APPENDIX C
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

ROBERT A. MOFFITT (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Economics and the Department of Population Dynamics at Johns Hopkins University. He is an affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and a senior associate and member of the External Advisory Committee for the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center on Poverty Research. Moffitt is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, the Population Association of America, and the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He has published extensively in his field, and is considered an expert in the areas of labor economics, econometrics, public economics, and population economics. He received his B.A. in economics from Rice University and his master's and Ph.D. in economics from Brown University.

JOHN L. ADAMS is a statistician and head of the Statistical Consulting Service of the Statistics Group at RAND. He also serves as an adjunct assistant professor in the School of Business at the University of Southern California. Previously, he was a statistician for the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs and a research associate for the Management Information Division at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include statistical computing, data analysis, experimental design, and forecasting. He is a member of the American Statistical Association and received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota.

CONSTANCE F. CITRO is a senior staff member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of



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Evaluating Welfare Reform: A Framework and Review of Current Work APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff ROBERT A. MOFFITT (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Economics and the Department of Population Dynamics at Johns Hopkins University. He is an affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and a senior associate and member of the External Advisory Committee for the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center on Poverty Research. Moffitt is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, the Population Association of America, and the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He has published extensively in his field, and is considered an expert in the areas of labor economics, econometrics, public economics, and population economics. He received his B.A. in economics from Rice University and his master's and Ph.D. in economics from Brown University. JOHN L. ADAMS is a statistician and head of the Statistical Consulting Service of the Statistics Group at RAND. He also serves as an adjunct assistant professor in the School of Business at the University of Southern California. Previously, he was a statistician for the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs and a research associate for the Management Information Division at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include statistical computing, data analysis, experimental design, and forecasting. He is a member of the American Statistical Association and received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota. CONSTANCE F. CITRO is a senior staff member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of

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Evaluating Welfare Reform: A Framework and Review of Current Work Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/ National Science Foundation research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous panels, including the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. THOMAS CORBETT is associate director of the Institute for Research on Poverty and an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Corbett has been involved at all levels of government in policy analysis and the development and evaluation of social welfare programs for more than 2 decades. His research activities have focused on program administration and implementation and on the historical evolution of welfare issues, policies, and strategies in the United States. He received his Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. JOHN L. CZAJKA is a senior sociologist at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Much of his research has focused on statistical uses of administrative records and the design and analysis of longitudinal data. He is a member of the American Statistical Association, the Population Association of America, and the Washington Statistical Society. Czajka received a B.A. degree in government from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. KATHRYN EDIN is an assistant professor of the Department of Sociology and the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining the university, she was assistant professor of the Department of Sociology and Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Her research interests include qualitative methods, public policy, and urban and community sociology. Edin is also an associate fellow of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University. IRWIN GARFINKEL is the Mitchell I. Ginsburg professor of contemporary urban problems at the Columbia University School of Social Work. Previous positions held include professor and director of the school of social work and research member and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is also an affiliate of the Institute for

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Evaluating Welfare Reform: A Framework and Review of Current Work Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a senior affiliate of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research. His research interests include social policy, child support, and Single-parent families, and he has published extensively in these fields. He received his Ph.D. in social work and economics from the University of Michigan. ROBERT M. GOERGE is Associate Director for Research Operations at the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, and he codirects the Multi-state Foster Care Data Archive. In addition, he holds a research associate appointment at the University of Chicago and is a research affiliate of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research. His research interest focuses on the experiences of children and families in the social service system. His recent and current work includes a study of the effect of teenage childbearing on child maltreatment and foster care, and an analysis of how children's need for human services is affected by welfare reform. His research has been based primarily on, large administrative data files from public human service agencies, and he recently coedited a report on the research uses of administrative data from the Joint Center for Poverty Research. He received a Ph.D. in social policy from the University of Chicago. ERIC A. HANUSHEK is professor of economics and of public policy, and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. He was formerly deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office and is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He previously held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy and governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. He is an associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research involves applied public finance and public policy analysis, with special emphasis on education issues. He has also investigated the determination of individual incomes and wages, retirement income security, housing policy, social experimentation, statistical methodology, and the economics of discrimination. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. V. JOSEPH HOTZ is a professor in the Departments of Economics and Policy Studies at UCLA. He is a national research associate of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research, and chaired the center's Advisory Panel for Research Uses of Administrative Data. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. His research focuses on the economics of the family, applied econometrics, and the evaluation of social programs. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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Evaluating Welfare Reform: A Framework and Review of Current Work RICHARD A. KULKA is Research Vice President of Statistics, Health, and Social Policy at the Research Triangle Institute. Prior to his current appointment, he was Senior Vice President for Survey Research at the National Opinion Research Center. He has been involved in the design, conduct, and analysis of numerous statistical surveys on health, mental health, and other social policy issues for more than 2 decades, while also conducting a broad range of applied research on survey research methods in these areas. Kulka is a member of several professional associations, including the American Statistical Association, the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and the American Public Health Association. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan. REBECCA A. MAYNARD is trustee professor of education and social policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her appointment, she served as senior vice president and director of research at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. While at Mathematica, she spent more than 18 years designing and evaluating education, employment, and welfare policies and programs. She is also an associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on welfare reform and to the U.S. General Accounting Office and the Rockefeller Foundation on various social welfare projects. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. SUZANNE M. RANDOLPH is an associate professor of family studies at the University of Maryland. In addition, she is coproject director of the Head Start Violence Prevention Project at the university, and a coprincipal investigator for a study of early child care at Temple University and the Johns Hopkins University study on the ecology of African American children's development. Her research interests include the normative development of African American infants, toddlers, and preschoolers and culturally responsive evaluation of community-based programs for African American families and other families of color. Randolph is a member of the Society for Research in Child Development and received her B.S. in psychology from Howard University and master's and Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan. WERNER SCHINK is chief of research for the California Department of Social Services, where he is responsible for California's extensive welfare reform demonstration projects. In addition, he oversees the evaluations that are being conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, Schink held positions as chief of California's $325 million Job Training Partnership Act program and chief economist for California's Employment Development Department. Schink is a member and past president of the National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics, an

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Evaluating Welfare Reform: A Framework and Review of Current Work organization comprised of researchers and statisticians from state and local social services agencies. He received an M.A. from the University of California, Davis. MICHELE VER PLOEG is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics and serves as study director for this panel. Her research interests include the effects of social policies on families and children, the outcomes of children who experience poverty and changes in family composition, and individuals' education attainment choices. She received a B.A. in economics from Central College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in consumer economics and housing from Cornell University.