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Committee Biographies

S.Leonard Syme, Ph.D., is emeritus Professor of Epidemiology at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Syme's research focuses on risk factors for coronary heart disease. His major interest has been psychosocial risk factors such as job stress, social support and poverty. Since his retirement in 1993, Dr. Syme has devoted most of his time to the development of interventions to prevent disease and promote health. He currently is the Director of the Center for Community Wellness, which provides useful health information to people and their communities. Dr. Syme was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and received the Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Achievement, the Lilienfeld Award for Excellence in Teaching, the California Senate Commendation for Illustrious Record of Accomplishment, and the American College of Physicians Award for Distinguished Contributions in Preventive Medicine.

Hortensia Amaro, Ph.D., is Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health and board member of the Boston Public Health Commission. Her research career over the last 20 years has focused on the public health issues of substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, HIV prevention, and mental health among Hispanic and African American communities. Dr. Amaro's professional contributions have been recognized by numerous organizations including the American Psychological Association, the Association of Women in Psychology, the Massachusetts Public Health Association, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Simmons College, who



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Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research Committee Biographies S.Leonard Syme, Ph.D., is emeritus Professor of Epidemiology at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Syme's research focuses on risk factors for coronary heart disease. His major interest has been psychosocial risk factors such as job stress, social support and poverty. Since his retirement in 1993, Dr. Syme has devoted most of his time to the development of interventions to prevent disease and promote health. He currently is the Director of the Center for Community Wellness, which provides useful health information to people and their communities. Dr. Syme was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and received the Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Achievement, the Lilienfeld Award for Excellence in Teaching, the California Senate Commendation for Illustrious Record of Accomplishment, and the American College of Physicians Award for Distinguished Contributions in Preventive Medicine. Hortensia Amaro, Ph.D., is Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health and board member of the Boston Public Health Commission. Her research career over the last 20 years has focused on the public health issues of substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, HIV prevention, and mental health among Hispanic and African American communities. Dr. Amaro's professional contributions have been recognized by numerous organizations including the American Psychological Association, the Association of Women in Psychology, the Massachusetts Public Health Association, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Simmons College, who

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Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research conferred upon her an honorary doctorate degree in humane letters. At the national level, Dr. Amaro has served on numerous committees including the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the Advisory Board to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She serves as Associate Editor of the Psychology of Women Quarterly and on the editorial board of the American Journal of Public Health. Eugene Emory, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at Emory University. Dr. Emory 's clinical and research interests are in developmental psychophysiology and neuropsychology, psychobiological approaches to high risk research, perinatal brain trauma and early stress, neuropsychological assessment of developmental disorders, differential diagnosis and court testimony, cognitive-behavior therapy, and parent training. His current research projects include studies in behavioral perinatology, psychosocial stress in women of reproductive age, and cerebral blood flow during pregnancy. Dr. Emory was a recipient of the Research Scientist Development Award from the National Institute of Mental Health. An editorial board member of the International Journal of Psychophysiology since 1984, and Child Development, Dr. Emory has published numerous research materials including Psychophysiological Responses to Stress during Pregnancy and Salivary Caffeine and Neonatal Behavior. Arthur Kellermann, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor and Director, Center for Injury Control, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, and Professor and Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Emory University. Dr. Kellermann has served as Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on several research grants, including federally funded studies of handgun related violence and injury, emergency cardiac care, and the use of emergency room services. Among his many awards and distinctions, he is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians (1992), and is the recipient of a meritorious service award from the Tennessee State Legislature (1993) and the Hal Jayne Academic Excellence Award from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (1997), and was elected to the membership of the Institute of Medicine (1999). In addition, Dr. Kellermann is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine, and has served as a reviewer for the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the American Journal of Public Health. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology in the Ohio State University College of Medicine, as well as Director of the Division of Health Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry. Working in the area of stress and immune function, she has authored more than 140 articles and chapters (most in collaboration with Ronald Glaser), and together they coedited the Handbook of Human Stress and Immunity (Academic Press, 1994). She has served on the

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Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research NIMH Mental Health and AIDS study section, as well as the editorial boards of 10 professional journals including the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Health Psychology. Her research is supported by several grants from the National Institutes of Health, including a MERIT award from NIMH on which she is the Principal Investigator, and a Research Career Development Award. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association, she received an Award for Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association's Division of Health Psychology, and she is the Past President of the Division of Health Psychology. Marie C.McCormick, M.D., Sc.D., is the Sumner and Ester Feldberg Professor and Chair of the Department of Maternal and Child Health, Harvard School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of infant mortality and low birth weight, the measurement of and factors associated with child health status, especially among very low birth weight infants, and evaluation of maternal and child health services, especially those focused on infant mortality reduction and early childhood development. Dr. McCormick is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. In addition, she is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Among her many awards and distinctions, Dr. McCormick is a recipient of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association Research Award, is a member of Delta Omega (Alpha Chapter), and is a Fellow of the Association for Health Services Research. David Mechanic, Ph.D., is the René Dubos University Professor of Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers University. He also directs the NIMH Center at Rutgers for Research on the Organization and Financing of Care for the Severely Mentally Ill. Dr. Mechanic's research and writing deal with social aspects of health and health care. He has written or edited 24 books and more than 400 research articles, chapters and other publications in medical sociology, health policy, health services research, and the social and behavioral sciences. Dr. Mechanic is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. He has received many awards, including the Health Services Research Prize from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration and the Baxter Allegiance Foundation, the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research, the First Carl Taube Award for Distinguished Contributions to Mental Health Services Research from the American Public Health Association, and the Distinguished Medical Sociologist Award and Lifetime Contributions Award in Mental Health from the American Sociological Association.

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Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research Paul G.Shekelle, M.D., Ph.D., is a consultant in health sciences at RAND, Associate Professor of Medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine, a staff physician at the VA Medical Center in West Los Angeles, and a Senior Research Associate of the VA Health Services Research and Development Service. He has been the principal investigator for 10 studies that have examined such questions as the reliability of expert panel processes at setting quality criteria; the effects of differing practice guidelines on the likelihood of physician behavior change; the usefulness of the RAND appropriateness method in the AHCPR clinical practice guideline development process; the current measurement of the quality of back care, diabetes care, and hypertension care; and the effect of practice guidelines on patient outcomes in the emergency department. Since 1997, Dr. Shekelle has been the Director of the Southern California Evidence-Based Practice Center. Glorian Sorensen, Ph.D., M.P.H., Director, Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Professor of Health and Social Behavior, at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. The core of Dr. Sorensen 's research is randomized worksite- and community-based studies that test the effectiveness of theory-driven interventions targeting individual and organizational change. Dr. Sorensen conducted the first randomized controlled worksite intervention trials to integrate messages on occupational health and health behaviors. She is currently the Principal Investigator of the National Cancer Institute-funded Harvard Cancer Prevention Program Project focusing on “Cancer Control in Working Class, Multi-Ethnic Populations.” Dr. Sorensen is a member of the NCI's National 5-a-Day for Better Health External Advisory Group, and was a member of the NIH study section on Community Prevention and Control. In addition, Dr. Sorensen is a member of the Editorial Board for the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention, and formerly served on the Editorial Boards of the American Journal of Health Behavior, the American Journal of Health Promotion, and the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. Claire E. Sterk, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. In addition, she has adjunct appointments in the Departments of Anthropology, Sociology and Women's Studies, and a joined appointment in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sterk's research interests include women's health, community-based health prevention and intervention, substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and access to health care. Dr. Sterk is the Atlanta representative on the Community Epidemiology Working Group of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and is a member of the Atlanta/Fulton County Commission on Children and Youth. In addition, she is a member of the National Institutes of Health Behavioral AIDS Review group and serves as an ad hoc reviewer on several other panels. Dr. Sterk also serves as a member of an expert

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Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research committee reviewing the anti-drug media campaign targeting adolescents and launched by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Sterk is a Fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology, and is a member of the editorial board of the journal AIDS and Anthropology Bulletin. John A. Swets, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist, Emeritus at BBN Technologies; Senior Research Associate in Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; and Lecturer on Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Dr. Swets's research centers on the psychological processes of sensation, perception, attention, thinking, learning, and decision making; computer-aided instruction; enhancement of human performance; information retrieval; evaluation of diagnostic systems; and enhancement of diagnostic performance. He has been a member of several national panels and committees, recently serving as chair of the National Research Council's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and as senior consultant to the Federal Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Human Brain Project. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Acoustical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.