Appendix B

Committee on National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Scientists

Howard Hiatt, M.D., chair, is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and senior physician at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Former head of the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, and former dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Hiatt received his M.D. from Harvard University. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine of since 1971 and is also a member of the Association of American Physicians, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (where he is director of the Initiatives for Children Program), the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the American Public Health Association. His research articles have appeared in the Journal of Molecular Biology, Nature, Science, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Clinical Investigation, New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. In addition, he has written for the lay press in areas of America 's health care system, disease prevention, health services research, and health implications of the nuclear arms race.

Gail H. Cassell, Ph.D., is vice president of infectious diseases, drug discovery research, and clinical investigation, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Research Laboratories, in Indianapolis, Indiana. She is the former Charles H. McCauley professor and chairman of the Department of Microbiology at the University of Alabama Schools of Medicine and Dentistry at Birmingham. Under her leadership, the department ranked first in the nation in research funding from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Cassell has been involved in the establishment of science policy and legislation related to biomedical research and public health. She is a recent past president of the American Society for Microbiology and currently serves as chairman of its Public and Scientific Affairs Board. A member of the Institute of Medicine, she has served as an advisor to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on infectious diseases and indirect costs of research. She has also served as a member of the NIH Director's Advisory Committee and the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Cassell's major research contribution to the field of microbiology in the recent past has been the establishment of Ureaplasma urealyticum as a significant cause of chorioamnionitis and disease in premature human infants. She has received several national research awards, has published over 300 articles and book chapters, and holds an honorary degree from the Thomas Jefferson University Medical College.

Janice G. Douglas, M.D., is professor of medicine and professor of physiology and biophysics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She is also director of the Hypertension Division and vice chairperson for academic affairs for the Department of Medicine. Dr. Douglas received her M.D. from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association for American Physicians, the Association for Academic Minority Physicians (of which she is a past president), the Central Society for Clinical Research, and the Institute of Medicine. She has served on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Advisory Council of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Dr. Douglas has authored a substantial number of medical publications and has been a member of editorial boards



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 66
ADDRESSING THE NATION'S CHANGING NEEDS FOR BIOMEDICAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENTISTS Appendix B Committee on National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Scientists Howard Hiatt, M.D., chair, is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and senior physician at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Former head of the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, and former dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Hiatt received his M.D. from Harvard University. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine of since 1971 and is also a member of the Association of American Physicians, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (where he is director of the Initiatives for Children Program), the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the American Public Health Association. His research articles have appeared in the Journal of Molecular Biology, Nature, Science, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Clinical Investigation, New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. In addition, he has written for the lay press in areas of America 's health care system, disease prevention, health services research, and health implications of the nuclear arms race. Gail H. Cassell, Ph.D., is vice president of infectious diseases, drug discovery research, and clinical investigation, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Research Laboratories, in Indianapolis, Indiana. She is the former Charles H. McCauley professor and chairman of the Department of Microbiology at the University of Alabama Schools of Medicine and Dentistry at Birmingham. Under her leadership, the department ranked first in the nation in research funding from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Cassell has been involved in the establishment of science policy and legislation related to biomedical research and public health. She is a recent past president of the American Society for Microbiology and currently serves as chairman of its Public and Scientific Affairs Board. A member of the Institute of Medicine, she has served as an advisor to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on infectious diseases and indirect costs of research. She has also served as a member of the NIH Director's Advisory Committee and the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Cassell's major research contribution to the field of microbiology in the recent past has been the establishment of Ureaplasma urealyticum as a significant cause of chorioamnionitis and disease in premature human infants. She has received several national research awards, has published over 300 articles and book chapters, and holds an honorary degree from the Thomas Jefferson University Medical College. Janice G. Douglas, M.D., is professor of medicine and professor of physiology and biophysics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She is also director of the Hypertension Division and vice chairperson for academic affairs for the Department of Medicine. Dr. Douglas received her M.D. from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association for American Physicians, the Association for Academic Minority Physicians (of which she is a past president), the Central Society for Clinical Research, and the Institute of Medicine. She has served on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Advisory Council of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Dr. Douglas has authored a substantial number of medical publications and has been a member of editorial boards

OCR for page 66
ADDRESSING THE NATION'S CHANGING NEEDS FOR BIOMEDICAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENTISTS and publication committees for a number of medical journals, including the Journal of Clinical Investigation, American Journal of Physiology, Circulation, Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, and Ethnicity and Disease. Richard B. Freeman, Ph.D., is the Ascherman Chair of Economics at Harvard University. He serves as faculty cochair of the Harvard University Trade Union Program and is director of the National Bureau of Economic Research 's Program in Labor Studies. At the London School of Economics he is executive director of the Programme in Discontinuous Economics, a major program in economic analysis using neural nets and new data mining tools. Dr. Freeman received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served on several panels of the National Academy of Sciences, including High Risk Youth, Post Secondary Education and Training in the Workplace, Employment and Technical Change, and Demographic and Economic Impacts of Immigration. Professor Freeman has published over 250 articles and has written or edited 21 books, several of which have been translated into French, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese. Lee Goldman, M.D., is the Julius R. Krevans Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also serves as associate dean for clinical affairs in the School of Medicine. He received an M.D. and M.P.H. from Yale University School of Medicine and an honorary M.A. from Harvard University. His major research interests include the prediction of diagnosis and outcome of common cardiac complaints and problems, clinical utility and cost effectiveness of diagnostic tests and therapeutic interventions, and development and application of multivariate analytical techniques. Dr. Goldman is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, an officer of the Association of American Physicians, past president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, a member of the Association of Professors of Medicine, a director of the American Board of Internal Medicine, a member of the Institute of Medicine, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served as an associate editor of the New England Journal of Medicine and is now editor of the American Journal of Medicine, as well as lead coeditor of the Cecil Textbook of Medicine. Leland H. Hartwell, Ph.D., is president and director of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a member of the Department of Genetics at the University of Washington. His research has emphasized the identification of genetic programs that control cell division and mating in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. An American Cancer Society research professor and member of the National Academy of Sciences, he is a recipient of the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and Immunology, General Motors Sloan Award, Hoffman LaRoche Mattia Award, Gairdner Foundation International Award, Brandeis University Rosensteil Award, Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Katharine Berkan Judd Award, the Genetics Society of America Medal, MGH Warren Triennial Prize, Columbia University Horwitz Award, American Society of Cell Biology's Keith Porter Award, Passano Award, and the Carnegie Mellon Dickson Prize. John F. Kihlstrom, Ph.D., is professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and has previously served on the faculties of Harvard University, Stanford University, University of Wisconsin, University of Arizona, and Yale University. His research focuses on cognition in personality and social interaction, unconscious mental processes, and memory and has been funded continuously by the NIH since 1977. Dr. Kihlstrom currently holds a MERIT award from the National Institute of Mental Health. From 1992 to 1995 he served as cochair of the NIMH Basic Behavioral Science Task Force. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis and is a charter fellow of the American Psychological Society. Dr. Kihlstrom has published over 160 articles and book chapters, coauthored one book, and coedited three others. Additionally, he has held a number of editorial appointments and currently serves as the editor of Psychological Science. Ellen M. Markman, Ph.D., is associate dean for the social sciences and professor of psychology at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests are cognitive and early language development. Dr. Markman has been a member of the Advisory Board of Learning,

OCR for page 66
ADDRESSING THE NATION'S CHANGING NEEDS FOR BIOMEDICAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENTISTS Development, and Conceptual Change (Bradford Books), the Cognition, Emotion, and Personality Review section in NIMH, the Child Development Subcommittee of the Social Science Research Council, the Steering Committee of the Study of Stanford and the Schools, the Executive Committee of the Sloan Cognitive Science Program at Stanford (which she also chaired), the Governing Council of the Society for Research in Child Development, and the Executive Committee of the Children and Society Curriculum. She has served on a number of editorial boards, including those for Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Development, Contemporary Psychology, Developmental Psychology, and Child Development. Dr. Markman is the author of one book and over 50 articles that have appeared in Corrective Psychiatry, Child Development, Cognition, Contemporary Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Journal of Educational Psychology, Merrill Palmer Quarterly, and American Scientist, among others. Edward E. Penhoet, Ph.D., is dean of the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. He is former president and chief executive officer of the Chiron Corporation in Emeryville, California, and now serves as adjunct professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Washington. Dr. Penhoet is a member of the American Society of Biological Chemists, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Chemical Society. He is the author of over 50 articles that have appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Annals New York Academy of Science, Biochemistry, Federation Proceedings, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Virology, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Methods in Enzymology, Developmental Biology, Molecular Biology and Medicine, and the American Journal of Human Genetics, among others. Steven A. Schroeder, M.D., is president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. He also practices general internal medicine part-time at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, where he is clinical professor of medicine. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and honorary doctorates from Rush University, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Schroeder has been a member of many health care organizations, including Alpha Omega Alpha, the American College of Physicians (master), the American Public Health Association, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine, the United States Prospective Payment Assessment Commission, and the Society of General Internal Medicine (of which he is a past president). He chairs the International Advisory Committee of the Faculty of Medicine at Ben-Gurion University in Israel. To his credit are more than 200 publications in the fields of clinical medicine, health care organization and financing, manpower, quality of care, and preventive medicine. He has served on a number of editorial boards, including, at present, the New England Journal of Medicine. Michael S. Teitelbaum, D. Phil., is a program director at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in New York, New York. He received his D.Phil. in demography from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes scholar, and has been a member of the faculties of Oxford University and Princeton University, staff director of the Select Committee on Population in the U.S. House of Representatives, and a professional staff member of the Ford Foundation and of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has also served as a commissioner of the U.S. Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development. He was elected first vice president of the Population Association of America, the scientific society of demographers, and until December 1997 was vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform. Dr. Teitelbaum is a regular speaker on demographic change, immigration, and the science and engineering workforce, and a frequently invited witness before committees of the U.S. Congress and publishes extensively in scientific and popular journals and in national op-ed pages. He is the author of five books and many articles.