Appendix D
State Licensure Laws for the Practice of Dietetics (as of June 1999)

STATUTORY DEFINITIONS

  • Licensing statutes explicitly define the scope and requirements of professional practice. It is illegal to practice a regulated profession without first obtaining a license from the state.

  • Statutory certification limits the use of particular professional titles to persons meeting predetermined requirements, but persons not certified can still practice the profession.

  • Registration is the least restrictive form of state regulation. In California (the only state where this statutory category is currently used), registration is an entitlement law that prohibits use of the title “dietitian” by persons not meeting state-mandated qualifications. However, unregistered persons may practice the profession. Typically, exams are not given and enforcement of the registration requirement is minimal.

PROFESSIONAL REGULATION: STATE UPDATE

Alabama (1989)1—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists

Arkansas (1989)—licensing of dietitians

California (1995)1—registration of dietitians

Connecticut (1994)—certification of dietitians

Delaware (1994)—certification of dietitian-nutritionists

District of Columbia (1986)—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists

Florida (1988)—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists and nutrition counselors



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OCR for page 340
The Role of Nutrition in Maintaining Health in the Nation’s Elderly: Evaluating Coverage of Nutrition Services for the Medicare Population Appendix D State Licensure Laws for the Practice of Dietetics (as of June 1999) STATUTORY DEFINITIONS Licensing statutes explicitly define the scope and requirements of professional practice. It is illegal to practice a regulated profession without first obtaining a license from the state. Statutory certification limits the use of particular professional titles to persons meeting predetermined requirements, but persons not certified can still practice the profession. Registration is the least restrictive form of state regulation. In California (the only state where this statutory category is currently used), registration is an entitlement law that prohibits use of the title “dietitian” by persons not meeting state-mandated qualifications. However, unregistered persons may practice the profession. Typically, exams are not given and enforcement of the registration requirement is minimal. PROFESSIONAL REGULATION: STATE UPDATE Alabama (1989)1—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists Arkansas (1989)—licensing of dietitians California (1995)1—registration of dietitians Connecticut (1994)—certification of dietitians Delaware (1994)—certification of dietitian-nutritionists District of Columbia (1986)—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists Florida (1988)—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists and nutrition counselors

OCR for page 340
The Role of Nutrition in Maintaining Health in the Nation’s Elderly: Evaluating Coverage of Nutrition Services for the Medicare Population Georgia (1994)1—licensing of dietitians Idaho (1994)—licensing of dietitians Illinois (1990)—licensing of dietitians and nutrition counselors Indiana (1994)—certification of dietitians Iowa (1985)—licensing of dietitians Kansas (1989)1—licensing of dietitians Kentucky (1994)1—licensing of dietitians and certification of nutritionists Louisiana (1987)1—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists Maine (1994)1—licensing of dietitians and dietetic technicians Maryland (1994)1—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists Minnesota (1994)—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists Mississippi (1994)1—licensing of dietitians and protection of nutritionist title Montana (1987)1—licensing of nutritionists and protection of dietitian title Nebraska (1995)1—licensing of medical nutrition therapist Nevada (1995)—certification2 of dietitians New Mexico (1997)1—licensing of dietitians, nutritionists, and nutrition associates New York (199l)—certification of dietitians and nutritionists North Carolina (199l)—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists North Dakota (1989)1—licensing of dietitians and certification2 of nutritionists Ohio (1986)—licensing of dietitians Oklahoma (1984)—licensing of dietitians Oregon (1989)—certification2 of dietitians Puerto Rico (1974)1—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists Rhode Island (l991)1—licensing of dietitians and nutritionists South Dakota (1996)—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists Tennessee (1987)—licensing of dietitian-nutritionists Texas (1993)1—certification2 of dietitians Utah (1996)1—certification of dietitians Vermont (1993)—certification of dietitians Virginia (1995)—certification2 of dietitians and nutritionists Washington (1988)—certification of dietitians and nutritionists West Virginia (1996)—licensing of dietitians Wisconsin (1994)—certification of dietitians SOURCE: Reproduced with permission from the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1997. Update on state licensure laws and ADA regulatory remarks. J Am Diet Assoc 97:1251. 1   Year amended or authorized. 2   These laws provide the certified practitioner with a license and are termed “voluntary licensing” laws.