G

Committee Biographies

Mr. Vincent Vitto is president and chief executive officer (CEO) at C.S. Draper Laboratory. Mr. Vitto’s expertise is in defense technology and its application to naval forces, particularly in space communications and radar technologies. Mr. Vitto’s previous positions were with the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he rose from head of the Communications Division to assistant director of the Laboratory. He was responsible for technology and system concept development programs including surface surveillance and communications technology. Mr. Vitto has participated extensively in activities of the Air Force Science Advisory Board and currently is a member of the Defense Science Board. Mr. Vitto is chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board.

Dr. Alan Berman, a private consultant, currently consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. He also consults for the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) programs. Dr. Berman has an extensive background in defense research. His previous positions include dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.



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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities G Committee Biographies Mr. Vincent Vitto is president and chief executive officer (CEO) at C.S. Draper Laboratory. Mr. Vitto’s expertise is in defense technology and its application to naval forces, particularly in space communications and radar technologies. Mr. Vitto’s previous positions were with the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he rose from head of the Communications Division to assistant director of the Laboratory. He was responsible for technology and system concept development programs including surface surveillance and communications technology. Mr. Vitto has participated extensively in activities of the Air Force Science Advisory Board and currently is a member of the Defense Science Board. Mr. Vitto is chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board. Dr. Alan Berman, a private consultant, currently consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. He also consults for the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) programs. Dr. Berman has an extensive background in defense research. His previous positions include dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities Mr. Gregory R. Blackburn is assistant vice president of the Technology Research Group at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Mr. Blackburn’s background is in Department of Defense (DOD) information operations and space programs. Prior to joining SAIC, Mr. Blackburn served as the director of information operations for the Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD), where he directed efforts in policy for DOD information operations and space control programs. Mr. Blackburn’s experience includes over 29 years as a naval cryptologic officer doing threat analysis and assessing vulnerability of state-of-the-art C4ISR, intelligence, information operations, and information programs. Dr. Norval L. Broome is a senior Navy C4ISR systems analyst for the Naval and Technology Division at MITRE Corporation. Dr. Broome’s expertise is in telecommunication systems engineering and naval C4I systems with emphasis in tactical and strategic submarine communications. He formerly held positions as director of MITRE’s San Diego operations and department head for Naval Communications Systems, where he managed MITRE’s work program with SPAWAR. Prior to joining MITRE, Dr. Broom was a senior engineer with Honeywell, Inc., Marine Systems Center where he provided detailed design and performance predictions for sonar subsystems used in Navy torpedoes. Dr. Broome’s professional career includes 20 years of Navy service as an engineering duty officer. Dr. Broome is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Dr. John D. Christie is a senior fellow at the Logistics Management Institute. Dr. Christie has an extensive background in DOD acquisition policy and program analysis. From 1989 to 1993, he was director of Acquisition Policy and Program Integration for the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition). In his role as director, Dr. Christie directed the preparation of a comprehensive revision to all defense acquisition policies and procedures resulting in the cancellation and consolidation of 500 prior separate issuances. He has been an active participant in NRC studies, and, most recently served as co-chair of the Committee on Shore Installation Readiness and Management. General John A. Corder retired as a Major General from the U.S. Air Force (USAF) in 1992. General Corder has extensive experience in U.S. Air Force operational and joint issues. Since retiring, General Corder has been employed as an independent technical advisor. He has served as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board on the subjects of theater battle management, new world vistas, and tactical ballistic missile defense. General Corder’s military career also includes assignments as a fighter wing commander and commander of the USAF Warfare Center. He was also deputy commander for Air Combat Operations for the Central Command Air Forces in the 1991 Persian Gulf War. General Corder was responsible for the planning and execution of 3,000 combat

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities sorties per day—an effort that involved the coordination of Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and allied aircraft from nine other nations. Dr. John R. Davis, a private consultant, most recently worked as director of engineering, TRW Logistics, Support and Test Evaluation Division. Dr. Davis’s background is Navy technology and requirements development, particularly in regard to command and control and information systems. He retired from government service as technical director and chief scientist for the Navy’s Space, Command and Control, and Information Warfare Division. He was responsible for the acquisition of an advanced technology program for a sensor-to-shooter system prototype to provide real-time intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance planning and in-cockpit execution, support for maritime power projection. Dr. Davis managed the redirection of Navy telecommunication programs into the evolution of multimedia, multiservice networks for space and terrestrial military and commercial communications. Dr. Davis has been employed at the Naval Research Laboratory in a number of positions, including superintendent of the Information Technology Division. Dr. Paul K. Davis is a senior scientist at RAND, where he works primarily on defense planning. Dr. Davis’s background is in strategic planning and program analysis and evaluation. Dr. Davis is also on the faculty of the RAND Graduate School and is chair of its international security and defense planning program. Earlier he served a 5-year tour as corporate research manager for defense and technology planning and as program manager for strategic planning and assessment. Prior to joining RAND, Dr. Davis was a senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation. Dr. Davis is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Mr. Seymour J. Deitchman is a private consultant on national security, research and development management, and systems evaluation. A mechanical and aeronautical engineer by training, Mr. Deitchman served at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) as vice president for programs. As a senior research associate at IDA, he was responsible for projects on tactical aviation and man-in-space and man-in-the loop simulation. He served as assistant vice president for research and vice president for planning and evaluation. Mr. Deitchman once served as director of overseas defense research at the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), where he was responsible for planning and executing ARPA’s R&D program on counterinsurgency and related technical matters in support of U.S. military operations in Southeast Asia and some operations in the Middle East. He has been a member of various government advisory panels on national security matters.

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities Dr. John F. Egan is a private consultant who retired in 1998 as vice president for corporate development at Lockheed Martin Corporation. Dr. Egan has been responsible for providing support to three successive chief executives in defining and implementing strategic plans to consolidate the defense industry. Dr. Egan has a broad understanding of Navy programs, business and strategic planning, and acquisition and policy. An electrical engineer by training, Dr. Egan is a former chief scientist for the Chief of Naval Operations and has extensive experience with electronic and information warfare. Dr. Egan is a current member of the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel. Dr. Egan has participated in numerous NRC studies. He recently served as co-chair of the Committee on Shore Installation Readiness and Management. Mr. Brig “Chip” Elliott is a lead scientist with Bolt, Beranek, and Newman (BBN) responsible for designing, developing, and integrating tactical and commercial communications systems for government and commercial organizations. His expertise includes wireless network technologies and tactical and commercial communication systems. As the technical lead scientist at BBN, he uses Internet technology to build networks for international corporations and U.S. government agencies. Mr. Elliott was the chief architect who designed the networking component of the U.S. Army’s Near-Term Digital Radio (NTDR) program. This program is a fully mobile, secure, and highly survivable telecommunications system that will form the backbone of the Army’s tactical Internet. Mr. Elliott has served on an Army Science Board study on tactical Internet design. Dr. Edward A. Feigenbaum is Kumagai Professor of Computer Science and Co-Scientific Director of the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. Dr. Feigenbaum, a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), has an extensive background in artificial intelligence, knowledge-based systems research and applications, and defense research and development. Dr. Feigenbaum served as chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force from 1994 to 1997. He is a former chairman of the Computer Science Department and director of the Computer Center at Stanford University. Dr. Feigenbaum has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, including the NSF’s Computer Science Advisory Board and an ARPA Committee for Information Science and Technology. Admiral David E. Frost, a retired Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy, is president of Frost and Associates, a consulting firm serving both commercial and government industries. His background is in U.S. Navy space planning, missions, and operations. Before retiring in 1996 from the Navy, Admiral Frost served as Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Space Command, as well as Vice Commander-in-Chief of North American Aerospace Command (NORAD). NORAD is a

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities command involving the United States and Canada that provides warnings of missile and air attack against both of its member nations, as well as safeguards the air sovereignty of North America, and provides air defense forces for defense against an air attack. Other assignments include commander, Naval Space Command and Commanding Officer of the USS Seattle and USS Saratoga. Admiral Robert H. Gormley, a retired Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, is president of the Oceanus Company, a business development and technology advisory firm serving U.S. and foreign clients in fields of aviation, defense equipment, and electronics. Admiral Gormley has an extensive background in naval operational issues, particularly in regard to aviation systems. His interests are primarily in airborne reconnaissance systems, unmanned aerial vehicles, vertical/short-take-off landing aircraft, weapon system combat survivability, military requirements formulation, and test and evaluation planning. Earlier, Admiral Gormley commanded the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy as well as an air wing and fighter squadron during the Vietnam War. Dr. Frank A. Horrigan recently retired as a member of the Technical Development Staff for Sensors and Electronic Systems at Raytheon Systems Company. He is an expert in radar and sensor technologies. Dr. Horrigan, a theoretical physicist, has more than 35 years’ experience in advanced electronics, electro-optics, and computer systems. He has a wide knowledge of all technologies relevant to military systems and has experience in planning and managing information R&D investments and in projecting future technology growth directions. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Dr. Richard J. Ivanetich is director of the Computer and Software Engineering Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses, where he has spent most of his professional career. Prior to that he was assistant director of the System Evaluation Division. Through his work at IDA, Dr. Ivanetich has a broad understanding of defense systems technology and operations analyses, particularly regarding computer and information systems; command, control, and communications (C3); modeling and simulation; crisis management; and strategic and theater nuclear forces. Dr. Ivanetich began his professional career as an assistant professor of physics at Harvard University. He is a member of the DARPA Information and Science Technology (ISAT) study group and a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Admiral Wesley E. Jordan, Jr., a retired Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, is vice president of Federal Network Systems at Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN) Company. Admiral Jordan’s expertise is in naval operational issues—particularly undersea warfare issues. At BBN, Admiral Jordan is responsible for inter-networking technology initiatives for the civil and federal government. During

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities his 31-year naval career, Admiral Jordan was deputy director of Space and Electronic Warfare, director of Antisubmarine Warfare, and director of the Command and Control (C2) Plan and Program Division for the Chief of Naval Operations. Admiral Jordan was commander of the Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and also held various commanding positions in destroyer squadrons. Dr. David V. Kalbaugh is head of the Power Projection Systems Department at the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). Dr. Kalbaugh has an extensive background in missile and air systems. He joined JHU/APL in 1969 and has been involved in the development of the Tomahawk cruise missile system since its inception in the early 1970s. In addition, he was deputy director of the Navy theater ballistic missile defense (TBMD) Cost and Operational Effectiveness Analysis, and deputy director of the Navy TBMD Concept Evaluation and Integration Study sponsored by the Program Executive Office for Theater Air Defense. Dr. Kalbaugh also taught part-time for more than a decade in JHU’s Whiting School of Engineering. Dr. Annette J. Krygiel just completed serving as a distinguished visiting fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies of the National Defense University, where she investigated the problem of large-scale system integration. Dr. Krygiel’s expertise is in the management of large-scale systems, particularly in regard to software development. Prior to being appointed to the Institute for National Strategic Studies, she was director of the Central Imagery Office. Dr. Krygiel was chief scientist at the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). She has been a participant in NRC studies, including the work of the Panel on Distributed Geolibraries: Spatial Information Resources. Ms. Teresa F. Lunt is principal scientist in the Secure Document Systems Area at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Prior to joining Xerox PARC, Ms. Lunt was associate director of the Computer Science Laboratory at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) International, where she was responsible for research in distributed computing, networking, information assurance, and network security. Ms. Lunt’s expertise is in computer science, information management systems, and computer security. Fomerly, she was assistant director of distributed systems and program manager for information survivability in the Information Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Dr. Douglas R. Mook is director of Advanced Systems at Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company. Dr. Mook has experience in acoustic processing and sensor fusion. He is responsible for several key DOD programs including the U.S. Navy’s Advanced Acoustics Communications Advanced Technology Demonstration, the U.S. Army’s Federated Laboratories Digital Battlefield programs for communications and sensors, and DARPA’s Unattended Ground Sensors

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities programs. Dr. Mook is a member of the Navy’s Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Security Review Panel and has been a member of the Army Research Laboratory Restructuring Panel and the Army Digital Battlefield Definition Panel. Dr. Donald L. Nielson recently retired as director of the Computing and Engineering Sciences Division and vice president at SRI International. He has extensive experience in information technology, including information transport systems, distributed processing, artificial intelligence-aided language and reasoning systems, terminal systems and human-computer interaction, computer and communications security, information media and standards, telecommunications sciences, and image processing. He has also studied the problems of inserting advanced commercial off-the-shelf information technology into field-deployable military systems. Dr. Nielson has served on a number of government advisory committees and panels, including the Technical Advisory Committee to DARPA, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), and the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Stewart D. Personick is E. Warren Colehower Chair, a professor of telecommunications, and director of the Center for Telecommunications and Information Networking at Drexel University. Dr. Personick, a member of the NAE, has an extensive background in telecommunications, computer operations and security, and optical communications technology and applications. As the first director of Drexel’s Center for Telecommunications and Information Networking, he created four initial programs: Networks That Work, Trustworthy Networks, Next Generation Wireless, and Optical Networking. Dr. Personick is retired from Bell Communications Research, Incorporated (Bellcore), where he served as vice president of information networking. Dr. Personick is a current member of the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology. Dr. Joseph B. Reagan is a retired vice president and general manager of R&D at Lockheed Martin Missile and Space and was a corporate officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Dr. Reagan, a member of the NAE, has an extensive background in defense technology development, particularly in the area of space and missile technologies. Dr. Reagan joined Lockheed 40 years ago as a scientist, where he led the Space Instrumentation Group for 10 years and was responsible for the development and on-orbit deployment of over 20 scientific payloads for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the DOD. His research interests included the areas of space sensors, radiation belt and solar particles, nuclear weapon effects, and the effects of radiation particles on spacecraft systems. Today, Dr. Reagan is involved in activities that foster the improvement of science and mathematics education in the United States and is vice chair of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities Admiral Charles R. Saffell, a retired Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, is vice president for C4ISR systems at Titan Technologies and Information Systems Corporation, a division of the Titan Corporation, where his areas of concentration are commercial off-the-shelf solutions to C4ISR requirements, end-to-end technical solutions to current and future C4ISR challenges, strategic partnerships and acquisitions, international C4ISR, and information technology (IT) applications development. Prior to his joining Titan, Admiral Saffell was the commander of Amphibious Group Three and deputy director of the C4 Directorate of the Joint Staff. Admiral Saffell was also one of the conceivers of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) Joint Vision 2010 that has restructured warfighting operations and doctrine. Dr. Nils R. Sandell, Jr., is president and CEO at ALPHATECH, Inc. He is also a co-founder of the company. Dr. Sandell has an extensive background in automatic target recognition (ATR) and sensor management. At ALPHATECH, he is currently responsible for projects developing, planning, and scheduling algorithms for airborne reconnaissance platforms and tracking and sensor resource management algorithms for ground-moving target indication and synthetic aperture radars. A former associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Sandell lectured in areas of estimation and control theory, stochastic processes, and computer systems. Admiral William D. Smith is a retired Admiral, U.S. Navy. Admiral Smith retired in 1993 after 38 years of active duty service. He has extensive experience in Navy planning, programming, budgeting, and operational issues. His last assignment was as U.S. Military Representative to the NATO Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium. Admiral Smith has served in a number of high-ranking capacities for the Chief of Naval Operations. From 1987 to 1991, Admiral Smith served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Logistics and Navy Program Planning. From 1985 to 1987, he was director, Fiscal Management Division/ Comptroller of the Navy. Admiral Smith is a senior fellow at the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Michael G. Sovereign is professor emeritus of C3 at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), having retired on January 1, 1999. His background is in C3, joint warfare analysis, and acquisition cost analysis. For the past year, he has served as visiting research professor for Headquarters, U.S. Commander-in-Chief Pacific Fleet, where his responsibilities included conducting research on the Navy’s Virtual Information Center workshops and other experiments aimed at addressing joint C4ISR issues. Before joining NPS, Dr. Sovereign was senior principal scientist at SHAPE Technical Center (now a NATO C3 agency), where he participated in major replanning of NATO C3 systems. Dr. Sovereign has published numerous articles that

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities have spanned a wide range of subject matter, including the economics of instructional media, defense logistics, and economics. Mr. H. Gregory Tornatore is the program area manager for Defense Communications Programs at the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). His areas of expertise include military C3, wide-area surveillance, over-the-horizon sensors and targeting, communications networks and architectures, high-frequency radar, and ionospheric propagation. Mr. Tornatore also chairs the APL’s Internal Research and Development Command and Control Thrust Area, responsible for the application of new technology to DOD C3 problems. Mr. Tornatore has been employed by JHU/APL since 1977 and has been a member of the Principal Professional Staff since 1980. Prior to joining JHU/ APL, Mr. Tornatore was employed at the Electro-Physics Laboratory, ITT Avionics Division. General Paul K. Van Riper, a retired Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps, is a private consultant. General Van Riper recently retired from the Marine Corps after 41 years of active and reserve service. His expertise is in military affairs and operational issues, as well as in the importance of science and technology for the capabilities of the naval forces. Currently, he is a senior fellow with the Center for Naval Analyses participating in a wide array of defense and security-related seminars, conferences, and studies. He had a long and distinguished military career commanding or assigned to ground-combat units and is familiar with all aspects of Marine Corps operations. For 2 years prior to his retirement, General Van Riper served as Commanding General of the Marine Corps Combat Development Command. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Dr. Bruce Wald is the founder of Arlington Education Consultants, which serves both government and industry. He also holds an adjunct appointment with the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Wald has extensive expertise in space and information technology, electronic warfare, and national security implications. Dr. Wald is the former associate director of Research and director of Space and Communications Technology at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Wald has been a member of numerous government and industry advisory boards and panels. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Admiral Raymond M. Walsh is a retired Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy. Admiral Walsh’s background is in DOD/Navy financial management and policy formulation. Currently, Admiral Walsh is a senior systems engineer at Basic Commerce and Industries, Incorporated (BCII). Prior to joining BCII, he was a lead analyst at Sonalysts, Incorporated. Admiral Walsh’s broad range of experience includes the command of two surface combatants as a naval surface warfare officer and as an operations analyst ashore involved with Navy planning, programming, and

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Network-Centric Naval Forces: A Transition Strategy for Enhancing Operational Capabilities budgeting processes. Admiral Walsh was also the director of the Operations Division for the Office of Budget and Reports under the Navy Comptroller, where he was the responsible official for all Navy operating budget accounts. Admiral Walsh recently served on the NRC’s Committee on Shore Installation Readiness and Management. Ms. Mitzi M. Wertheim is a consultant to Enterprise Solutions at the Center for Naval Analyses. Her expertise is in the application of business process reengineering methods and teaching large corporations to increase service while reducing cost. In recent years, her research interests have focused on naval career, education, and training issues. Before joining CNA, Ms. Wertheim was vice president of Enterprise Solutions at SRA International, Incorporated. Her responsibilities included identifying linkages and interdependencies in organizations and then leveraging IT to achieve business objectives. From 1977 to 1981, Ms. Wertheim was the deputy undersecretary of the Navy. Ms. Wertheim is involved with a number of organizations, including the Council of Foreign Relations and the Advisory Board of the Defense Budget Group. She is a founder and executive committee member of the MIT Seminar XXI. Ms. Wertheim is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Mr. Geoffrey A. Whiting is director of Maritime Systems at Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company. Mr. Whiting has a broad understanding of C4ISR and shipboard defense systems. As director of Maritime Systems, Mr. Whiting is responsible for maritime tactical signal exploitation systems for U.S. and foreign defense customers and for the development of lower life-cycle costs and increased functionality that optimize maritime product lines. Mr. Whiting’s professional experience includes more than 25 years with the U.S. Navy in operational, intelligence, and technical positions. Mr. Dell P. Williams III is senior technical advisor to the president and CEO of Teledesic Corporation. He is responsible for technical oversight of the development of the Teledesic network, a constellation of several hundred low-Earth-orbit satellites providing worldwide access to “fiber-like” telecommunications services. Mr. Williams has an extensive background in commercial communications, systems engineering, space systems, and information assurance. Prior to his work on the Teledesic network, Mr. Williams was vice president of Electronic Defense Programs at ARGO Systems, a wholly owned Boeing subsidiary. He also was director of Advanced Programs at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company and director of Space Systems at NASA Headquarters.