TABLE D-2 Mean and Percentiles for Usual Intake of Vitamin E (α-Tocopherol Equivalents, mg), CSFII, 1994–1996

Sexa and Age

Number of Persons Examined

Selected Percentiles

   

Mean

1st

5th

0 to 6 mo

209

10.7

0.4

1.5

Standard error

 

0.5

0.1

0.3

7 to 12 mo

139

10.3

1.0

2.8

Standard error

 

0.6

0.4

0.4

1 to 3 y

1,908

4.7

1.9

2.5

Standard error

 

0.1

0.1

0.1

4 to 8 y

1,711

5.8

3.1

3.7

Standard error

 

0.1

0.1

0.1

M, 9 to 13 y

574

8.1

3.4

4.4

Standard error

 

0.4

0.2

0.2

M, 14 to 18 y

474

9.3

3.9

5.1

Standard error

 

0.3

0.3

0.3

M, 19 to 30 y

920

10.3

3.9

5.1

Standard error

 

0.3

0.2

0.3

M, 31 to 50 y

1,806

10.2

3.7

4.9

Standard error

 

0.3

0.1

0.1

M, 51 to 70 y

1,680

9.6

3.1

4.4

Standard error

 

0.3

0.1

0.1

M, 71+ y

722

8.6

2.2

3.3

Standard error

 

0.3

0.1

0.1

F, 9 to 13 y

586

6.9

3.3

4.1

Standard error

 

0.2

0.2

0.2

F, 14 to 18 y

449

7.0

3.7

4.5

Standard error

 

0.3

0.6

0.5

F, 19 to 30 y

808

7.1

3.2

4.0

Standard error

 

0.2

0.2

0.2

F, 31 to 50 y

1,690

7.4

2.8

3.7

Standard error

 

0.2

0.1

0.1

F, 51 to 70 y

1,605

7.0

2.4

3.4

Standard error

 

0.1

0.1

0.1

F, 71+ y

670

6.4

2.1

2.9

Standard error

 

0.2

0.1

0.1

F, Pregnant

80

7.8

3.9

4.7

Standard error

 

0.7

1.1

0.9

F, Lactating

43

9.1

3.5

4.5

Standard error

 

1.1

1.0

1.0

All Individuals

15,951

8.1

2.4

3.5

Standard error

 

0.1

0.1

0.1

All Individuals (+P/L)

16,075

8.1

2.4

3.5

Standard error

 

0.1

0.1

0.1

NOTE: Estimated mean and standard deviation, and selected percentiles of the usual intake distribution of vitamin E, computed using intake from food sources alone. Dietary intake data are from CSFII, and the distribution was adjusted using C-SIDE and the method presented in Nusser SM, Carriquiry AL, Dodd KW, Fuller WA. 1996. A semiparametric transformation approach to estimating usual daily intake distributions. J Am Stat Assoc 91:1440–1449. Data corresponding to age groups 0–6 months, 7–12 months, and 1–3 years of age were not adjusted because no replicate vitamin E intake data are available for children under 3 years.



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