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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

Thomas S. Hartwick (chair) is retired manager of the satellite payload program and system design at TRW and an expert in the manufacture and deployment of complex defense and surveillance systems. Dr. Hartwick has several years of experience as manager of various organizations in the aerospace industry at Hughes Aircraft Company and Aerospace Corporation. His areas of research include sensors and imaging, especially optical communications, far-infrared lasers and their applications, and laser heterodyne radiometry. Since leaving the aerospace industry in 1995, Dr. Hartwick has served on a number of academic, government, and industrial boards as a technical manager. He also served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Optical Science and Engineering.

Robert Berkebile is a consultant on air carrier operations with 41 years of experience. His area of expertise is in the coordination of cargo and passenger baggage. Before his retirement, Mr. Berkebile was manager of customer services automation for US Airways and director of station services for US-Africa Airways. He was a member of the NRC Panel on the Assessment of the Practicality of Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy for Aviation Security, under the Committee on Commercial Aviation Security.

Homer Boynton has extensive experience in security matters, including 25 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and 12 years with American Airlines as managing director of corporate security. He has chaired many advisory panels on airline security, including the Security Advisory Committee of the Air Transport Association and the Security Committee of the International Air Transport Association and was a member of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee. Mr. Boynton is a member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security.

Barry D. Crane of the Institute for Defense Analyses has a broad background in developing test and evaluation procedures for military hardware. He was responsible for developing drug-detection technology for the director of defense research and engineering, U.S. Department of Defense, until 1991. He is currently evaluating detection and monitoring capabilities of U.S. government surveillance assets used to find and follow air and maritime drug traffickers. He is also responsible for the evaluation of tactical aircraft testing for the director of operational test and evaluation, Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Crane is a member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security.

Colin Drury is professor of industrial engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo and executive director of the Center for Industrial Effectiveness, where he has worked extensively on the integration of ergonomics/human factors into company operations to increase competitiveness and job growth. Since 1990, Dr. Drury has headed a team applying human factors to the inspection and maintenance of civil aircraft. He conducted a study for the Air Transport Association evaluating the FAA's modular bomb set and the use of this bomb set in training and testing security screeners. Dr. Drury is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and the Ergonomics Society. In 1981, he was awarded the Bartlett Medal by the Ergonomics Society and in 1992 the Paul Fitts Award by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Dr. Drury has served on several NRC committees and panels.

Len Limmer retired in January 1998, closing a distinguished 26-year career with the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board, a local government agency responsible for the administration, management, and operation of the world's second busiest airport. He has cross-functional experience in public safety, including security police, counterterrorism,



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Page 67 Biographical Sketches of Panel Members Thomas S. Hartwick (chair) is retired manager of the satellite payload program and system design at TRW and an expert in the manufacture and deployment of complex defense and surveillance systems. Dr. Hartwick has several years of experience as manager of various organizations in the aerospace industry at Hughes Aircraft Company and Aerospace Corporation. His areas of research include sensors and imaging, especially optical communications, far-infrared lasers and their applications, and laser heterodyne radiometry. Since leaving the aerospace industry in 1995, Dr. Hartwick has served on a number of academic, government, and industrial boards as a technical manager. He also served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Optical Science and Engineering. Robert Berkebile is a consultant on air carrier operations with 41 years of experience. His area of expertise is in the coordination of cargo and passenger baggage. Before his retirement, Mr. Berkebile was manager of customer services automation for US Airways and director of station services for US-Africa Airways. He was a member of the NRC Panel on the Assessment of the Practicality of Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy for Aviation Security, under the Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. Homer Boynton has extensive experience in security matters, including 25 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and 12 years with American Airlines as managing director of corporate security. He has chaired many advisory panels on airline security, including the Security Advisory Committee of the Air Transport Association and the Security Committee of the International Air Transport Association and was a member of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee. Mr. Boynton is a member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. Barry D. Crane of the Institute for Defense Analyses has a broad background in developing test and evaluation procedures for military hardware. He was responsible for developing drug-detection technology for the director of defense research and engineering, U.S. Department of Defense, until 1991. He is currently evaluating detection and monitoring capabilities of U.S. government surveillance assets used to find and follow air and maritime drug traffickers. He is also responsible for the evaluation of tactical aircraft testing for the director of operational test and evaluation, Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Crane is a member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. Colin Drury is professor of industrial engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo and executive director of the Center for Industrial Effectiveness, where he has worked extensively on the integration of ergonomics/human factors into company operations to increase competitiveness and job growth. Since 1990, Dr. Drury has headed a team applying human factors to the inspection and maintenance of civil aircraft. He conducted a study for the Air Transport Association evaluating the FAA's modular bomb set and the use of this bomb set in training and testing security screeners. Dr. Drury is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and the Ergonomics Society. In 1981, he was awarded the Bartlett Medal by the Ergonomics Society and in 1992 the Paul Fitts Award by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Dr. Drury has served on several NRC committees and panels. Len Limmer retired in January 1998, closing a distinguished 26-year career with the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board, a local government agency responsible for the administration, management, and operation of the world's second busiest airport. He has cross-functional experience in public safety, including security police, counterterrorism,

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Page 68 explosives detection/disposal, crash rescue, and structural fire and hazardous-materials remediation. He is an officer of numerous Texas and national associations concerned with public safety in large metropolitan areas. Harry E. Martz is leader of the nondestructive evaluation research and development thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL). For six years, he led the computed-tomography project at LLNL, applying computed-tomography and x-ray and proton radiography to material characterization and gamma-ray gauge techniques to treaty verification activities. His current projects include the use of nonintrusive x-ray and gamma-ray computed-tomography techniques as three-dimensional imaging tools to understand material properties and analyze radioactive waste forms. He has applied these techniques to the inspection of automobile and aircraft parts, reactor fuel tubes, high explosives, shaped charges, and the contents of waste drums. His research has focused on the design and construction of scanners and preprocessing, image reconstruction, and analysis algorithms. Dr. Martz chaired the NRC Panel on Configuration Management and Performance Verification of Explosives-Detection Systems and was a member of the Panel on Airport Passenger Screening and the Panel on the Assessment of the Practicality of Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy for Aviation Security. He is currently a member of the Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. Joseph A. Navarro is president of JAN Associates. He has extensive experience in testing explosives-detection equipment in the laboratory and in the statistical analysis of test data. Dr. Navarro was instrumental in the development of the explosives-detection system testing protocol used for FAA certification tests and has been a technical advisor to several NRC committees and panels on aviation security. Eric R. Schwartz is corporate vice president of quality at The Boeing Company and has participated in many studies of safety and survivability for commercial aircraft. Mr. Schwartz performed investigations and managed engineering analyses of structural failures due to terrorist bombings on Pan Am 747, UTA Airlines DC-10, and Itavia DC-9 aircraft and has developed research proposals for advanced aircraft structures. He is a recognized expert on terrorist acts against commercial aviation and has presented numerous technical papers to the FAA, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the U.S. Department of Defense, and international aviation authorities. Elizabeth H. Slate is an associate professor in the School of Operations Research and Industrial Engineering, Cornell University. She has conducted extensive research into statistical analysis methodologies related to industrial engineering issues. She was awared a recent grant from the Semiconductor Research Corporation/National Science Foundation for a study of methods for modeling stochastic processes in semiconductor manufacturing. Dr. Slate is active in the American Statistical Association and many other societies and is the chair elect of the American Statistical Association Subsection on Statistical Computing. Michael Story has been involved in the research, design, and commercialization of mass spectrometers for 30 years. He is a cofounder of the Finnigan Corporation and is currently technology assistant to the president of Thermo Quest Corporation. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security (1988–1993) and chaired the Panel on Test Protocol and Performance Criteria. Mr. Story also served on the NRC Panel on Configuration Management and Performance Verification of Explosives-Detection Systems.

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