Appendix F
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Herbert K. Brunkhorst (Co-chair) is professor of Science Education and Biology at California State University-San Bernardino, and chair of the Department of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education in the College of Education. He carries a joint appointment in the Department of Biology in the College of Natural Sciences. Dr. Brunkhorst earned a Ph.D. with majors in science education and plant physiology at The University of Iowa. He has been a science educator for the past 33 years; 17 years at the precollege level and 16 at the college level. Dr. Brunkhorst was co-principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded California State University Science Teaching Development Project from 1993-1995, a university system-wide collaboration to improve science teacher preparation. From 1995-1997, he served as a senior faculty researcher on a U.S. Department of Education and Office of Educational Research and Improvement project called the Salish Consortium, a multidimensional collaborative research effort for improving science and mathematics teacher education. In 1998, Dr. Brunkhorst was selected as a California State University Chancellor’s Teacher Preparation Scholar to serve as a member of a statewide teacher preparation curriculum development team to produce an Internet-based elementary teacher preparation program. For the past 11 years, Dr. Brunkhorst has served as co-director of the Inland Area Science Project, a regional collaborative professional development program in science for K-12 teachers under the sponsorship of the California Subject Matter Projects.

W. J. (Jim) Lewis (Co-chair) is chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Nebraska-



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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Herbert K. Brunkhorst (Co-chair) is professor of Science Education and Biology at California State University-San Bernardino, and chair of the Department of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education in the College of Education. He carries a joint appointment in the Department of Biology in the College of Natural Sciences. Dr. Brunkhorst earned a Ph.D. with majors in science education and plant physiology at The University of Iowa. He has been a science educator for the past 33 years; 17 years at the precollege level and 16 at the college level. Dr. Brunkhorst was co-principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded California State University Science Teaching Development Project from 1993-1995, a university system-wide collaboration to improve science teacher preparation. From 1995-1997, he served as a senior faculty researcher on a U.S. Department of Education and Office of Educational Research and Improvement project called the Salish Consortium, a multidimensional collaborative research effort for improving science and mathematics teacher education. In 1998, Dr. Brunkhorst was selected as a California State University Chancellor’s Teacher Preparation Scholar to serve as a member of a statewide teacher preparation curriculum development team to produce an Internet-based elementary teacher preparation program. For the past 11 years, Dr. Brunkhorst has served as co-director of the Inland Area Science Project, a regional collaborative professional development program in science for K-12 teachers under the sponsorship of the California Subject Matter Projects. W. J. (Jim) Lewis (Co-chair) is chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Nebraska-

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium Lincoln, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1971. Dr. Lewis holds B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from Louisiana State University. His leadership in mathematics education includes a number of local, state, and national activities aimed at improving K-12 education and teacher preparation. He currently serves as chair of the Mathematical Association of America’s Steering Committee on the Mathematics Education of Teachers. Dr. Lewis was co-principal investigator of the Nebraska National Science Foundation State Systemic Initiative from 1991-1997, and he regularly gives invited talks about education to new mathematics department chairs and new mathematics faculty members (via Project NeXT). Toby Caplin has been a teacher since 1973. In 1974, she joined the Graham and Parks School, which is a racially, ethnically, economically diverse K-8 alternative public school in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition to teaching, Ms. Caplin is a staff developer for the Cambridge Public Schools mathematics department, for which she runs numerous inservice workshops on learning and teaching in mathematics. She also served as an educational consultant, primarily with Bolt Baranek and Newman in Cambridge, where she was the education specialist. The National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded projects she has worked on include sense-making in science and inquiry in mathematics (involving videotape and other technologies). Ms. Caplin works in many capacities for her school’s professional development relationship with the University of Massachusetts-Boston; she serves as a graduate seminar developer and co-teacher for practicum students and was the liaison between the two institutions for many years. Rodney L. Custer has chaired the Department of Industrial Technology at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois, since joining the faculty there in 1997. Dr. Custer earned a Ph.D. in Industrial Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia then joined the faculty there in 1991 as Assistant Professor in the Department of Practical Arts and Vocational-Technical Education. He is a national leader in technology education, and he chaired the secondary level standards development team for the Technology for All Americans project. He has been a member of the review board for the Journal of Industrial Teacher Education. Penny J. Gilmer is professor of Chemistry at Florida State University, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1977. She holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Cali-

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium fornia-Berkeley and is currently working toward a second doctorate, D.Sc.Ed., at Curtin University, Perth, Australia. In addition to holding faculty positions, she has served as associate department chair and interim associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Gilmer has received funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for science teacher preparation and enhancement programs, which she has co-directed with colleagues in the College of Education. Her publications on science teacher preparation and professional development include action research investigations with preservice and inservice teachers. Her awards and distinctions include election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Innovation in Teaching Science Teachers award from the Association for the Education of Teachers of Science (AETS). Martin L. Johnson is professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Maryland. He began his career as a junior and senior high-school mathematics and science teacher, then went on to receive the M.Ed. and Ed.D. degrees. He joined the faculty at the University of Maryland in 1972 and was promoted to full professor in 1986. He is currently chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, a large teacher education department charged with preparing elementary, secondary, college, and university teachers in a variety of content areas, including science and mathematics education. His work in mathematics education includes numerous peer-reviewed publications, leadership roles in mathematics education and minority educational organizations, and consulting positions with both K-12 and postsecondary education institutions. He has served as Senior Researcher for two National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored projects in mathematics education. In addition to his scholarship, Dr. Johnson has supervised more than 15 doctoral dissertations in mathematics education during his career at the University of Maryland. Harvey B. Keynes is a professor of Mathematics, past director of education in the Geometry Center, and director of education programs for a new Institute of Technology Center at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in dynamical systems. Professor Keynes has directed the following projects: The University of Minnesota Talented Youth Program; the National Science Foundation (NSF) Teacher Renewal Project; the NSF-supported Minnesota Mathematics Mobilization project; the Ford Foundation Urban Mathematics Collaborative; the NSF-supported Young Scholars Project; the

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium Bush Foundation Project to increase female participation in the University of Minnesota’s Talented Youth Program; the NSF-funded Early Alert Initiative; and a new, reformed calculus program for engineering students. Professor Keynes also has taught calculus in the University of Minnesota’s Talented Youth Program and has been a teacher in the NSF Teacher Renewal Project. He has extensive contacts in Minnesota and national mathematics education and high technology committees. He was a member of the National Research Council’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB) and is the recipient of the American Mathematical Society’s 1992 Award for Distinguished Public Service. R. Heather Macdonald is associate professor of Geology and chair of the Department of Geology at the College of William and Mary, where she recently served as dean of Undergraduate Studies, Arts and Sciences. She is a past president of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) and has co-organized numerous NAGT workshops on innovative and effective teaching and course design in the geosciences, as well as workshops for early career faculty. She also has served as chair of the Education Committee of the Geological Society of America and of the K-12 Earth Science Education Committee of the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM). She received the Biggs Earth Science Teaching Award from the Geological Society of America and the Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award from the College of William and Mary. Dr. Macdonald received a B.A. in geology from Carleton College and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Mark Saul is a teacher at Bronxville High School, New York. He has taught high school for 28 years and has been an adjunct associate professor of Mathematics at City College of New York for 9 years. He also is director of the American Regions Mathematics League Russian Exchange Program. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from New York University in 1987. In 1981, he received the Sigma Xi Recognition for Outstanding High-School Science Teacher, Lehman College Chapter, and, for 1980-83, a Westinghouse Science Talent Search Certificate of Honor. In 1984, he received the Presidential Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics, National Science Foundation. In 1985, he received the Admiral Hyman L. Rickover Foundation Fellowship, was a Tandy Scholar in 1994, and received the Gabriella and Paul Rosenbaum Foundation Fellowship in 1995. Dr. Saul

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium is a member of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB) of the National Research Council (NRC) and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He has extensive experience as a judge of mathematical competitions and is an expert on Russian mathematics education. He is a member of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) and is active in the mathematics teaching standards revision effort of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), currently chairing the Student Services Committee. Dr. Saul has been continuously active in professional workshops and presentations throughout his career and has authored over 20 publications. M. Gail Shroyer is associate professor of Science Education at Kansas State University (KSU). She holds a B.A. in Biology from University of California -Santa Cruz and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Curriculum and Instruction from KSU. She has an extensive background in science teacher preparation, including as coordinator of Professional Development Schools at KSU, as co-editor of the Journal of Science Teacher Education, and as principal investigator or director of numerous teacher education improvement projects supported by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Science Foundation. She also has served as a member of the Advisory Board of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS). Larry Sowder is professor of Mathematics at San Diego State University. He received the B.S. and M.A.T. degrees from Indiana University, and then taught high-school mathematics and physics. After completing his Ph.D. in mathematics education at the University of Wisconsin, he joined the faculty at Northern Illinois University and was promoted to full professor in 1984. He moved to San Diego State University in 1986, where he continues to devote much of his attention to developing mathematics courses for preservice and inservice elementary and secondary mathematics teachers. Dan B. Walker is professor of Biology and Science Education at San Jose State University. Dr. Walker is currently co-principal investigator of the San Francisco Bay Area Collaborative for Excellence in Teacher Preparation. He has won awards for teaching from both the University of Georgia and the University of California at Los Angeles. Dr. Walker developed an off-campus program for the employees of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to obtain a Single Subject Teaching Credential in Science in California and is currently co-director of

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium this program. He has published articles about this work, most recently in the form of essays in a volume on preparing scientists and mathematicians to become teachers. VivianLee Ward is director of the Access Excellence program (founded by Genentech, Inc.), director of CyberEducation at the National Health Museum, and a former high-school biology teacher. She has presented numerous papers on science teacher development at meetings of the National Science Teachers’ Association (NSTA), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT), the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and Sigma Xi. During her decade of participation in the Stanford Teacher Education Project, she supervised 13 student teachers and interns. Ms. Ward has consulted nationwide in relation to science education, professional development, and uses of technology in education. She has received many accolades for her teaching and other contributions to life science education, including the Labosky Award for Outstanding Contribution to Teacher Education (1989), the California Outstanding Biology Teacher Award (1992), and Mentor Teacher of the Year Award (1994). She is on the Advisory Boards of the California Science Subject Matter Project and SETI’s Voyage Through Time Project and is currently completing her doctorate in Teaching and Learning at the University of Southern California. Lucy West is director of Mathematics, K-12, in New York City’s Community School District 2. She is presently principal investigator for a National Science Foundation Local Systemic Change project on teacher enhancement that involves over l,200 teachers in 48 schools. Ms. West is a District Fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh, where she is working on a research project that centers around the development of effective coaching strategies for practicing teachers: Content Focused Coaching. She is an adjunct instructor teaching mathematics methods courses at City College of New York and at Bank Street College of Education. Ms. West has consulted nationwide in relation to mathematics education and professional development. She is a member of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM), the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), and the National Council of Staff Developers (NCSD).

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Educating Teachers of Science, Mathematics, and Technology: New Practices for the New Millenium Susan S. Wood is professor of Mathematics, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Richmond, Virginia, and president of the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC). She was a member of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB) of the National Research Council (NRC) from 1998-2000. She received her Ed.D. in Mathematics Education from the University of Virginia in 1979. She has taught mathematics at the community college level for the past 27 years. Her awards include the first J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Sabbatical, 1996; Distinguished Service in Mathematics Education Award, 1995; William C. Lowry Outstanding Mathematics Teacher Award, Virginia Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1995; Faculty Development Grant, 1995; Chancellors Commonwealth Professor, 1994; Employee Recognition, 1990 and 1994; State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award, 1992; and Outstanding Work in Developmental Studies, 1989. Dr. Wood has strong ties to several mathematics professional organizations, is significantly involved in mathematics education reform at the national level, and has made more than 100 conference presentations to students and teachers since 1990. She is a member of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). For six years she served as the Mid-Atlantic Vice President of AMATYC.

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