Click for next page ( 190


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 189
,`~.~.~.r ''in Biographical Information on Convocation arc! Action Conference Speakers Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences in Wash- ington, D.C., is a respected biochemist recognized for his work both in bio- chemistry and molecular biology. He is noted particularly for his extensive study of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be replicated, as required for a living cell to divide. He has spent his career making significant contributions to the field of life sciences, serving in different capaci- ties on a number of prestigious advisory and editorial boards, including as chair of the Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council. Until his election as President of the Academy, he was President-Elect of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Born in 1938 in Chicago, Illinois, Alberts graduated from Harvard Col- lege in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with a degree in biochemical sciences. He earned a doctorate from Harvard University in 1965. He joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1966 and after ten years was appointed professor and vice chair of the Depart- ment of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Fran- cisco (UCSF). In 1980, he was awarded the honor of an American Cancer Society Lifetime Research Professor- ship. In 1985, he was named chair of the UCSF Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Alberts has long been committed to the improvement of science education, dedicating much of his time to educa- tional projects such as City Science, a program seeking to improve science teaching in San Francisco elementary schools. He has served on the advisory boar(1 of the National Science Re- sources Center a joint project of the National Academy of Sciences and the Smithsonian Institution working with teachers, scientists, and school systems to improve teaching of science as well as on the National Academy of Sciences' National Committee on Science E(luca- tion Stan(lar(ls anti Assessment. He is a principal author of Me Mo

OCR for page 189
lecular Biology of the Cell, considered the leading textbook of its kind and used widely in U.S. colleges and univer- sities. His most recent text,Essential Cell Biology (1997), is inten(le(1 to approach this subject matter for a wider audience. Deborah Loewenberg Ball is professor of educational studies at the University of Michigan. Her work as a researcher and teacher educator draws directly and indirectly on her long experience as an elementary classroom teacher. With mathematics as the main context for the work, Ball studies the practice of teaching and the processes of learning to teach. Her work also examines efforts to improve teaching through policy, reform initiatives, and teacher education. Ball's publications include articles on teacher learning and teacher education; the role of subject matter knowledge in teaching and learning to teach; endemic chal- lenges of teaching; and the relations of policy and practice in instructional reform. Hyman Bass is the Adrian Professor of Mathematics at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1959. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from Princeton. His research is mainly in algebra-group theory, K-theory, number theory, anti APPE N AX 2 algebraic geometry. Dr. Bass received the Van Amringe Prize for his book, Algebraic K-theory, the Cole Prize in algebra from the American Mathemati- cal Society, and was a Phi Beta Kappa National Visiting Scholar. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He currently chairs the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the National Re search Council. Bass is a member of the Program Steering Committee for this Convocation. Catherine Brown is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curricu- lum and Instruction at Indiana Univer- sity. She has an extensive background in teacher professional development, elementary and secondary mathematics pedagogy, anti instruction in mathemat- ics education at the middle school, high school, and university levels. She is a member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Mathematical Association of America, anti the Ameri- can E(lucational Research Association. Brown received her (1octor of education in mathematics education from the University of Georgia in 1985 and has been a reviewer and author for numerous mathematics education journals. Brown is a member of the Program Steering Committee for this Convocation.

OCR for page 189
Sam Chattin is a science teacher at William H. English Middle School in Scottsberg, Indiana. He has expertise in middle level teaching and learning, having taught at the middle school level for more than twenty years. He is a member of the National Middle School Association, the National Association of Biology Teachers, and served on the Board of the National Science Teachers Association. Chattin has received several awards for his work the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching, the Kohl Interna- tional Teaching Award, the Walt Disney Salute to the American Teacher, the Lifetime Cable Award, along with several others. Chattin is a member of the Program Steering Committee for this Convocation. Tom Dickinson attended Wake Forest University where he received his B.A. in history in 1969. He taught social stud- ies to both middle school and high school students for seven years and he earne(1 his M.E(1. in social studies education from the University of Vir- ginia in Charlottesville. In 197S, Dickinson worked on his doctoral (legree full time, graduating in 1980 with a Ed.D. in social studies education and a ~ minor In supervision of Instruction. Dickinson worked at the college level for the majority of the last nineteen years at North Carolina Wesleyan CONVOCATION BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS College, Eastern Illinois University, Georgia Southern College dater Univer- sity), and is currently a professor of curriculum and instruction at In(liana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. His primary teaching, writing and research concerns deal with middle school education, specifically middle school teacher education. He served as editor of the Middle School Journal for the National Middle School Association and authored or edited a number of books on middle school education. In addition he wrote, with C. Kenneth McEwin in 1996, a background paper for the Middle Grade School State Policy Initiative (MGSSPI) of the Carnegie Corporation title(1 Forgotten youth, forgotten teachers: Transformation of the professional preparation of teachers of young Adolescents. Dickinson is a member of the Profes- sional Preparation anti Certification Committee of the National Middle School Association, a stan(ling commit- tee that is charge(1 with oversight of the NCATE review process for middle school teacher education. He has also serve(1 as a Boar(1 of Examiner for NCATE and a member of the Steering Committee of the 1994 National Assess- ment of Education Progress (NAEP) U.S. History Consensus Project. Dickinson has written a number of grants in the last five years that were

OCR for page 189
aimed at the development of middle school and high school performance- based teacher education programs and K-12 teacher creativity staff develop- ment workshops. His research interests include middle school teacher education and the origins of the middle school movement. Nancy DocIa is a President and founder of Teacher to Teacher, a con- sulting firm for middle level education. She began her career as a middle school teacher and since then has continued to act as a teacher advocate and helper in both her writings and presentations. Doda has a Ph.D. from University of Florida, in Middle School Curriculum and Instruction. She has been a Team Leader on an Interdisciplinary Team; Teacher-Advisor in Advisor-Advisee Program, has authored a regular col- umn for teachers for four years called 'Teacher to Teacher" in the Middle School Journal; now a monograph called Teacher to Teacher. Since 1976, when she began consulting work during the summers, to a full-time job as a teacher helper to(lay, she has worke(1 with mi(l(lle level teachers, administrators, and parents in over forty states, Canada, Europe, anti the Far East. She was a featured guest on the NBC Today Show in 1988. Doda has co-authored Team Organization: Promise Practices and Possibilities with Dr. Tom Erb for NEA, APPE N AX 2 authored many articles, and recently wrote for Instructor on the subject of homebase called, 'who's Afraid of Homebase"? Middle Years, 1991. Doda was the first teacher to keynote the National Middle School Association's annual conference in 1977 anti has keynoted that conference on two addi- tional occasions. She has serve(1 on the Boar(1 of Directors of the National Middle School Association for five years. Robert FeIner is currently Chair of the Department of Education and Director of the National Center on Public Education anti Social Policy at the University of Rho(le Islan(l. The Center's central focus is on (leveloping and implementing more effective models through which universities can partner with K-12 public education to ensure academic success anti positive evelopmental outcomes for all stu- (lents. In this work, the Center partners with schools anti local communities, local anti state agencies, anti other branches of government to enhance their joint capacity to a(l(lress pressing e(lucational, social, health anti economic issues and to improve the lives of all children, youth, anti families through collaborative efforts. Previously, at the University of Illinois, he was Professor of Public Policy, Education, anti Social Welfare,

OCR for page 189
and the Professor of Psychology and Director of the Graduate Programs in Clinical and Community Psychology. While at Illinois he served as founding Director of the Center for Prevention Research and Development where the Center worked to develop more sys- tematic applications of land-grant university traditions to the lives of the residents of Illinois and the nation. In 1990 he was appointed by the Univer- sity of Illinois to the "Irving B. Harris Professorship" a faculty position for interdisciplinary scholarship in social policy and education. He was the founding president of the Board of Directors of the Martin Luther King Community Services of Illinois Founda- tion, an organization that focuses on the needs of economically disadvan- taged children and families. FeIner has also served as Director of the Graduate Programs in Clinical and Community Psychology at Auburn University, and before that as Assistant Professor of Clinical/Community Psychology at Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. in Clinical/Community Psychology at the University of Rochester. He serves or has served on the editorial boards of nearly a dozen scientific journals and as a member of more than two dozen federal and foun- dation research and demonstration advisory and grant review panels. He is a fellow of the American Psychological CONVOCATION BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS Association, the American Psychological Society, and the American Orthopsychi- atric Association. In recognition of his work in the prevention field he received the Administrator's Award from the U.S. Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration and, in 1988 his work on educational reform as preven- tion was selected by the American Psychological Association as one of fourteen "Exemplary" Prevention Programs in the United States. He is the author of over 150 papers, articles, chapters, and volumes. A primary focus of his work is on understanding and guiding local, statewide, anti national policy and reform efforts to transform elementary, middle level, and secondary education. Of particular concern are the needs of students and families from economically and socially disadvantaged backgrounds, anti the preparation of youth and families to participate in the workforce and democracy of the 2ist Century. This work has involve(1 over i,000 schools and partnerships across more than 22 states and has been fun(le(1 by the Carnegie Corporation, the Lilly Endowment, the Kellogg Foundation , an (1 the Kauffman an (1 Danforth Foundations, several states anti large school (listricts. A secon(1 major focus of his work has been on the reform anti evaluation of social anti health policy anti programs that a(l(lress welfare (lepen(lence,

OCR for page 189
mental health, substance abuse, and improving the developmental, educa- tional, and vocational outcomes of children, youth, and families. Linda Cooper Foreman has been a high school and middle school cIass- room teacher for twenty-three years. For the past eleven years, she has also worked as Curriculum Specialist for The Mathematics Learning Center (MEC) at Portland State University, Portland, Oregon. At MEC, she works exten sively with teachers and teacher leaders from across the nation, supporting the implementation of mathematics reform. She is currently co-authoring an NSF supported comprehensive mathematics curriculum for grades 5-S, Mathematics Alive! Courses I-IV (the first 2 courses were originally published as Visual Mathematics). Foreman is a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics Teaching. Stephen 0. Gibson is the Principal at Patapsco Middle School in Ellicott City, Maryland. He has been the principal at this middle school for the past nine years. Katherine Hart has recently retired from the Chair of Mathematics Educa- tion at the University of Nottingham. She was director of the Shell Centre. Hart started her career as a mathemat APPE N DO 2 ics teacher in England, the U.S., and Bermuda. Shewasthenateacher- trainer for ten years with a year as a UNESCO fiel(1 officer in Bangkok, Thailand. After obtaining an Ed.D. at the University of Indiana she did re- search at London University for ten years, producing books for teachers on the research projects: Concepts in Secondary Mathematics anti Science (CSMS), Strategies anti Errors in Secondary Mathematics (SESM), and Chil(lren's Mathematical Frameworks (CMF). She was an inspector of schools (HMp for two years and then became director of a curriculum development project before (Erecting the Shell Centre for the last five years. Hart was president of the British Society for Research in Learning Math- ematics, Psychology of Mathematics Education Workshop and the Interna- tional Group Psychology of Mathemat- ics Education. She has worked in many third-worId countries and is currently committed to working in Kwazulu, Natal in South Africa anti Sri Lanka. Glenda Pappas is a University Distin- guishe(1 Professor at the Department of Mathematics at Michigan State Univer- sity. She receive(1 her E(1.D. in Math- ematics anti Education, with (listinction, from the University of Georgia in 1965. She has been a member of the Depart

OCR for page 189
ment of Mathematics faculty at MSU since she received her degree. From 1989-91 she was on leave to serve as the Program Director for Teacher Prepara- tion at the National Science Foundation. Her research and development interests are in the connected areas of students' learning of mathematics and mathemat- ics teacher change at the middle and secondary levels. She is the Co-Director of the Connected Mathematics Project, which is funded by the National Science Foundation to develop a complete middle school curriculum for teachers and for students. She served as the Chair of the middle school writing group for the National Council of Teachers of Math ematics' (NORM) Ca~rric?~?`m and Evaluation Standards for School Math- ematics, and as Chair of the Commission that developed the NORM Professional Standardsfor Teaching Mathematics. She served on the NCEM Board of Directors from 1989 to 1992 and is currently serving on the Board through 2001. Lappan was a member of the National Advisory Boards of the following: Glenn T. Seaborg Center for Teaching and Learning Science and Mathematics, the Ford Foundation/University of Pitts- burgh QUASAR project, the NSF/ University of Maryland Teacher Prepa- ration Collaborative, the NSF/San Diego State University Mathematics for Elementary Teacher Preparation Mate CONVOCATION BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS rials Development Project, the Univer- sity of Chicago School Mathematics Project, the NSF/University of Wiscon- sin Cognitively Guided Instruction Project and many others. In 1993 she received a Distinguished Faculty Award from Michigan State University and the Michigan Council of Teachers of Math- ematics Service Award for 1993. She served as Vice-Chair of the Mathemati- cal Sciences Education Board for five years and continues as a member of MSEB. In 1995 she was appointed by the Secretary of Education to the National Education Research Policy and Priorities Board. In 1996 she received the Association of Women in Mathemat- ics Louise Hay Award for outstanding contributions to Mathematics Educa- tion. In 1997 she receive(1 a Meritorious Faculty Awar(1 for the College of Natural Science Alumni. In 1998 she was named University Distinguished Professor at MSU. She is currently the President of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Cyril Kent McGuire is the assistant secretary for the Office of E(lucational Research and Improvement at the U.S. Department of Education. He was nominate(1 by President Clinton in October 1997 and confirmed by the Senate in May 1998. This office fun(ls research anti (demonstration projects to improve education , an (1 collects an (1

OCR for page 189
disseminates statistical information on the condition of education. McGuire, of Moorestown, NT, joined the department after serving as pro- gram officer of the education portfolio for the Pew Charitable Trusts in Phila- delphia, where he was responsible for the Trusts and national initiatives in education reform. From 1991 to 1995, he was program director of education for the Lilly Endowment, where he directed all grant making related to education reform in Indiana, as well as national education policy initiatives. From 1980 to 1989, he served as policy analyst and then as director of the School Finance Collaborative at the Education Commission of the States. There, he directed national projects related to at-risk youth, education technology and education choice; participated in the design and imple- mentation of the organization's core initiatives in K-12/higher education reform; and led efforts to provide technical assistance to states in school finance and governance. McGuire received a B.A. in econom- ics from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in education administration and policy from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in public administration from the University of Colorado. Katherine Rasch is Dean and Profes- sor of Education in the School of E(luca APPE N DO 2 tion at MarywDe University in St. Louis, Missouri. She has expertise in teacher and mathematics education and coursework (resign. She is a member of the National Middle School Association, National Council of Supervisors of Math- ematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, American Association of Colleges for teacher Education. Rasch receive(1 her Ph.D. in education from Saint Louis University in 1983. She has taught at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worke(1 in collaborative (1esign of coursework with teachers in partner schools. Rasch currently serves as the president of the Missouri Association for Colleges of Teacher Education. She has published and presented on teacher education and preparation. Rasch is a member of the Program Steering Com- m~ttee for this Convocation. Nanette Seago is currently the Project Director for the Video Cases for Math- ematics Professional Development Project, funded by the National Science Foundation. This past year she directed the Mathematics Renaissance K-12 Video Pilot Stu(ly. For six years (1991-1997) she was a Regional Director for the Mi(l(lle Gra(les Mathematics Renaissance. She has taught in kindergarten anti upper elementary gra(les as well as mathematics et the mi(l(lleschoo}level. She authore the TIMSS Video Moderator's Ga~ide for the U.S. Department of Education.

OCR for page 189
Edward Silver is a Professor in the Department of Instruction and Learn- ing at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Education, and senior scien- tist with the Learning Research and Development Center. He has an extensive background in mathematics education at the secondary and post- secondary levels, having taught at the secondary level for six years and at the university level for nearly twenty years. He currently serves on the Mathemati- cal Sciences Education Board (MSEB). During 1984-1985 he worked in the private sector as Project Director for secondary school algebra and geom- etry courseware. Silver is a member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and is leader of the NCTM Standards 2000 Project, Grade 6-S Writing Group. Other activities include being a member of the editorial pane} for Cognition and Instruction, 1995-1999; member of the editorial pane} for {ournalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 1995-1998; member, Mathematical Sciences Academic Advisory Committee of the College Board, 1994-1997; and member, National Board for Professional Teach- ing Standards (NBPTS) Middle Child- hood and Early Adolescence Math- ematics Standards Committee, 1992- 1996. He has authored many profes- sional articles and has been the recipi- ent of major grants in the mathematics CONVOCATION BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS education field. Silver is the Chair of the Program Steering Committee for this Convocation. Mary Kay Stein is a Research Scien- tist at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. She has conducted numer- ous studies of cIassroom-based teaching and learning in a variety of educational reform contexts. She was the director of the documentation component of the QUASAR Project, a multi-year mi(l(lle school mathematics instructional reform project. The QUASAR research provi(le(1 measures of program imple- mentation at each of the project's six middle schools with a focus on the setup and implementation of mathematics instructional tasks. Based on this work, Stein has published a series of studies on mathematics reform and teacher professional (levelopment in high- poverty urban middle schools. Stein's current work attempts to integrate the teaching anti learning of subject matter with the stu(ly of social and organizational arrangements of schools as institutions. Currently, Stein is Director of Research for the High Performance Learning Communities Project, a multi-year OERI-fun(le(1 contract to study the district-wide, content-(lriven improvement strategy of New York City's Community School District 2.

OCR for page 189
Stein has also been active in building bridges between research and practice. Along with Margaret Smith, Marjorie Henningsen, and Edward Silver, she has authored a casebook on middle school mathematics instruction Teachers College Press, forthcoming) which builds on the research findings of the QUASAR Project. Stein is also a Co- Principal Investigator of an NSF-funded project to develop mathematics instruc- tional cases for professional develop- ment of middle school mathematics teachers. Luther Williams is the Assistant Director of Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation. The Directorate includes programs a(l(lressing pre-college, undergraduate, graduate and post(loctoral science, mathematics, engineering and technology education; human resource development activities; and a program to stimulate SET infra- structure development in states. Williams has a distinguished record as a scientist, educator, and administra- tor. He held faculty and administrative positions at Purdue University, Washing- ton University in St. Louis, the Univer- sity of Colorado, and Atlanta University. He served as the NIH Deputy Director for the National Institute of General Me(lical Sciences. Williams earned a B.A. in biology APPE N AX 2 from Miles College, an M.S. from Atlanta University, a Ph.D. from Purdue University, and was a postdoctoral biochemistry fellow at the State Univer- sity of New York at Stony Brook. The author of over 50 scientific publications, he is a member and/or fellow of several professional organizations, the recipient of four honorary doctorate degrees and the Presidential Meritorious Rank Awar(1 in 1993. Susan S. Wood is a Professor of Mathematics at the J. Sargeant Reynol(ls Community College in Richmond, Virginia. She has been actively involve(1 in national mathemat- ics education issues and has an exten- sive background in mathematics education at the community college level, having taught mathematics at the community college level for twenty-f~ve years. She received her Ed.D. from the University of Virginia in 1979. Awards inclu(le the first J. Sargeant Reynol(ls Community College Sabbatical, 1996; Distinguished Service in Mathematics Education Award, 1995; William C. Lowry Outstanding Mathematics Teacher Awar(l, Virginia Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1995; Fac- ulty Development Grant, 1995; Chan- cellors Commonwealth Professor, 1994; Employee Recognition, 1990 anti 1994; State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award,

OCR for page 189
1992; Outstanding Work in Develop- mental Studies, 1989; and Education Professions Development Act Fellow- ship, 1971-1973. Wood has strong ties to several mathematics professional organizations, significant national involvement, and has made about seventy conference presentations to students and teachers since 1990. She is a member of the National Research CONVOCATION BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS Council's Mathematical Sciences Education Board, President-Elect of the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges, and a member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the Mathematical Association of America. Wood is a member of the Program Steering Committee for this Convocation.

OCR for page 189
for Mathematics in Context as well as a teacher leader for College Preparatory Mathematics, Changes from Within. Vernon Williams specializes in teaching mathematics to gifted and talented students at the Longfellow Intermediate School in Fairfax County and has been teaching mathematics to middle school students for twenty six years in Fairfax County, Virginia. WiD iams attended the University of Mary- land where km Fey was his student teaching supervisor. He has won various teaching awards, including the 1990 Fairfax County Teacher of the Year. He has coached LongfeDoWs MathCounts Team for sixteen years and has won the State Championship thirteen times. He decided to become a Junior High School mathematics teacher as a student in middle school because he considered his teachers such great role models and wanted to emulate them. Orit ZasIavsky is a senior lecturer at the Department of Education in Tech- nology anti Science, Technion-Israe} Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. She receive(1 her Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from the Technion in 1987 anti spent the two following years as a APPE N AX 2 post doctoral fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh, where she co- authore(1 a highly cited review paper on Functions, Graphs, and Graphing. Her Ph.D. dissertation and some of her current research are connected to learning algebra in grades 7-12. Her research interests inclu(le: Students' anti teachers' mathematical thinking; the role of examples anti counter- examples in learning mathematics; analysis and enhancement classroom mathematical interactions and dis- course; and characteristics and underly- ing processes fostering the professional development of mathematics teachers and teacher educators. Zaslavsky taught secondary math- ematics for 12 years, and has been involved in teaching pre-service and in- service mathematics teachers for the past 15 years. For the past nine years she has been director of large profes- sional development projects for middle and secondary mathematics teachers. She is now a member of the Interna- tional Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathemat- ics Education (PME), and a member of the editorial board of the journal of Mathematics Teacher Education.

OCR for page 189
Biographical Statements for Speakers at the Action Conference on Research in the Teaching arc! Learning of Mathematics in the MicIcIle GracIes James Fey is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Mathematics at the University of Maryland. His special interest is development of innovative secondary school mathematics curricu- lum materials and research on their effects. He has been author of algebra materials in the Connected Mathematics Project, the Core-Plus Mathematics Project, and the Computer-Intensive Algebra project. Kueno Gravemei her is on the faculty of the Freudenthal Institute research group on mathematics education. The Freudenthal Institute (F~ is part of Utrecht University, the department of Mathematics and Computer Science and the Center for Education in the Exact ~eta) Sciences. The FT is the National Expertise Center for Mathematics Education in primary and secondary education. James Hiebert is the H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Educational Develop- ment at the University of Delaware. Hiebert worked closely with, and has co-authored with, lames Stigler on the mathematics video in TIMSS. He testified before the Committee on Science at the U.S. Congress regarding TIMSS. One focus of his work is to research and understand the effects of conceptually based instruction in mathematics. He has expertise in the whole of the TIMSS study and its following analyses, questions, concerns, and impact on current U.S. mathematics and science reform. Richarc! Lesh is the R.B. Kane Distin- guishe(1 Professor of Education, Associ- ate Dean for Research and Develop- ment, anti Director of the School Math- ematics anti Science Center at Purdue University. He is also the Director for the Princeton Research Institute on Science anti Mathematics Learning, anti Associate E(litor for Mathematical Thinking & Learning: An International Journal. Areas of specialization include research anti assessment on problem solving, learning; instruction in math- ematics anti science education, teacher education; computer-based and text- base(1 curriculum (1evelopment for chil(lren anti a(lults; anti research RESEARCH ACTION CONFERENCE BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

OCR for page 189
design in mathematics and science education. He has been a Research Director of the SIMCALC project, in collaboration with Jeremy Roschelle and km Kaput, and is the director at the Purdue satellite of the University of Wisconsin's National Center for Improv- ing Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and the Sciences. From 1994 to 1999, Dr. Lesh was the Director for Mathematics and Science Instruc- tion at the World Institute for Computer Assisted Teaching (WICAI), an(l, from 1989 to 1995, he was a Principal Scien- tist at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, where he was also the Director of the Center on Technology and Assessment. He also has served as Chief Program Designer for the Educa- tion Testing Service's PACKETS Perfor- mance Assessment System for Grades 3- 5. Dr. Lesh received a B.A. in Math- ematics and Physics from Hanover College, anti M.A. anti Ph.D. (legrees from Indiana University. Dr. Lesh was a Professor of Mathematics and Educa- tion at Northwestern University, and, from 1984 to 1989, he was Northwestern's Associate Dean for Research and Program Development in the School of Education. Dora SabeIIi is a senior program (Erector in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) at the National Science Foundation (NSF). APPE N AX 2 During part of 199S, Sabelli was on assignment to the National Science and Technology Council, working at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Now, following a career as a research scientist and faculty member, she is focusing on helping un(lerstan how to provide quality science, math- ematics, and technology education rejective of current scientific advances and technology trends. Her director- ship included coordination of the NSF- wi(le program of research in Learning and Intelligent Systems; the Research on Education, Policy anti Practice Program; anti membership in the NSF- wide Knowledge and Distributed Intelli- gence implementation group and in the EHR-wide Technology Integration into Education working group. Dr. Sabelli received a Ph.D. in Chemistry ~heo- retical Organic) from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina for research performed at the University of Chicago while a recipient of one of the first CONICET external fellowships. Her former positions include Senior Re- search Scientist, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Univer- sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Assistant Director for Education, Na- tional Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Associate Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemis- try; Large Scale Computing Coordina

OCR for page 189
for, Academic Computer Center, Univer- sity of Illinois at Chicago. She authored 11 research publications in her research field between 1980 and 1991, and has co- directed three research theses. Alan SchoenfeIc! is a member of the NationalAcademyof Education. His research deals with thinking, teaching, and learning, with an emphasis on mathematics. One focus of his work has been on problem solving, and his book, Mathematical Problem Solving (1985), characterizes what it means to "think mathematically" and describes a re- search-based undergraduate course in mathematical problem solving. A second line of his work focuses on understanding and teaching the con- cepts of functions and graphs. A third deals with assessment, and Schoenfeld heads the Balanced Assessment Project, which is developing alternative assess- ments for K-12 mathematics curricula. He chaired the National Science Foundation's Working Group on Assess- ment in Calculus, and serves on the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment. He is associ- ate editor of Cognition and Instruction and an editor of Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education. His efforts to bring together teachers, mathemati- cians, educators, and cognitive re- searchers to collaborate on issues in mathematics education have produced the two volumes: Mathematical Think- ing and Problem Solving (editor, 1994) and Cognitive Science and Mathematics Education (editor, 19871. Edward! Silver is a Professor in the Department of Instruction and Learning at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Education, and senior scientist with the Learning Research and Develop- ment Center. He has an extensive background in mathematics education at the secondary and post-secondary levels, having taught at the secondary level for six years anti at the university level for nearly twenty years. He cur- rently serves on the Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB). During 1984-1985 he worke(1 in the private sector as Project Director for secondary school algebra anti geometry courseware. Silver is a member of the National Council of Teachers of Math- ematics (NCI~M) anti is leafier of the NCTM Stan(lar(ls 2000 Project, Gra(le 6- ~ Writing Group. Other activities inclu(le being a member of the e(litorial pane} for Cognition and Instruction, 1995-1999; member of the editorial pane} for {ournalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 1995-1998; member, Math- ematical Sciences Academic Advisory Committee of the College Board, 1994- 1997; anti member, National Boar(1 for Professional Teaching Stan(lar(ls (NBPTS) Middle Childhood and Early RESEARCH ACTION CONFERENCE BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

OCR for page 189
Adolescence Mathematics Standards Committee, 1992-1996. He has authored many professional articles and has been the recipient of major grants in the mathematics education field. Silver is the Chair of the Program Steering Committee for the Convocation. Judy Sowder is a Professor of Math- ematical Sciences and Director of the Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education at San Diego State University. Before returning to study for her Ph.D., she taught elementary and middle school, then secondary and college mathematics. Since receiving a doctorate in mathematics education in 1976 she has focused her teaching on the preparation of teachers and gradu- ate students in mathematics education. She has published over forty papers, nineteen book chapters, and three books, all on topics of mathematics learning and teaching. Two of the books focus on research on preparing middle school teachers of mathematics. She is currently the Editor of the {our- nalfor Research in Mathematics Educa- tion and is the director of a curriculum (levelopment project aimed at producing course materials in mathematics for elementary and middle school teachers, both preservice anti inservice. She has served on many national and interna- tional committees anti advisory boar(ls, inclu(ling secretary anti program com APPE N DO 2 mittee member for the International Group for Psychology in Mathematics Education, steering committee member of Leading Mathematics Education into the 2ist Century Project, chair of the NCTM Standards Coordinating Com- mittee, and chair of the NCTM Re- search Advisory Committee. She has directed numerous projects funded by NSF and OERT and has received awards for teaching and research. Mary Kay Stein is a Research Scien- tist at the Learning Research anti Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. She has conducted numer- ous studies of cIassroom-base(1 teaching anti learning in a variety of e(lucational reform contexts. She was the (Erector of the documentation component of the QUASAR Project, a multi-year middle school mathematics instructional reform project. The QUASAR research provided measures of program imple- mentation at each of the project's six middle schools with a focus on the setup and implementation of mathematics instructional tasks. Based on this work, Stein has published a series of studies on mathematics reform and teacher professional development in high- poverty urban middle schools. Stein's current work attempts to integrate the teaching and learning of subject matter with the study of social and organizational arrangements of

OCR for page 189
schools as institutions. Currently, Stein is Director of Research for the High Performance Learning Communities Project, a multi-year OERI-funded contract to study the district-wide, content-driven improvement strategy of New York City's Community School District 2. Stein has also been active in building bridges between research and practice. Along with Margaret Smith, Marjorie Henningsen, and Edward Silver, she has authored a casebook on middle school mathematics instruction (Teachers College Press, forthcoming) which builds on the research findings of the QUASAR Project. Stein is also a Co- Principal Investigator of an NSF-funded project to develop mathematics instruc- tional cases for professional development of middle school mathematics teachers. Sandra WiIcox is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University (MSU) and Director of the Mathematics Assessment Resource Service (MARS). She has expertise in mathematics education and assessment, having taught education classes at the univer- sity level for twelve years anti partici- pated in several projects examining assessment in mathematics. She is a member of the American E(lucational Research Association (AERA), the National Council of Teachers of Math- ematics (NTCM), and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM). Wilcox received her Ph.D. in 1989. Prior to her work at MSU, she taught secondary mathematics in the Detroit Public Schools. She receive(1 the Outstanding Dissertation Award at MSU's College of Education in 1990. Wilcox is interested in the initial anti continuing professional development of elementary anti mi(l(lle school teachers anti the role of new forms of curriculum and assessment in fostering teacher learning anti teacher change. She is also interested in qualitative methods instruction and in collaborative studies of mathematics education reform with regard to issues of equity and access and the multiple context within which reform exists. RESEARCH ACTION CONFERENCE BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

OCR for page 189
Biographical Statements for Speakers at the Action Conference on the Professional Development of Teachers of Mathematics in the Middle Grades Deborah Loewenberg Ball is professor of educational studies at the University of Michigan. Her work as a researcher and teacher educator draws directly and indirectly on her long experience as an elementary classroom teacher. With mathematics as the main context for the work, Ball studies the practice of teaching and the processes of learning to teach. Her work also examines efforts to improve teaching through policy, reform initiatives, and teacher education. Ball's publications include articles on teacher learning and teacher education; the role of subject matter knowledge in teaching and learning to teach; endemic challenges of teaching; and the relations of policy and practice in instructional reform. Karen Economopou~os is a devel- oper of Investigations in Number, Data and Space, a K-5 mathematics curricu- lum funded by the National Science Foundation. In addition to curriculum (levelopment, she works extensively with classroom teachers, administrators, and school districts in the area of curriculum reform. She is a co-author APPE N AX 2 of Beyond Arithmetic: Changing Math- ematics in the Elementary Classroom anti a former classroom teacher. Joan Ferrini-Mundy is Director of the Mathematical Sciences Education Boar(1 anti Associate Executive Director of the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education at the National Research Council. She is on leave from her position as a professor of mathematics at the University of New Hampshire, where she joined the faculty in 1983. She hol(ls a Ph.D. in mathemat- ics education from the University of New Hampshire. Ferrini-Mun(ly taught mathematics at Mount Holyoke College in 1982-83, where she co-foun(le(1 the SummerMath for Teachers program. She was the Principal Investigator for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCI~M) Recognizing anti Recording Reform in Mathematics Education (R3M) project. She serve as a visiting scientist at the National Science Foundation from 1989-91. She chaired the NCI~M's Research Advisory Committee, was a member of the NCTM Board of Directors, and served

OCR for page 189
on the Mathematical Sciences Educa- tion Board. Ferrini-Mundy has chaired the American Educational Research Association Special Interest Group for Research in Mathematics Education. Her research interests are in calculus learning and reform in mathematics education, K-14. Currently she chairs the Writing Group for Standards 2000, the revision of the NCTM Standards. John Moyer is currently a member of the Department of Mathematics Statis- tics and Computer science at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He received a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from Christian Brothers College in 1967, an M.S. in Mathematics from Northwestern University in 1974. He taught mathematics and physics in Chicago area high schools from 1967- 1972. He joined the faculty at Marquette University in 1974, where he has taught mathematics, computer science, and mathematics education courses. Since he has been at Marquette University, he has received funding for many mathematics education projects, most aimed at improving the profes- sional development of middle school mathematics leachers. Recent projects include the Middle School Teachers' Mathematics Project (MSEMP), 1986- 98; the Metropolitan Milwaukee Math- ematics Collaborative (M3C), i989- present; the Mathematics and Science Teachers' Business and Industry Aware- ness Project, 1989-present; the QUASAR project, 1990-97; the Project for the Improvement of Mathematics Education (PRIME), 1991-96; Preparing for Alge- bra Through Community Engagement, 1995-96; Rethinking Professional Devel- opment Goals 2000, 199~; Leadership for Urban Mathematics Reform, 199& 98; Linked Learning in Mathematics Project, 1997-present. Mark Saul is a teacher at Bronxville High School, New York. He has taught for twenty-eight years and has been a Mathematics Adjunct Associate Profes- sor at City College of New York for nine years. He is also Director of the Ameri- can Regions Mathematics League Russian Exchange Program. He re- ceive(1 his Ph.D. in mathematics e(luca- tion from New York University in 1987. He was awarded the Sigma Xi Recogni- tion for Outstanding High School Science Teacher, Lehman College Chapter in 1981, anti receive(1 a Westinghouse Science Talent Search Certificate of Honor, 1980-1983. He was recognize(1 with the Presi(lential Awar for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics, NSF in 1984. Saul is a member of the NRC's Mathematical Sciences Education Board. He has been continuously active in professional workshops, activities, presentations, anti has authored over twenty publications. DEVELOPMENT ACTION CONFERENCE BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

OCR for page 189
Nanette Seago is currently the Project Director for the Video Cases for Mathematics Professional Development Project, funded by the National Science Foundation. This past year she directed the Mathematics Renaissance K-12 Video Pilot Study. For six years (1991- 1997) she was a Regional Director for the Middle Grades Mathematics Renais- sance. She has taught in kindergarten and upper elementary grades as well as mathematics at the middle school level. She authored the TIMSS Video Moderator's Ga~ide for the U.S. Depart- ment of Education. Margaret Smith is an assistant professor in the department of curricu- lum and instruction at the Pennsylvania State University. She has an Ed.D. in mathematics education from the University of Pittsburgh and has taught mathematics at the junior high, high school, and college levels. She was the coordinator of the QUASAR project between 1990 and 1997 where she focused primarily on supporting and studying the professional development of project teachers. She is currently working in preservice teacher educa- tion anti is co-principal investigator of COMET (Cases of Mathematics In- struction to Enhance Teaching), a project aimed at (1eveloping case materials for teacher professional development in mathematics. APPE N AX 2 Iris Weiss is President of Horizon Research, Inc. in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Weiss has a B.S. in biology from Cornell University, a Master's in Science Education from Harvard Uni- versity, and a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to estab- lishing HRI in 1987, Weiss was Senior Research Scientist at the Research Triangle Institute. Her activities have included directing several national surveys of science and mathematics teachers; evaluating a number of sci- ence anti mathematics education projects anti systemic reform efforts; and providing technical assistance to agencies anti professional organizations such as the National Science Founda- tion, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Council of Chief State School Officers, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Science Teachers Association and the Office of Technology Assess- ment. She is currently (Erecting the design and implementation of a 50- project cross-site evaluation of NSF's Local Systemic Change Initiative. Stephanie Williamson is the Assis- tant Director for Mathematics of the Louisiana Systemic Initiatives Program (LaSIP), has been a mathematics educator for twenty-five years, as an elementary, middle, and high school

OCR for page 189
mathematics teacher. She has held leadership positions in several of the professional organizations of which she is a member: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM), Louisiana Association of Teachers of Mathematics ~ATM), and Louisiana Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (LCSM). Williamson's primary responsibilities at LaSIP involve coordinating statewi(le mathematics professional development programs. She is currently a member of NCTM's Professional Development and Status Advisory Committee. DEVELOPMENT ACTION CONFERENCE BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

OCR for page 189