Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Peter O. Kohler, M.D. (Chair), is president of Oregon Health Sciences University. Prior to coming to Oregon, he was dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio and was previously interim dean and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Arkansas. He served as chair of the Oregon Health Council, a statewide group advising the governor on health policy issues. Of special interest to him is the Area Health Education Center program. Dr. Kohler is immediate past chair of the Association of Academic Health Centers. He previously served on the Committee on Evaluating Telemedicine of the Institute of Medicine.

Richard D. Della Penna, M.D., holds several concurrent positions: assistant clinical Professor of medicine, University of California (San Diego) School of Medicine; physician-in-charge of continuing care services, home health, and hospice with the San Diego Kaiser Permanente Medical Program; and regional elder care coordinator for the Southern California Permanente Medical Program and national clinical lead of Kaiser Permanente' s Care Management Institute's Elder Care Initiative. He serves on the Interregional Committee on Aging for the Kaiser Permanente National Program and is a member of the Regional Home Health Committee for the Southern California region. Additionally, he is the principal investigator, Implementing Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training for Practicing Professionals in association with the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Garfield Foundation; as well as a planning group and faculty member



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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Peter O. Kohler, M.D. (Chair), is president of Oregon Health Sciences University. Prior to coming to Oregon, he was dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio and was previously interim dean and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Arkansas. He served as chair of the Oregon Health Council, a statewide group advising the governor on health policy issues. Of special interest to him is the Area Health Education Center program. Dr. Kohler is immediate past chair of the Association of Academic Health Centers. He previously served on the Committee on Evaluating Telemedicine of the Institute of Medicine. Richard D. Della Penna, M.D., holds several concurrent positions: assistant clinical Professor of medicine, University of California (San Diego) School of Medicine; physician-in-charge of continuing care services, home health, and hospice with the San Diego Kaiser Permanente Medical Program; and regional elder care coordinator for the Southern California Permanente Medical Program and national clinical lead of Kaiser Permanente' s Care Management Institute's Elder Care Initiative. He serves on the Interregional Committee on Aging for the Kaiser Permanente National Program and is a member of the Regional Home Health Committee for the Southern California region. Additionally, he is the principal investigator, Implementing Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training for Practicing Professionals in association with the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Garfield Foundation; as well as a planning group and faculty member

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care for the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, End of Life Collaborative. He received his M.D. from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1969, completing his internship and residency with Harvard Medical Service, Boston City Hospital. Dr. Della Penna is currently licensed to practice medicine in the State of California. He is American board certified in family practice with added qualifications in geriatrics. Penny Hollander Feldman, Ph.D., is vice president for research and evaluation and director of the Center for Home Care Policy and Research at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY). Prior to joining VNSNY, Dr. Feldman served on the faculties of the Kennedy School of Government and the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health, where she continues as visiting lecturer. At VNSNY, she directs research projects focused on improving the quality, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of home-based care; supporting informed policy making by federal, state, and local decision makers; promoting equitable access and outcomes for older persons, especially those who are disadvantaged; and strengthening methods for home care research. Dr. Feldman is the program director of the Home Care Research Initiative, a national research program established by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 1995. She has served as the chair of the Strategic Planning Committee and on the Board of Directors of the Visiting Nurse Affiliates of Cambridge as well as on the Board of Directors of the Health Action Forum of Boston and the Policy Advisory Committee of Health Care for All of Boston. She earned her Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. Janet E. George, R.N., M.A., is recently retired from the positions of assistant vice president, director of clinical systems, with HCR ManorCare and was previously vice president of quality improvement with ManorCare, Inc. In these capacities, Ms. George developed and directed quality improvement programs and supervised quality improvement specialists who facilitated and trained facility staff in the integration of the quality process into management and delivery of care. Until her retirement after 22 years of long-term care experience, Ms. George contributed to the development of practice standards within HCR ManorCare and to clinical practice guidelines in the long-term care industry. Ms. George is a past member of American Healthcare Association's Ethics Subcommittee and of its Professional Development Work Group and Clinical Practice Guidelines Subcommittee. Ms. George is a registered nurse with a bachelor's degree in nursing and a master of arts degree in human resource development.

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care Charlene Harrington, Ph.D., R.N. (who earned her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley), is professor of sociology and nursing and immediate past chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She is the principal investigator of several research studies on state long-term care policies and program characteristics (since 1980), a study to design and develop a nursing home consumer information system about quality (Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research 1995 –1999), and a study of Medicare consumer quality-of-care complaints. She evaluated the Social Health Maintenance Organizations demonstration (1985-1990) and is a member of the team developing second-generation projects. She served on the IOM Committee to Study Nursing Home Regulation (1983–1985), the Committee to Study Hospital and Nursing Home Staffing (1995-1996), and the current Committee on Improving Quality in Long-Term Care. In her 20 years of research experience at the University of California, San Francisco, she has completed numerous research studies and articles on long-term care and managed care. Rosalie A. Kane, D.S.W., is a professor of public health at the University of Minnesota, where she is also on the faculty of the Center for Biomedical Ethics and the School of Social Work. Since 1989, she has directed a Long-Term Care Resource Center, providing technical assistance, research and development, and information dissemination to advance state efforts in home and community-based care. Previously, she was a social scientist at the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, California, and a faculty member at the University of California at Los Angeles and, before that, at the University of Utah, from which she also received a doctoral degree in social work. Her research emphases focus on long-term care for disabled older persons and other dependent groups, including quality of care, assessment, case management, home care, nursing home care, and more recently, the study of values and ethics. Between 1988 and 1992, she was editor-in-chief of The Gerontologist. Presently, she leads a national study on “Measurement, Indicators, and Improvement of the Quality of Life in Nursing Homes” and a national study on the “Home Care/Assisted Living Connection.” Dr. Kane has served on the IOM Committee on Nursing Home Regulation, 1983–1985, its Committee to Evaluate the LTC Ombudsman Programs (1993 –1994), the National Advisory Council on Geriatrics and Gerontology for the Veterans Administration, and the 1997–1998 Veteran Administration 's Committee on the Future of Aging Programs. She is a senior fellow of the Brookdale Foundation and has served on numerous task forces and committees, including the Scientific and Medical Advisory

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care Board of the Alzheimer's Association. Publications include The Heart of Long-Term Care (1988), coauthored with Robert L. Kane and Richard C. Ladd; (with Robert Kane) Long-Term Care: Principles, Programs and Policies (1987), Assessing the Elderly: A Practical Guide to Measurement (1981); Long-Term Care in Six Countries: Implications for the United States (1976); (with Arthur Caplan) Everyday Ethics: Resolving Dilemmas in Nursing Home Life (1990); Ethical Conflict in the Management of Home Care: Case Manager's Dilemma (1993), and (with Joan D. Penrod) Family Caregiving in an Aging Society: Policy Perspectives (1995). Vincent Mor, Ph.D., is director of the Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research at Brown University. Dr. Mor has been the principal investigator of more than 12 National Institutes of Health grants and contracts to conduct program evaluations in aging and long-term care. He was one of the authors of the congressionally mandated Minimum Data Set for nursing home resident assessment and has published widely on a range of topics in gerontology including hospice, physical functioning, long-term care, cancer treatment patterns, patient outcomes, and residential care facilities. Vivian Omagbemi, M.S., R.N., is the long-term care ombudsman for the Montgomery County Aging and Disability Services in Rockville, Maryland, a position she has held since 1983. Prior to this appointment, she was a community health nurse for the Montgomery County Health Department in Rockville, Maryland, and a nurse practitioner in occupational health at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She holds a B.S. in nursing from Adelphi University in New York and an M.S. in nursing from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. She is also a registered nurse in the State of Maryland. James M. Perrin, M.D., is associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, director of the Division of General Pediatrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for Children, and director of the MGH Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy. He formerly chaired the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Children with Disabilities and was president of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, whose journal, Ambulatory Pediatrics, he currently edits. For the American Academy of Pediatrics, he also co-chairs a committee to develop a practice guideline for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A graduate of Harvard College and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, he had his training in pediatrics at the University of Rochester and has been on the pediatric faculties of the University of Rochester and Vanderbilt University, with an additional appointment at the Institute for

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care Public Policy Studies at Vanderbilt University. His research has examined asthma, middle-ear disease, children's hospitalization, and chronic childhood illnesses and disabilities, with a recent emphasis on studies of the Supplemental Security Income Program for children and adolescents. He coauthored Chronically Ill Children and Their Families and Home and Community Care for Chronically Ill Children. He is a member of the National Advisory Council of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He served on the Institute of Medicine 's Committees on Maternal and Child Health Under Health Care Reform and on Home-Based and Long-Term Care and Quality, the National Commission on Childhood Disability, and the Disability Policy Panel of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Laurie E. Powers, Ph.D., is associate professor of pediatrics, psychiatry, and public health, co-director of the Center on Self-Determination, and director of research for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long-Term Disabilities at Oregon Health Sciences University. She specializes in issues related to disability, self-determination, and health through research, policy analysis, and model development activities. At Dartmouth Medical School, Dr. Powers was an assistant professor and the associate director of the Hood Center on Family Support. Dr. Powers serves as a member of many professional committees and has served as a reviewer for a number of different professional journals. She is editor of several books and author of numerous chapters, articles, videotapes, and lectures. She earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology (American Psychiatric Association approved) at the University of Oregon. Ellen T. Reap is vice president at Adventist HealthCare where she heads the Senior Living Services company, which operates nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day care programs, and a HUD senior housing facility. She formerly served as the State of Delaware's director of the Office of Health Facilities Licensing and Certification, where she was responsible for regulating all levels of health facilities and programs, as well as directing the State Survey Agency. She was twice president of the National Association of Health Facility Survey Agencies, the professional organization of the states' health inspection officials. She served as an impact assessment adviser to the Health Care Financing Administration administrator on the implementation of nursing home enforcement regulations and has testified on nursing home quality of care issues before the Senate Special Committee on Aging. She previously served with HCFA, where she was involved with the survey and certification programs for nursing homes, home health, and end-stage renal disease. Prior to entering government service, she served in a variety of leadership roles in

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care home health, nursing homes, and hospitals. Ms. Reap received her B.S. in nursing from The Catholic University of America. John F. Schnelle, Ph.D., is director of the UCLA–Jewish Home Borun Center, and research health scientist, Veterans Administration Medical Center—Sepulveda. His research has focused on ways to improve quality health care for nursing home residents. In addition, Dr. Schnelle has received various awards and honors including the Shannon Award from the National Institutes of Health and the Brookdale Award from the National Institute on Human Resources and Aging. Dr. Schnelle received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Tennessee. Paul M. Schyve, M.D., is senior vice president of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). From 1989 until 1993, he was vice president for research and standards, and from 1986 until 1989, the Director of Standards at the Joint Commission. Prior to joining JCAHO, Dr. Schyve was the clinical director of the State of Illinois Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities. He received an undergraduate degree from the University of Rochester. He completed his medical education and residency in psychiatry at the University of Rochester, and has subsequently held a variety of professional and academic appointments in the areas of mental health and hospital administration, including director of the Illinois State Psychiatric Institute and clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Chicago. Dr. Schyve is certified in psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He has published in the areas of psychiatric treatment and research, quality assurance, continuous quality improvement, health care accreditation, and health care ethics. Eric G. Tangalos, M.D., is professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine and chair of the Division of Community Internal Medicine at Mayo Rochester. He is director of information transfer at the Mayo Alzheimer's Disease Center and an investigator in Mayo's Alzheimer's Disease Patient Registry. Dr. Tangalos has served as President of the Minnesota Medical Directors Association and is past president of the American Medical Directors Association. He is a governor of the American College of Physicians –American Society of Internal Medicine. He is also a member of the board of the National Alzheimer's Association and the board of Friends of the National Library of Medicine. He was one of only two physicians appointed by President Clinton to the Advisory Committee of the 1995 White House Conference on Aging.

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care Arthur Y. Webb has been president and CEO of Village Care of New York since 1993. Village Care of New York is a community-based health care organization providing services to geriatric persons and people with AIDS. Previously, Mr. Webb was a research professor and senior fellow at the Institute for Health Policy, the Heller School, Brandeis University, and commissioner of the New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities. He is a member of the Board of Directors and of the Executive Committee for the New York Association of Services and Homes for the Aging. Other associations of which he is a member include the Healthcare Association of New York State and the Greater New York Hospital Association. Arthur Webb received his education from New York University, completing comprehensive exams in health policy, American government, and comparative political systems. Joshua M. Wiener, Ph.D., is a specialist in Medicaid, health care for the elderly, and long-term care and has worked more than 25 years as a health care researcher and government official. Dr. Wiener is the author or editor of seven books and more than 70 articles on long-term care, health reform, health care rationing, and maternal and child health. His books include Caring for the Disabled Elderly: Who Will Pay?, Sharing the Burden: Strategies for Public and Private Long-Term Care Insurance; and Rationing America's Medical Care: The Oregon Plan and Beyond. His most recent book is Persons with Disabilities: Issues in Health Care Financing and Service Delivery. Along with Lewin-VHI, Inc., he developed the Brookings-ICF Long-Term Care Financing Model, a microsimulation model that projects the use and cost for long-term care into the future. Prior to coming to the Urban Institute in April 1996, Dr. Wiener was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution for almost 12 years. Before that, he worked for the Health Care Financing Administration, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, the Congressional Budget Office, the New York State Moreland Act Commission on Nursing Homes and Residential Facilities, and the New York City Department of Health. Dr. Wiener earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University. Keren Brown Wilson, Ph.D.,* co-founded Assisted Living Concepts, Inc., and served as its president, CEO, vice chair, and a director of the com- *   In 1999, class action securities litigation (unrelated to assisted living quality of care issues) was filed against Assisted Living Concepts, Inc., several of its former and present officers and directors, including Dr. Wilson, its independent auditors and underwriters. In September, 2000, the Company, its underwriters, and the individuals, including Dr. Wilson, stipulated to settlement. The Company's auditors remain in the pending litigation.

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Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care pany until October 19, 2000. She currently serves as founder/advisor to the company and as president of the Jessie F. Richardson Foundation. Dr. Wilson has 25 years of experience in aging services delivery systems and has, for the past 20 years, focused primarily on assisted living. From 1988 to September 1994, she was president and sole director of CCL, a company specializing in the development and management of assisted living residences. From 1986 to 1988, she served as senior vice president at Milestone, Inc., an assisted living development and management company. She was responsible for designing, developing, and managing the State of Oregon's first assisted living residence along with the state's first Medicaid-eligible assisted living residence. She serves on the Board of the American Society on Aging, is chair of Assisted Living Federation of America, and is a member of the Portland State University Foundation Board.