TABLE C-2 Total (Diet + Supplements) Vitamin C Intake (mg): Mean and Selected Percentiles, United States, NHANES III, 1988–1994

Sexa and Age

Number of Persons Examined

Selected Percentiles

   

Mean

1st

5th

Both sexes, 0–6 mo

413

100.3

54.9

65.5

Both sexes, 7–12 mo

579

122.5

62.8

70.9

Both sexes, 1–3 y

3,623

121.1

53.0

62.8

Both sexes, 4–8 y

4,663

136.2

58.7

70.9

M, 9–13 y

1,262

143.2

44.1

59.2

M, 14–18 y

938

156.7

37.3

60.8

M, 19–30 y

1,960

172.9

36.3

59.5

M, 31–50 y

2,611

187.1

36.4

55.8

M, 51–70 y

2,029

199.4

34.0

49.8

M, 71+ y

1,321

176.3

38.2

52.5

F, 9–13 y

1,279

129.8

44.2

63.5

F, 14–18 y

707

145.5

31.1

50.1

F, 19–30 y

1,106

121.9

31.1

44.4

F, 31–50 y

2,644

165.1

31.0

48.1

F, 51–70 y

2,143

202.4

37.7

52.3

F, 71+ y

1,436

192.3

46.8

62.2

Pregnant

214

192.7

68.9

77.7

Lactating

100

195.9

60.5

76.6

All individuals (+P/L)

29,022

167.2

45.5

61.9

All individuals

28,714

186.9

44.6

61.0

NOTE: Estimated mean and selected percentiles of the usual intake distribution of vitamin C, computed using intakes from food and supplement sources. Dietary intake data are from NHANES III. Intakes from food were adjusted using C-SIDE and the method presented by Nusser SM, Carriquiry AL, Dodd KW, Fuller WA. 1996. A semiparametric transformation approach to estimating usual daily intake distributions. J Am Stat Assoc 91:1440–1449. However, intakes from supplements are unadjusted, so the day-to-day variability in intakes may not have been totally removed from the data. Standard errors were not available for this data set.



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