Contributors

THOMAS R. ALBRECHT is a research staff member and manager at IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. Dr. Albrecht received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. His thesis research at Stanford focused on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and included the first demonstration of micro-fabricated force-sensing cantilever probes, which are used routinely in AFM today. After graduate school, he worked briefly for Park Scientific Instruments, helping launch their first AFM product. At IBM, Dr. Albrecht's work has centered primarily on technologies for tape and disk drives. In tape technology, he contributed to a novel track-following servo technology, referred to as Timing-Based Servo, which allows higher track density and higher reliability. This technology, along with various mechanical designs of his, has been implemented in IBM's 3570 Magstar MP family of tape products, and has become the standard servo technology for the newly-launched Linear Tape Open (LTO) tape platform adopted by Hewlett-Packard, IBM, and Seagate. For disk drives, Dr. Albrecht spearheaded the development of ramp load/unload technology for IBM's Travelstar mobile disk drives. His most recent project has been mechanical design work for IBM's Microdrive 1-inch disk drive, the world's smallest, lightest disk drive intended for new markets such as digital cameras and hand-held computers. Dr. Albrecht has 30 issued U.S. patents and 28 publications. He has been elected to the IBM Academy of Technology.

THOMAS M. BRENNAN is vice president and general manager of EMCORE Photo Voltaics in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Prior to this assignment, he was the co-founder and co-president of MicroOptical Devices (MODE), an Albu-



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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering Contributors THOMAS R. ALBRECHT is a research staff member and manager at IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. Dr. Albrecht received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. His thesis research at Stanford focused on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and included the first demonstration of micro-fabricated force-sensing cantilever probes, which are used routinely in AFM today. After graduate school, he worked briefly for Park Scientific Instruments, helping launch their first AFM product. At IBM, Dr. Albrecht's work has centered primarily on technologies for tape and disk drives. In tape technology, he contributed to a novel track-following servo technology, referred to as Timing-Based Servo, which allows higher track density and higher reliability. This technology, along with various mechanical designs of his, has been implemented in IBM's 3570 Magstar MP family of tape products, and has become the standard servo technology for the newly-launched Linear Tape Open (LTO) tape platform adopted by Hewlett-Packard, IBM, and Seagate. For disk drives, Dr. Albrecht spearheaded the development of ramp load/unload technology for IBM's Travelstar mobile disk drives. His most recent project has been mechanical design work for IBM's Microdrive 1-inch disk drive, the world's smallest, lightest disk drive intended for new markets such as digital cameras and hand-held computers. Dr. Albrecht has 30 issued U.S. patents and 28 publications. He has been elected to the IBM Academy of Technology. THOMAS M. BRENNAN is vice president and general manager of EMCORE Photo Voltaics in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Prior to this assignment, he was the co-founder and co-president of MicroOptical Devices (MODE), an Albu-

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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering querque-based high technology company, which was purchased by EMCORE in December, 1997. MODE manufactures vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) components and integrated modules in volume. VCSELs are revolutionary compound semiconductor microlaser diodes that emit light vertically from the surface of the fabricated wafer. Prior to founding MODE, Mr. Brennan was a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Labs from 1986 to 1996, where he focused his efforts on the material growth of III-V compound semiconductors, reactor design, in situ reactor diagnostics, and material characterization. His activities included growth of some of the first VCSEL material at Sandia and in the U.S. and development of new and unique manufacturing techniques for VCSEL material growth. Prior to joining Sandia, Mr. Brennan was a member of the technical staff at Bell Communications Research and was an associate member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Labs. At both facilities, he focused his efforts on epitaxial materials growth and characterization and epitaxial reactor design. Mr. Brennan holds an A.S. in chemistry from the Florida Institute of Technology, a B.S. in biochemistry from Monmouth College, and an M.S. in solid state physics from Stevens Institute of Technology. He has published more than 100 articles and holds 12 patents issued and pending. ARUP K. CHAKRABORTY is a professor of chemical engineering and professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests are in polymeric materials science and engineering, interfacial phenomena, zeolite catalysis and separations, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Dr. Chakraborty received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Delaware and was a postdoctoral fellow in chemical engineering and materials science at the University of Minnesota. His awards include: research professor, Miller Institute for Basic Science, Berkeley; the Allan P. Colburn Award from AIChE, the Camille-Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, and the NSF Young Investigator Award. JAMES M. CHAVEZ is technical manager of the Solar Thermal Test Department at Sandia National Laboratories and also manages Sandia policy and governmental interactions on energy issues. He has been involved in the research, development, and demonstration of renewable technologies for utility applications since 1986. During this time he worked on both large and small solar power generation technologies. From 1994 to 1999, Mr. Chavez managed Sandia National Laboratories' activities for the Department of Energy's Concentrating Solar Power Program, Biomass Power Program, and Solar Buildings Program. He also managed the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Labs, where he was responsible for the technical staff and for all testing at the largest U.S. solar test facility. From 1991 to 1995, Mr. Chavez was the technical advisor and chair of the Solar Two Technical Advisory Committee to successfully implement the Solar Two 10 MWe molten salt solar power plant in

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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering Barstow, California. He is an active member of ASME and was a recipient of the 1997 Hispanic Professional Engineer Award, for professional achievement in solar energy development. Mr. Chavez received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. JANE H. DAVIDSON is a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota where she conducts fundamental and applied research in solar energy and air pollution control. Current emphases are in electrohydrodynamics, mixed convection heat transfer in thermosyphon heat exchangers, development of polymer heat exchangers for liquid-to-liquid heat transfer, reduction of ozone generation rates in electrostatic air cleaners, chemical vapor deposition in gaseous electrical discharges, and control of indoor air pollution. Dr. Davidson has held positions at Union Carbide Nuclear Division in Oak Ridge, Tenn.; the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France; Research Triangle Institute; Duke University; and Colorado State University. She is a Fellow of the ASME and recipient of numerous ASME Best Paper Awards. Dr. Davidson received her bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Tennessee and Ph.D. from Duke University. OREN ETZIONI is currently on leave from his position as an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington to serve as chief technical officer of Go2net, Inc., based in Seattle, Washington. He received his bachelor's degree in computer science from Harvard University and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon. He joined the University of Washington as an assistant professor of computer science and engineering in 1991 and was promoted to associate professor in 1996. In Fall 1991, Dr. Etzioni launched the Internet Softbots project. In 1993, he received an NSF Young Investigator Award. In 1995, his Rodney Softbot was chosen as one of five finalists in the National DISCOVER Awards for Technological Innovation in Computer Software. Dr. Etzioni has published more than 50 technical papers in the fields of web search, intelligent agents, data mining, user interfaces, and artificial intelligence. He is the co-founder of Netbot, Inc., which was acquired by Excite in 1997. Dr. Etzioni's research has yielded two award-winning search tools, which have been transferred to industry. His group's work on software agents has been featured in The New York Times, The Economist, Business Week, Discover Magazine, Forbes Magazine, and The New Scientist. His research interests include: software agents, web navigation and search technology, and human-computer interaction. STEPHEN P. A. FODOR is chairman and CEO of Affymetrix in Santa Clara, California. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry at Princeton, and was an NIH post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1989, his group

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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering at Affymax led the development of new technologies merging photolithography with combinatorial solid-phase chemistry to create highly dense arrays of biological compounds. In 1993, Dr. Fodor was a founding member of Affymetrix as scientific director, and in 1997, he was appointed president and CEO. Affymetrix has extended the array technology to nucleic acids and is using and commercializing oliogonucleotide arrays to study a variety of nucleic acid molecular recognition processes. Dr. Fodor is the recipient of numerous awards, including most recently in 1998, the Jacob Heskel Gabbay Award in Biotechnology and Medicine and the Association for Laboratory Automation Achievement Award. KOUROSH GHARACHORLOO is a research scientist in the Western Research Laboratory at Compaq Computer Corporation (formerly Digital Equipment Corporation). His research interests are parallel computer architecture and software, including hardware and software distributed shared memory systems, and the study of database and webserver applications. Before joining Digital, Dr. Gharachorloo was a key contributor in the Stanford Dash and Flash multi-processor projects. In addition, his thesis research on memory consistency models has influenced academic research and impacted implementations of several commercial microprocessors. Recently, Dr. Gharachorloo has been involved in the development of Shasta (a software distributed shared memory system) and in the study of commercial applications such as Oracle and Alta Vista. In addition, he has contributed substantially to the design and specification of Alpha processors and server platforms (both 21264-and 21364-based systems) and has authored a chapter of the Alpha Architecture Reference Manual. Dr. Gharachorloo received a B.S. in electrical engineering, a B.A. in economics, an M.S. in electrical engineering, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science, all from Stanford University. He has authored over 35 technical conference and journal papers and has filed over 10 patents. He also taught several short courses at Digital, lectured numerous times at Stanford, and served on various invited panels and program committees. ERIC W. KALER is Elizabeth Inez Kelley Professor of Chemical Engineering and chair of the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Delaware. He received his B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. From 1982 until 1989, Dr. Kaler was on the faculty at the University of Washington as an assistant, then associate professor. He joined the faculty at the University of Delaware in 1989. He has received numerous awards, including the ACS Delaware Section Award, the ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry, the ASEE Curtis W. McGraw Award, and the Presidential Young Investigator Award. Dr. Kaler serves on editorial boards of several journals and is a member of several advisory boards. He holds six patents.

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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering KENT KRESA is chairman of the board, president, and chief executive officer of the Northrop Grumman Corporation. Mr. Kresa joined Northrop Grumman in 1975 as vice president and manager of the company's Research and Technology Center, developing new proprietary processes and products for the company. From 1976–1982 he served as corporate vice president and general manager of the Ventura Division, a leader in the production of unmanned aeronautical vehicles. In 1982 he was appointed group vice president of the company's Aircraft Group and in 1986 was named senior vice president for technology development and planning. Before joining Northrop Grumman, Mr. Kresa served with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where he was responsible for broad applied research and development programs in the tactical and strategic defense arena. From 1961–1968 he was associated with the Lincoln Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he worked on ballistic missile defense research and reentry technology. Mr. Kresa is the recipient of many awards, including the California Industrialist of the Year, the Bob Hope Distinguished Citizen Award, the Navy League of New York's Admiral John J. Bergen Leadership Award, and 1994 Executive of the Year by the Los Angeles Business Journal. In 1998, he was elected an honorary fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the past chairman of the Board of Governors of the Aerospace Industries Association, and chairman of the Defense Policy Advisory Committee on Trade. He serves on the boards of directors of numerous corporations and foundations, and on the Board of Trustees of the California Institute of Technology. Mr. Kresa is a graduate of MIT and received a B.S. in 1959, an M.S. in 1961 and an E.A.A. in 1966, all in aeronautics and astronautics. THOMAS J. OVERBYE is an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was employed with Madison Gas and Electric Company from 1983 to 1991, where he helped develop their energy management system. In 1993 Dr. Overbye was the recipient of the IEEE Power Engineering Society Walter Fee Outstanding Young Engineer Award. Additionally, he is the author of a number of papers in the area of power system analysis, simulation, and restructuring, and is the principal developer of the PowerWorld Simulator software package. PER F. PETERSON is a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, where he teaches and conducts research in heat and mass transfer, multi-phase/multi-component flows, thermal hydraulics, and nuclear materials management. He is also chair of the Energy Resources Group, an interdisciplinary academic unit of U.C., Berkeley with programs that treat issues of energy, resources, development and international security as

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Fifth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: National Academy of Engineering the intersection of technological, economic, environmental and sociopolitical components. Dr. Peterson received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno, and his master's degree and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the faculty at Berkeley as an assistant professor in 1990, he was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellow at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He was also an engineer with Bechtel National, Inc. for three years. Dr. Peterson was a recipient of the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award and two NURETH Best Paper Awards. MICHAEL K. REITER is department head of the Secure Systems Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. He received a B.S. degree in mathematical sciences from the University of North Carolina and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Cornell University. He joined AT&T Bell Labs in 1993 and became a founding member of AT&T Labs Research when NCR and Lucent Technologies (including Bell Labs) were split from AT&T in 1996. He returned to Bell Labs in 1998 to take his current position. During 1998–2000, Dr. Reiter will serve as program chair of the flagship computer security conferences of both the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He serves on numerous other conference program committees in the areas of computer security and distributed computing. Dr. Reiter is a member of the INFOSEC Science and Technology Study Group, which was chartered by the INFOSEC Research Council to advise government agencies on funding priorities for computer security research. His research interests include all areas of computer and communications security, electronic commerce, and distributed computing. With respect to the topic of his talk, his work on system survivability includes the Rampart system, which served as the foundation for AT&T's Omega Cryptographic key management service, and the Phalanx system, which was a central component of an electronic voting system targeted for trial in the 1998 Costa Rican presidential elections. MING C. WU is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the director of the MURI Center on RF Photonic Material Devices, sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, he was a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories (now Lucent Technologies), where he conducted research in high-speed semiconductor lasers and optoelectronics. His current research interests include optical MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) or MOEMS, high-speed optoelectronics, and microwave photonics. Dr. Wu has served as chair or on the program committee for numerous conferences in his field. He received a Packard Foundation Fellowship in 1992. He has published over 100 journal papers, 150 conference papers, contributed one book chapter, and holds 8 U.S. patents. Dr. Wu received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.