Appendix F
Biographical Information

Charles R. O'Melia, Chair, is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and formerly served on the Water Science and Technology Board. His Professional experience includes positions at Hazen & Sawyer Engineers, University of Michigan, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, environmental fate and transport, predictive modeling of natural systems, and theory of water and wastewater treatment. He received a B.C.E. from Manhattan College and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan.

Max J. Pfeffer, Vice-Chair, is an associate professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at Cornell University. His research has focused on the social aspects of agriculture, the environment, and development planning. He has done recent work on the social dimensions of watershed planning within the New York City watershed and works on natural resource management in Central America. Dr. Pfeffer was a member of the NRC's Watershed Management Committee. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin in 1986.

Paul K. Barten is an associate professor of forest resources at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and lecturer in hydrology and watershed management at Yale University. Dr. Barten received his Ph.D. (1988) and M.S. (1985) in hydrology and watershed management from the University of Minnesota. A native of the Catskill Mountain region, he holds undergraduate degrees in forestry



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 545
Watershed Management for Potable Water Supply: Assessing the New York City Strategy Appendix F Biographical Information Charles R. O'Melia, Chair, is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and formerly served on the Water Science and Technology Board. His Professional experience includes positions at Hazen & Sawyer Engineers, University of Michigan, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, environmental fate and transport, predictive modeling of natural systems, and theory of water and wastewater treatment. He received a B.C.E. from Manhattan College and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan. Max J. Pfeffer, Vice-Chair, is an associate professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at Cornell University. His research has focused on the social aspects of agriculture, the environment, and development planning. He has done recent work on the social dimensions of watershed planning within the New York City watershed and works on natural resource management in Central America. Dr. Pfeffer was a member of the NRC's Watershed Management Committee. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin in 1986. Paul K. Barten is an associate professor of forest resources at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and lecturer in hydrology and watershed management at Yale University. Dr. Barten received his Ph.D. (1988) and M.S. (1985) in hydrology and watershed management from the University of Minnesota. A native of the Catskill Mountain region, he holds undergraduate degrees in forestry

OCR for page 545
Watershed Management for Potable Water Supply: Assessing the New York City Strategy from SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry (1983) and the New York State Ranger School (1977). His research focuses on hydrological processes and land use impacts on watersheds, forests, and wetlands. He is co-chair of the Quabbin (Boston water supply) Science and Technical Advisory Committee. G. Edward Dickey is a consultant to public and private organizations interested in water policy and infrastructure development and management. He also is adjunct professor of economics at Loyola College in Maryland. Dr. Dickey retired from federal service in 1998 after a career in water resources planning and project development. In his last position as Chief of the Planning Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he directed the Corps' nationwide water resources planning programs and its small project programs. In his prior positions as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army and Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), he provided leadership and policy direction for all army civil works activities including the Section 404 regulatory program. He received his B.A. in Political Economy from the Johns Hopkins University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Northwestern University. Margot W. Garcia received her Ph.D. in watershed management from the University of Arizona in 1980. She is an associate professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Virginia Commonwealth University, where she teaches courses in environmental planning and citizen participation. Previously, she worked for the U.S. Forest Service doing land use planning, computer modeling, and public involvement. Dr. Garcia was a member of the Steering Committee of Water Quality 2000, a coalition of 85 national organizations which proposed a national water policy; one of its main points was to call for a watershed approach to clean water. She has given invited talks and written policy papers on watershed management since 1989 and was a member of the NRC's Watershed Management Committee. Charles N. Haas earned a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois. He is the Betz Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering at Drexel University. He was formerly a professor and acting chair in the Department of Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology. His areas of research involve microbial and chemical risk assessment, hazardous waste processing, industrial wastewater treatment, waste recovery, and water and wastewater disinfection processes. Dr. Haas has chaired a number of professional conferences and workshops, has served as a member of several advisory panels to the Environmental Protection Agency, and is currently on an advisory committee to the Philadelphia Department of Health.

OCR for page 545
Watershed Management for Potable Water Supply: Assessing the New York City Strategy Richard G. Hunter is the Deputy State Health Officer with the Florida Department of Health in Tallahassee, Florida, where he is responsible for the day-to-day management of all public health programs. He has been involved with numerous issues relating to the impact of land use on the environment. These include long-term studies on the impacts of development on the near-shore waters of the Florida Keys, a research project relating to nutrient input from dairies and septic systems in the Suwannee River watershed, regulation of land disposal of wastewater treatment residuals, and a study of Giardia contamination of water wells by septic systems. Dr. Hunter received his Ph.D. in environmental health from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in 1988. R. Richard Lowrance is an ecologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. He received his Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia in 1981. His research involves analyzing and modeling the ability of buffer zones to protect surface water and groundwater from nonpoint source pollution derived from agriculture. Recently, he chaired a scientific panel for the Chesapeake Bay Program to evaluate the water quality functions of riparian forest buffer systems in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Dr. Lowrance served on the NRC Workshop on Monitoring and Managing Natural Resources for the Office of International Affairs in 1990. Christine L. Moe is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and an adjunct professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Emory University School of Public Health. She received her Ph.D. in environmental sciences and engineering from the University of North Carolina and has done extensive laboratory and field research on waterborne transmission of infectious agents and diagnosis and epidemiology of enteric virus infections. Dr. Moe served on the NRC Committee to Evaluate the Viability of Augmenting Potable Water Supplies with Reclaimed Water. Cynthia L. Paulson is a vice president and Central North Manager at Brown and Caldwell in Denver, Colorado. Her experience is in watershed and water quality planning and assessment, including the evaluation of point and nonpoint source pollutant impacts on receiving waters and performance of wasteload allocations. She receive her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Colorado in 1993. Dr. Paulson has served on the Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on U.S.G.S. Water Resources Research. Rutherford H. Platt is a professor of geography and planning law at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He received his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago and also holds a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. He served as assistant director and staff attorney for the Open Lands

OCR for page 545
Watershed Management for Potable Water Supply: Assessing the New York City Strategy Project, Inc., Chicago, and is a member of the Illinois bar. He has served on other NRC committees including the Committee on Flood Insurance Studies, the Committee on Water Resources Research Review, the Committee on a Levee Policy for the National Flood Insurance Program, and the Committee on Managing Coastal Erosion. He chaired the NRC Committees on Options to Preserve the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and Flood Control Alternatives in the American River Basin. Jerald L. Schnoor is a University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Environmental Engineering and co-directs the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research. A new member of the National Academy of Engineering, he received his Ph.D. in environmental health engineering from the University of Texas. His research interests are in mathematical modeling of water quality, aquatic chemistry, and impact of carbon emissions on global change. He has research projects in aquatic effects modeling of acid precipitation, global change and biogeochemistry, groundwater and hazardous wastes, and exposure risk assessment modeling. He is the editor of four books and the author of Environmental Modeling. Dr. Schnoor is also the associate editor of Environmental Science & Technology. Thomas R. Schueler is the executive director of the Center for Watershed Protection, a nonprofit organization devoted to the protection, restoration, and stewardship of the nation's watersheds. As Chief of the Anacostia Restoration Team at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, he directed the restoration of the Anacostia watershed. Over the past 15 years, he has pioneered new designs for stormwater ponds, wetlands, and filtering systems, developed new methods for urban watershed planning, demonstrated new techniques for stream restoration, sediment control, riparian reforestation, and stormwater retrofits, and developed new approaches to use impervious cover as a management tool for watershed planning. He received his B.S. in environmental science from the George Washington University. James M. Symons, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is presently retired and holds the position of the Cullen Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at the University of Houston. His primary research focus was disinfection of drinking water, specializing in the formation of disinfection byproducts. Other areas of research included source water control, treatment for removal of organic, inorganic, and particulate contaminants, and distributed water quality. His career includes 20 years in the federal government, the U.S. Public Health Service and the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Symons received his B.C.E. in Civil Engineering from Cornell University in 1954, and the S.M. and Sc.D. degrees in Sanitary Engineering from MIT in 1955 and 1957.

OCR for page 545
Watershed Management for Potable Water Supply: Assessing the New York City Strategy Robert G. Wetzel is the Bishop Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. His research interests include the physiology and ecology of bacteria, algae, and higher aquatic plants; biogeochemical cycling in fresh waters; and functional roles of organic compounds and detritus in aquatic ecosystems. His prior professional experience includes positions as professor at Michigan State University, Erlander National Professor of the Institute of Limnology of Uppsala University in Sweden, and professor at the University of Michigan. Dr. Wetzel is an elected member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He earned a B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis. STAFF Laura J. Ehlers is a senior staff officer of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and the study director for this report. She is also the study director for the WSTB Committee on Environmental Remediation at Naval Facilities, the Committee on Riparian Zone Functioning, and the Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediment. Dr. Ehlers received her B.S. in biology and engineering and applied science from the California Institute of Technology, and her M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. Ellen A. De Guzman is a senior project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She received a B.A. from the University of the Philippines and is currently majoring in economics from the University of Maryland University College. Her previous NRC reports include Valuing Groundwater, Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup, Issues in Potable Reuse, Improving the American River Flood Frequency Analyses, and New Directions in Water Resources Planning for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.