Appendixes



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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields Appendixes

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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields This page in the original is blank.

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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members John J. Wise, chair, retired in 1997 as vice president of research after 44 years with the Mobil Research and Development Corporation. Appointed to that position in 1987, Dr. Wise oversaw all of Mobil’s research and development in support of the exploration, production, refining, and marketing of petroleum. He was also a director of Mobil Solar Energy Corporation and the Mobil Foundation, and he has authored 20 technical publications and 28 U.S. patents. Dr. Wise served on the Board of Directors of the Industrial Research Institute and received its gold medal for achievement in R&D management. He has worked on several university advisory boards, among them the advisory board of the Center for Advanced Materials at the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a member of a United Nations panel studying global climate change. Wise has just completed his three-year term as co-chair of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts University (1953) and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965). Martin Blume, a former deputy director at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is currently editor-in-chief of the American Physical Society, on leave from his position as senior physicist at Brookhaven. His research interests include theoretical solid state physics, the theory of magnetism, slow neutron scattering, and synchrotron radiation. Before serving as Brookhaven’s deputy director, Dr. Blume chaired the National Synchrotron Light Source Department there. Dr. Blume has also served on a number of NRC committees, most recently on the Space Studies Board’s Task Group on Alternative Organizations. He received an A.B. from

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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields Princeton University (1954) and a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University (1959). Paul A. Fleury is the dean of the School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque. Before arriving at UNM, he spent more than 20 years at AT&T Bell Labs, where he headed the physics department, then became director of materials and process research in 1993. Earlier Dr. Fleury was vice president for research at Sandia National Laboratories. His major research interest has been the microscopic origin of physical phenomena in condensed matter systems, with emphasis on collective behaviors underlying the magnetic, optical, electronic, acoustic, and structural properties of materials. Dr. Fleury received a B.S. (1960) and an M.S. (1962) from John Carroll University and a Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965). He is a member of the Secretary of Energy’s Laboratory Operations Board, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Sciences. Jonathan Greer is a senior project leader at Abbott Laboratories in Illinois. Dr. Greer, whose research area is structural biology, served on the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee’s Panel on Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science (a.k.a. the Birgeneau report), which in January 1998 presented its review to the director of the Office of Energy Research at DOE. Donald U. Gubser has been the superintendent of the materials science and technology division at the Naval Research Laboratory since 1987. He serves as a member of many external advisory boards related to condensed matter physics, and he has been the organizer and co-chair of several international conferences. While at NRL (since 1969), Dr. Gubser has been a visiting scientist at the National Science Foundation and an adjunct professor at several universities. His principal research interests include superconductivity, magnetism, solid state physics, and materials science. He received a B.S. (1963), an M.S. (1964), and a Ph.D. (1969) in physics from the University of Illinois. Richard L. Harlow is an x-ray crystallographer who since 1977 has been a principal investigator for E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company. Among his other activities, Dr. Harlow represents DuPont as a board member on the Dow-Northwestern-DuPont Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source. This DND-CAT performs experiments in catalysis, polymer processing, and structural analysis. Dr. Harlow has also been an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware since 1981. He received a B.S. from Union College (1964), an M.S. from the University of Illinois (1966), and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Syracuse University (1971). Dr. Harlow has carried out research at all of the national synchrotron x-ray sources (NSLS, APS, SSRL, CHESS) and all the major neutron facilities (HFBR, HFIR, IPNS, LANSCE).

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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields Wayne A. Hendrickson is a biologist with more than 20 years’ experience in linking biochemical research with synchrotron sources. He is a leading crystallographer, recently heading a team that determined the detailed structure of the protein that HIV uses to infect T-lymphocyte immune cells. Dr. Hendrickson heads a laboratory at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Columbia University. He received a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin at River Falls (1963) and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Johns Hopkins University (1968). Joseph Hezir is currently a cofounder and the managing partner of EOP Group, Inc., which specializes in regulatory strategy development and problem solving and in identifying newly created government business opportunities formed from mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, and new markets. He is a member of the Critical Technologies Sub-Council of the Competitiveness Policy Council. Dr. Hezir served for 18 years in the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as an examiner in the environment branch, a senior analyst on government-wide management, and a budget examiner for energy technology programs. From 1986 to 1992, he was OMB deputy associate director for energy and science. He received his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering and completed graduate studies in urban and public affairs at Carnegie Mellon University, specializing in environmental and energy policy. J. David Litster is a condensed-matter physicist who is currently vice president for research and dean for graduate education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was appointed to the faculty at MIT in 1966 and became professor of physics in 1975. Dr. Litster’s research interests have focused on the experimental study of phase transitions in unusual states of matter, using primarily light scattering and high-resolution x-ray scattering. He is a former chair of the NRC ’s Solid State Sciences Committee (1993-1995). Dr. Litster is a former director of the MIT Center for Materials Science and Engineering and the Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory at MIT. He received a bachelor’s degree in engineering from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and a Ph.D. in physics from MIT. Lee J. Magid, a professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, also served as vice president for research and graduate studies at the University of Kentucky (1991-1994). In her research she studies the structure and dynamics of organized assemblies by means of (among other techniques) small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectivity. Dr. Magid has held several short-term research appointments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ETH-Zurich, and the Max Planck Institute in Göttingen. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Magid received a B.A. from Rice University (1969) and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (1973).

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COOPERATIVE STEWARDSHIP: Managing the Nation’s Multidisciplinary User Facilities for Research with Synchrotron Radiation, Neutrons, and High Magnetic Fields Peter B. Moore, a biophysicist and biochemist at Yale University, has experience with all three experimental media considered in this study: neutrons, synchrotrons, and magnetic fields. Dr. Moore has pioneered the development of novel biophysical approaches for obtaining structural information on macromolecules and their assemblies. His neutron scattering analyses of the ribosome and NMR structure determination of ribosomal RNA fragments have enlightened biological understanding of structure-function relationships in RNA machines. He received a B.S. from Yale University (1961) and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Harvard University (1966). Dagmar Ringe is a professor of biochemistry and chemistry at Brandeis University. Her research group studies the relationship of protein three-dimensional structure to chemical function, using a combination of design of transition-state analog inhibitors, site-directed mutagenesis, and x-ray crystallography. Dr. Ringe received a Ph.D. from Boston University. Cyrus R. Safinya is a professor of materials and physics and an affiliated faculty member of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Before joining the UCSB faculty, he was senior staff physicist and project leader for x-ray scattering at the Exxon Research and Engineering Company, where he worked on the structure of liquid crystals, complex fluids, and biological membranes. Dr. Safinya’s work emphasizes characterization of new structures and intermolecular interactions in self-assembled liquid crystalline and biological systems via modern synchrotron x-ray techniques of high-resolution and small-angle x-ray scattering. He initiated and chaired the first Gordon Research Conference on Complex Fluids (1990) and co-chaired the first Materials Research Society Meeting on Macromolecular Liquids (1989). Dr. Safinya received one of the two Rothschild fellowships awarded annually by the Curie Institute in Paris in 1994. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (1994) and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1997). He received a B.S. in mathematics and physics from Bates College (1975) and a Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1981).