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Appendix
Biographical Sketches of Committee on Hydrologic Science

Dara Entekhabi (chairman) is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the basic understanding of coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems that may form the bases for enhanced hydrologic predictability. Specifically, he conducts research in land-atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, groundwater-surface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. He received his B.A and M.A. degrees from Clark University. Dr. Entekhabi received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mary P. Anderson is a professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her current research interests include the effects of potential global climate change on groundwater-lake systems and quantifying groundwater recharge. Dr. Anderson received a B.A. degree in geology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University. She is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board.

Roni Avissar is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and director of the Center for Environmental Prediction at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the study of land-atmosphere interactions from micro to global scales, including the development and use of a variety of atmospheric, land, and oceanic models. Dr. Avissar received his B.S. degree in soil and water science, his M.S. degree in micrometeorology, and his Ph.D. in mesoscale meteorology from the Hebrew University in Israel. He is the editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Climate and Physics of the Atmosphere.

Roger C. Bales is a professor in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources at the University of Arizona. Dr. Bales conducts research on the hydrology and biogeochemistry of alpine areas, polar snow and ice, and water quality. He received his B.S. degree from Purdue University, his M.S. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology.

Eville Gorham is a professor of ecology and botany at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular ecosystem acidification (both natural and anthro-



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Page 33 Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee on Hydrologic Science Dara Entekhabi (chairman) is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the basic understanding of coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems that may form the bases for enhanced hydrologic predictability. Specifically, he conducts research in land-atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, groundwater-surface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. He received his B.A and M.A. degrees from Clark University. Dr. Entekhabi received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mary P. Anderson is a professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her current research interests include the effects of potential global climate change on groundwater-lake systems and quantifying groundwater recharge. Dr. Anderson received a B.A. degree in geology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University. She is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Roni Avissar is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and director of the Center for Environmental Prediction at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the study of land-atmosphere interactions from micro to global scales, including the development and use of a variety of atmospheric, land, and oceanic models. Dr. Avissar received his B.S. degree in soil and water science, his M.S. degree in micrometeorology, and his Ph.D. in mesoscale meteorology from the Hebrew University in Israel. He is the editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Climate and Physics of the Atmosphere. Roger C. Bales is a professor in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources at the University of Arizona. Dr. Bales conducts research on the hydrology and biogeochemistry of alpine areas, polar snow and ice, and water quality. He received his B.S. degree from Purdue University, his M.S. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. Eville Gorham is a professor of ecology and botany at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular ecosystem acidification (both natural and anthro-

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Page 34 pogenic) and the role of northern peatlands in the global carbon cycle and their likely responses to climate warming. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia and his Ph.D. from the University of London. Dr. Gorham is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Water Science and Technology Board, and he has served on several NRC committees. Marc B. Parlange is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His primary research interest is in hydrology and fluid mechanics in the environment, especially questions of land-atmosphere interaction, turbulence and the atmospheric boundary layer, watershed-scale hydrology, and vadose zone transport processes. Dr. Parlange received his B.S. degree from Griffith University (Brisbane, Australia) and his M.S. degree in agricultural engineering and Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Cornell University. Christa Peters-Lidard is an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her primary research focuses on measurement and modeling of terrestrial water and energy balances and fluxes related to land-atmosphere interactions over a range of temporal and spatial scales. This research encompasses the areas of micrometeorology, boundary layer meteorology, field experiments, hillslope hydrology, hydrometeorology, numerical modeling, spatial data analysis, and remote sensing. She received her B.S. degree in geophysics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering and operations research from Princeton University. Kenneth W. Potter is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His teaching and research interests are in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and hydrologic restoration. Dr. Potter is a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has served on many of its committees. He received his B.S. degrees in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University. Eric F. Wood is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Water Resources Program, at Princeton University. His areas of interest include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land-atmospheric interaction, hydrologic impact of climate change, stochastic hydrology, hydrologic forecasting, and rainfall-runoff modeling. Dr. Wood is an associate editor for Reviews in Geophysics, Applied Mathematics and Computation: Modeling the Environment, and Journal of Forecasting. Dr. Wood received a Sc.D. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board, the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC), and BASC's Climate Research Committee.