REFERENCES AND NOTES

1. Michael Dertouzos (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), referenced in Peter J.Denning, “Massive Parallelism in the Future of Science” American Scientist, vol. 77, 1989, pp. 16–18.

2. Primary Mapping Economic Analysis: Phase I, September 1987, U.S. Geological Survey, 23 pp. plus addendum (33 pp. plus 25 pp. of tables). Primary Mapping Economic Analysis: Phase II, November 1988, U.S. Geological Survey, 31 pp. plus appendixes.

3. Proceedings of Federal Map Users Conference on National Topographic Program, U.S. Department of the Interior, October 5–6, 1964, Washington, D.C.

4. The Digital Spatial Data Industry Market Place, prepared for the USGS by International Data Corporation, January 10, 1983, Framingham, Mass.

5. “Reflections on the Revolution: The Transition from Analogue to Digital Representation of Space, 1958–1988,” The American Cartographer, vol. 15, No. 3, July 1988 (special issue, B.B.Petchenik, ed.), pp. 245–322.

6. R.Kling and W.Scacchi, “The Web of Computing: Computer Technology as Social Organization,” Advances in Computers, vol. 21, M.C.Yovitz, ed., Academic Press, New York, p. 6, 1982.



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Spatial Data Needs: The Future of the National Mapping Program REFERENCES AND NOTES 1. Michael Dertouzos (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), referenced in Peter J.Denning, “Massive Parallelism in the Future of Science” American Scientist, vol. 77, 1989, pp. 16–18. 2. Primary Mapping Economic Analysis: Phase I, September 1987, U.S. Geological Survey, 23 pp. plus addendum (33 pp. plus 25 pp. of tables). Primary Mapping Economic Analysis: Phase II, November 1988, U.S. Geological Survey, 31 pp. plus appendixes. 3. Proceedings of Federal Map Users Conference on National Topographic Program, U.S. Department of the Interior, October 5–6, 1964, Washington, D.C. 4. The Digital Spatial Data Industry Market Place, prepared for the USGS by International Data Corporation, January 10, 1983, Framingham, Mass. 5. “Reflections on the Revolution: The Transition from Analogue to Digital Representation of Space, 1958–1988,” The American Cartographer, vol. 15, No. 3, July 1988 (special issue, B.B.Petchenik, ed.), pp. 245–322. 6. R.Kling and W.Scacchi, “The Web of Computing: Computer Technology as Social Organization,” Advances in Computers, vol. 21, M.C.Yovitz, ed., Academic Press, New York, p. 6, 1982.

OCR for page 51
Spatial Data Needs: The Future of the National Mapping Program 7. R.W.Olson and G.Michael Callahan, “Digital Systems Development at the USGS,” Proceedings of the International Cartographic Association, Morelia, Mexico, 1987; see also U.S. Geological Yearbook-Fiscal Year 1986, 1987. 8. R.W.Marx, “The TIGER System: Automating the Geographic Structure of the United States Census,” Government Publications Review, vol. 13, 1986, pp. 181–201. 9. Donald Cooke, GDT News, vol. 5, no. 1, Spring 1989, p. 1. 10. C.Russell, “Roll on Mississippi,” American Demographics, June 1988, p. 2. 11. Department of Transportation, “Discussion Paper on Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems,” U.S. Department of Transportation, May 1989, p. 33. 12. NMD Marketing Plan for FY 1988, Office of Information and Data Services, National Mapping Division, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va. 13. J.Woods, “Strategic Data Initiative for a Vehicle Navigation and Digital Mapping Systems,” Proceedings, IEEE Vehicle Navigation and Information Systems Conference, Toronto, Canada, September 11–13, 1989, pp. 255–259. In this presentation, Woods “…call(s) upon the technical community to consider the needs and the potential benefits of aligning the commercial …and local government interests in a more complementing mission that will break out of the constraints of old.” 14. Summary of GIS Activities in the Federal Government, Reports Working Group, Federal Interagency Coordinating Committee on Digital Cartography, Washington, D.C., 1988, 45 pp. 15. Office of Technology Assessment, Technology and the American Economic Transition: Choices for the Future, OTA-TET-283, 1988, U.S. Congress, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 508 pp. 16. Peter J.Denning, “Massive Parallelism in the Future of Science,” American Scientist, vol. 77, 1989, pp. 16–18. 17. Nicholas R.Chrisman, “Challenges for Research in Geographic Information Systems,” International Geographic Information System Symposium, Association of American Geographers, Washington, D.C., 1989, vol. 1, pp. 1–101 to 1–118.