PANEL

D. Allan Bromley is the Sterling Professor of the Sciences and dean of engineering at Yale University. He served as the assistant to the president for science and technology and was the director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1989 to 1993. At Yale, he has served as the associate director of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, the chairman of the Physics Department, and the director of the A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory. He received his PhD in physics from the University of Rochester. Dr. Bromley was awarded the US National Medal of Science in 1989. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

E. Edward David is the president of EED, Inc and consults on R&D, strategic planning and management, intellectual property, technology transfer, enhancing corporate research programs, and developing corporate-academic research partnerships for the Washington Advisory Group. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. David served as science advisor to the president and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1970 to 1973. From 1977 to 1986, he was president of Exxon Research and Engineering Company. Dr. David spent the first 2 decades of his research career at Bell Telephone Laboratories, finally as executive director. He is on the boards of several businesses and on technical advisory boards nationally and abroad. Dr. David is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences.

John H. Gibbons is Special Advisor, US Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs. He served as assistant to the president for science and technology and as the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, both beginning in 1993. Before then, he was the director of Office of Technology Assessment (1979-1993) of the US Congress. He was a professor of physics and the director of energy, environment and resources at the University of Tennessee (1974-1979). He received his PhD in physics from Duke University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Mary L. Good (Chair) is Dean, Donaghey College of Information Science and System Engineering, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and a managing member at Venture Capital Investors, LLC. She received her PhD in inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry from the University of Arkansas. Dr. Good served as the undersecretary for technology in the US Department of Commerce from 1993 until recently. Before that, she worked as a Senior vice president for technology, and director of research for Allied Signal, Inc (1985-1993). She also served as a vice president and director of research at UOP, Inc. (formerly Universal Oil Products) from 1980 to 1985. She has served as the vice-chairman and chairman of the National Science Board and is a member of the National Academy of Engineeri ng.

M.R.C. Greenwood is chancellor and professor of biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, a position she has held since July 1, 1996. Earlier, she served as dean of graduate studies, vice provost for academic outreach, and professor of biology and internal medicine at the University of California, Davis. Previously, Dr. Greenwood taught at Vassar College, where she was the John Guy Vassar Professor of Natural Sciences, chair of the Department of Biology, and director of the Undergraduate Research Summer Institute. She received her PhD in physiologic developmental biology and neuroscience from Rockefeller University. From November 1993 to May 1995, Dr. Greenwood was associate director for science at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. She was, in 1998, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and now serves as its Board chair. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Anita K. Jones is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Virginia. She was an assistant and then associate professor of computer science at Carnegie-Mellon University until 1982. From 1981 to 1987 she was vice president and cofounder of Tartan Laboratories. She received her PhD in computer science from CMU. In 1988, she started at the University of Virginia as a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science. From 1993 to 1997 she served at the US Department of Defense, where, as director of defense research and engineering, she oversaw the department's science and technology program, research laboratories, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. She has received the US Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Award, a Distinguished Public Service Award, and a tribute in the Congressional Record from Senator Charles Robb. She now serves on the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement