellon University and is a winner of the university-wide undergraduate teaching award as well as student-selected departmental teaching awards in several years. WALTER R. ROGERS, an Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences in the University of Texas School of Public Health and the Department of Family Practice at the Medical School of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, received his Ph.D. in physiological psychology from the University of Iowa in 1972. He became a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology in 1988; his specialty is neurotoxicology. Dr. Rogers joined the University of Texas School of Public Health in September, 1997, after 23 years at Southwest Research Institute, an independent, not-for-profit R&D; organization. There he directed a large USA-Japan research program examining the effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of the baboon. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Bioelectromagnetics Society. He served on the NIEHS working group. He also studied the cardiopulmonary interactions of cigarette smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and exercise in baboons. Other experiments examined the development of cigarette habituation and the effects of maternal smoking on the fetus and neonate. He has conducted combustion toxicology experiments and examined the neurobehavioral effects of organophosphates; he also is familiar with pre-clinical testing of new drugs and devices. Dr. Roger's current research is an effort to develop a rat model for neurobehavioral sensitization to inhaled substances: the goal is to demonstrate the phenomenon and then to study the basic mechanisms of sensitivity to low-level chemical exposures. JAN A. J. STOLWIJK, Ph.D. is the Susan D. Bliss Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, Emeritus, at the Yale University School of Medicine. He was chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health from 1981–1989, and from 1993–1994. Research interests have included photomorphogenesis in plants, studies of the measurement of thermal pain and of thermoregulatory physiology in exercise and environmental exposures. Mathematical simulation studies of thermophysiology and thermoregulation were developed from such studies. He has been a member of a number of Research Council committees of possible health effects of electromagnetic fields, and