in Chapter 3, which are extrapolated from adult values based on lean body mass and need for growth.

Vitamin E EAR and RDA Summary, Ages 1 through 18 Years

EAR for Children

 

1–3 years

5 mg (11.6 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

4–8 years

6 mg (14.0 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

EAR for Boys

 

9–13 years

9 mg (20.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

14–18 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

EAR for Girls

 

9–13 years

9 mg (20.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

14–18 years

12 mg (27.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

The RDA for vitamin E is set by assuming a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10 percent (see Chapter 1) because information is not available on the standard deviation of the requirement for vitamin E; the RDA is defined as equal to the EAR plus twice the assumed CV to cover the needs of 97 to 98 percent of the individuals in the group (therefore, for vitamin E the RDA is 120 percent of the EAR). The calculated RDA in milligrams is rounded.

RDA for Children

 

1–3 years

6 mg (13.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

4–8 years

7 mg (16.3 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

RDA for Boys

 

9–13 years

11 mg (25.6 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

14–18 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

RDA for Girls

 

9–13 years

11mg (25.6 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

14–18 years

15 mg (34.9 µmol)/day of α-tocopherol

Adults Ages 19 through 50 Years
Evidence Considered in Estimating the Average Requirement

As stated earlier, although it is known that humans require vitamin E (Cavalier et al., 1998; Hassan et al., 1966; Oski and Barness, 1967; Sokol et al., 1984), overt vitamin E deficiency (characterized by sensory neuropathy, increased erythrocyte fragility, and increased ethane and pentane production) is rare in the United States and



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